1 Route 66 Understanding 1 and 2 Peter and Jude Dr


Nov 8, 2017 - Writing to believers in Christ who were experiencing extreme persecution at the hands of a pagan culture, Peter advocated holy living...

0 downloads 0 Views 418KB Size

1 Route 66 Understanding 1 and 2 Peter and Jude Dr. Stephen Rummage, Senior Pastor Bell Shoals Baptist Church November 8, 2017 1 Peter – “Triumph over Trials” 1 Peter 4:12 (ESV) Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery trial when it comes upon you to test you, as though something strange were happening to you. 1 Peter 4:13 (ESV) But rejoice insofar as you share Christ’s sufferings, that you may also rejoice and be glad when His glory is revealed. 2 Peter – “Faithfulness against Falsehood” 2 Peter 3:17 (ESV) You therefore, beloved, knowing this beforehand, take care that you are not carried away with the error of lawless people and lose your own stability. 2 Peter 3:18 (ESV) But grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. To Him be the glory both now and to the day of eternity. Amen. Jude – “Fighting for the Faith” Jude 3 (ESV) Beloved, although I was very eager to write to you about our common salvation, I found it necessary to write appealing to you to contend for the faith that was once for all delivered to the saints. Making Sense of Suffering 1 Peter 4:12-19 1 Peter 4:12 (ESV) Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery trial when it comes upon you to test you… 1. Suffering: An Experience to Expect 1 Peter 4:12 (ESV) Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery trial when it comes upon you to test you, as though something strange were happening to you. 2 Timothy 3:12 (ESV) Indeed, all who desire to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted,

2 2. Suffering: A Reason to Rejoice 1 Peter 4:13 (ESV) But rejoice insofar as you share Christ’s sufferings, that you may also rejoice and be glad when His glory is revealed. 1 Peter 4:14 (ESV) If you are insulted for the name of Christ, you are blessed, because the Spirit of glory and of God rests upon you. Acts 5:41 (ESV) Then they left the presence of the council, rejoicing that they were counted worthy to suffer dishonor for the name. 3. Suffering: A Season to Scrutinize 1 Peter 4:15 (ESV) But let none of you suffer as a murderer or a thief or an evildoer or as a meddler. 1 Peter 4:16 (ESV) Yet if anyone suffers as a Christian, let him not be ashamed, but let him glorify God in that name. 1 Peter 4:17 (ESV) For it is time for judgment to begin at the household of God; and if it begins with us, what will be the outcome for those who do not obey the gospel of God? 1 Peter 4:18 (ESV) And “If the righteous is scarcely saved, what will become of the ungodly and the sinner?” 4. Suffering: A Time to Trust 1 Peter 4:19 (ESV) Therefore let those who suffer according to God’s will entrust their souls to a faithful Creator while doing good. 1 Peter 2:21 (ESV) For to this you have been called, because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, so that you might follow in His steps. 1 Peter 2:22 (ESV) He committed no sin, neither was deceit found in His mouth. 1 Peter 2:23 (ESV) When He was reviled, He did not revile in return; when He suffered, He did not threaten, but continued entrusting Himself to Him who judges justly.

Understanding 1 Peter Meaning: Named for the author of the letter Author: Peter Audience: Christians scattered throughout Asia Minor Date of Writing: 62-65 AD Theme: How to live victoriously in the midst of hostility. Key Verses: 1 Peter 4:12-19 Structure of 1 Peter I. Salvation in Christ (1 Peter 1:1-25) a. Selected for Salvation (1 Peter 1:1-2) b. Security of Salvation (1 Peter 1:3-12) c. Steadfastness in Salvation (1 Peter 1:13-25) II. Servants of Christ (1 Peter 2:1-12) a. Pursue the Word (1 Peter 2:1-8) b. Proclaim the Word (1 Peter 2:9-10) c. Produce Works (1 Peter 2:11-12) III. Submit to Christ (1 Peter 2:13-3:12) a. Submit to Government (1 Peter 2:13-17) b. Submit to Masters (1 Peter 2:18-25) c. Submit to Husbands (1 Peter 3:1-6) d. Submit to One Another (1 Peter 3:7-12) IV. Suffering with Christ (1 Peter 3:13-4:19) a. Suffering for Righteousness (1 Peter 3:13-17) b. Suffering by Christ (1 Peter 3:18-4:6) c. Suffering for God (1 Peter 4:7-19) V. Shepherd like Christ (1 Peter 5:1-14) a. The Willing Shepherd (1 Peter 5:1-2) b. The Humble Shepherd (1 Peter 5:3-7) c. The Vigilant Shepherd (1 Peter 5:8-9) d. The Spiritually Mature Shepherd (1 Peter 5:10-11) VI. Standing with Christ (1 Peter 5:12-14)

The Christian Calling: Holiness Writing to believers in Christ who were experiencing extreme persecution at the hands of a pagan culture, Peter advocated holy living. Seven times in Peter’s first letter, we find the word holy (hagios in Greek) used in reference to conduct or behavior. And even when the word is not explicitly used, pure conduct is called for again and again. Holy implies sacredness, being consecrated to God, or being worthy of God. In order to qualify for this label, a person or thing has to be free from impurity. There can be no hint of moral pollution or spiritual defilement. To be holy is to be free from anything that would offend a perfect God. This state may been impossible to achieve. After all, how can imperfect, fallen creatures like ourselves live up to the command to “be holy in all [our] conduct” (1:15)? The answer is found in the opening sentence of Peter’s letter. Sanctification, the process by which we are made holy, is “of the Spirit” (1:2). The Holy Spirit of God, who indwells us at the moment of salvation, is able to transform us. By the power of the Spirit we find the ability to “abstain from fleshly lusts which war against the soul” (2:11). As we yield ourselves to God, and as we soberly and vigilantly resist the devil (5:9) and all his temptations, we will find that God is able to “perfect, establish, strengthen, and settle” us (5:10). Holy living should be our goal not merely because God commands it, but also because it befits our true identity. In Chris we are no longer citizens of a sinful world, but the “people of God” (2:10). We are “sojourners and pilgrims” in this world, on our way to our true home, which is heaven (2:11). Furthermore, holiness serves an evangelistic purpose. It is a “holy nation” and “special people” who are able to “proclaim the praises of Him who called you out of darkness into His marvelous light” (2:9). It is our “honorable” conduct and “good works” that cause evildoers to glorify God (2:12). Finally, Peter speaks of the day when we will stand before God and give an account for the way we have lived. Those who have maintained a lifelong fear (reverence) of God resulting in holy living will be best prepared for that day of reckoning (1:17). Source:

The Nelson Study Bible : New King James Version. Nashville : T. Nelson Publishers, 1997

Understanding 2 Peter Meaning: Named for the author of the letter Author: Peter Audience: Christians scattered throughout Asia Minor Date of Writing: 66-68 AD Theme: Warning against false teachers and exhortation to grow in faith and knowledge. Key Verses: 2 Peter 3:17-18 Structure of 2 Peter I. Faith in Christ (2 Peter 1:1-21) a. Gift of Christ (2 Peter 1:1-4) b. Knowledge of Christ (2 Peter 1:5-11) c. Remember Christ (2 Peter 1:12-15 d. Truth about Christ (2 Peter 1:16-21) II. False Teachers (2 Peter 2:1-22) a. Their Condemnation (2 Peter 2:1-9) b. Their Character (2 Peter 2:10-17) c. Their Corruption (2 Peter 2:18-22) III. Faithful Christians (2 Peter 3:1-18) a. Be mindful of the Word (2 Peter 3:1-7) b. Be not Forgetful of the Promise (2 Peter 3:8-10) c. Be Diligent to be Blameless (2 Peter 3:11-14) d. Beware of Falling Away (2 Peter 3:15-18) Peter’s first letter was to console, the second to warn. In his first letter, Peter was trying to encourage Christians who were suffering terrible persecutions from without. In his second letter, he is warning them of danger within the church.

Writing to beleaguered Christians in an evil world where false teachers were aggressively spreading dangerous heresies, Peter urged “grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ” (3:18). The following is a summary of the components of spiritual growth Peter advocated. Practice Godly Living

Passage 1:1-15

Principles Through Christ we have been given everything we need to live godly lives. We are partakers of the divine nature. We have been freed from the power of the old corrupt, sinful nature.

Reliance on the Scriptures

1:16-21; 3:1, 2

Christian doctrine is not just another point of view; it is not a fable. The Scriptures can be trusted because they were written by prophets and apostles inspired by the Holy Spirit. The Scriptures function as a light in a dark age; they are an absolute in a relativistic world.

Opposition to False Teaching

2:1-22

We are not to be swayed by the large numbers of people who are persuaded by unbiblical ideas. Judgment is guaranteed for all who oppose the truths of God. We should exercise discernment granted by the Holy Spirit to detect the deceptive teachings and alluring promises of the ungodly.

Watchfulness

3:3-18

By looking for the return of Christ, we can avoid the sinful traps of the world. We need to take care that we do not become lax in our thinking - God has set a day which will mark the end of this world as we know it. God’s promise of judgment should prompt us to encourage others to repent and believe in Christ.

Source:

The Nelson Study Bible : New King James Version. Nashville : T. Nelson Publishers, 1997

Understanding Jude Meaning: Named for the author of the letter Author: Jude, the brother of James and half-brother of Jesus Audience: “The Called” Date of Writing: 75-90 AD Theme: Stay faithful to and contend for the faith Key Verse: Jude 3b Structure of Jude on back of card The Use of Apocryphal Sources The Jewish Apocrypha consists of books and writings that were never recognized as part of the canon of Scripture, but which served a devotional purpose for many believers of ancient times, including some of the authors of the New Testament. Jude cites two books of the Apocrypha in his letter. Jude 9 apparently comes from The Assumption of Moses, and verse 14 comes from The Book of Enoch. Today we do not have a complete text of The Assumption of Moses, but two early church fathers, Clement of Alexandria and Origen, testify that v. 9 is a reference to that book. Jude is not the only New Testament author who quotes extrabiblical sources. In 1 Cor. 10:4, Paul apparently made use of a Hebrew commentary (the Midrash) to support his interpretation of Israel’s wilderness wanderings. In Acts 17:28 and Titus 1:12, he quoted from pagan poets to support some of his assertions. Though we do not know where the names Jannes and Jambres come from (see 2 Tim. 3:8), Paul did not hesitate to use their story as an example of godlessness for Timothy. Should the New Testament writers have quoted from apocryphal sources? Surely God had no trouble guiding the biblical writers in selecting material from these sources. Luke knew of “many’ accounts of the life of Christ (see Luke 1:1), which he set out to better with his own “orderly account” (1:3). Along the same lines, Paul had at least one letter from the Corinthian church to guide his responses in First and Second Corinthians. Even the devil is quoted in Matt. 4:3, 6, 9. This does not mean that these sources are inspired, or even accurate, but it does mean that sometimes New Testament writers drew from the written sources God had given them to communicate effectively what He wanted them to say. The writers of Scripture wrote all that, and only that, which God had inspired them to say. We must affirm with Peter that the ultimate origin of Scripture is the mind of God (see 2 Peter 1:19-21). Source:

The Nelson Study Bible : New King James Version. Nashville : T. Nelson Publishers. 1997

Structure of Jude I. A Personal Introduction (Jude 1-3) a. Identification (Jude 1) b. Benediction (Jude 2) c. Intention (Jude 3) II. A Pastoral Condemnation (Jude 4-7) a. The Presence of False Teachers (Jude 4) b. The Punishment of Former Transgressors (Jude 5-7) i. Israelite Unbelievers (Jude 5) ii. Angelic Rebels (Jude 6) iii. Sodom and Gomorrah Homosexuals (Jude 7) III. A Spiritual Deception (Jude 8-10) a. Rebellion (Jude 8) b. Presumption (Jude 9-10)) IV. Multiple Illustrations (Jude 11-13) a. Cain - An Attitude of Dissatisfaction (Jude 11) b. Balaam - An Attitude of Materialism (Jude 11) c. Korah - An Attitude of Rebellion (Jude 11) d. “Hidden Reefs” (Jude 12) e. “Clouds Without Water” (Jude 12) f. “Trees Without Fruit” (Jude 12) g. “Wild Waves” (Jude 13) h. “Wandering Stars” (Jude 13) V. A Historical Prediction (Jude 14-16) VI. A Final Exhortation (Jude 17-23) a. A Prophetic Caution (Jude 17-18) b. A Precise Definition (Jude 19) c. A Personal Application (Jude 20-23) VII. A Beautiful Benediction (Jude 24-25)