1 Route 66 Understanding Obadiah, Jonah and Micah Dr


Oct 5, 2016 - used the story of Jonah as an analogy of His own impending death and ... Jesus' analogy depends on the recognition of two historical rea...

0 downloads 0 Views 117KB Size

1 Route 66 Understanding Obadiah, Jonah and Micah Dr. Stephen Rummage, Senior Pastor Bell Shoals Baptist Church October 5, 2016 Structure of Obadiah 1. The Doom of Edom (Obadiah vv. 1-16) 2. The Deliverance of Zion (Obadiah vv. 17-21) Structure of Jonah 1. The Prodigal Prophet - Running away from God (Jonah 1) 2. The Praying Prophet - Running to God (Jonah 2) 3. The Preaching Prophet - Running for God (Jonah 3) 4. The Pouting Prophet - Running into God (Jonah 4) Structure of Micah 1. Prophecy of Retribution (Micah 1-3) 2. Prophecy of Restoration (Micah 4-5) 3. Prophecy of Repentance (Micah 6-7) How to Come to God Micah 6:6-8 Micah 6:6 (ESV) “With what shall I come before the LORD, and bow myself before God on high? Shall I come before Him with burnt offerings, with calves a year old? Micah 6:7 (ESV) Will the LORD be pleased with thousands of rams, with ten thousands of rivers of oil? Shall I give my firstborn for my transgression, the fruit of my body for the sin of my soul?” Micah 6:8 (ESV) He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God? 1. Our Deep Need for Coming to God Micah 6:6a (ESV) “With what shall I come before the LORD, and bow myself before God on high?... 2. Our Failed Attempts at Coming to God Micah 6:6b (ESV) ... Shall I come before Him with burnt offerings, with calves a year old?

2 Micah 6:7 (ESV) Will the LORD be pleased with thousands of rams, with ten thousands of rivers of oil? Shall I give my firstborn for my transgression, the fruit of my body for the sin of my soul?” Hosea 6:6 (ESV) For I desire steadfast love and not sacrifice, the knowledge of God rather than burnt offerings. 3. Our Only Hope for Coming to God Micah 6:8 (ESV) He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God? John 14:6 (ESV) Jesus said to him, I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through Me. Hebrews 7:25 (ESV) Consequently, He is able to save to the uttermost those who draw near to God through Him, since He always lives to make intercession for them.

Understanding Obadiah Meaning: Obadiah means “servant” Author: Obadiah Audience: The People of Edom Date of Writing: 841 or 586 BC Theme: Retribution Key Verses: Obadiah 15 Structure of Obadiah I. The Doom of Edom (Obadiah 1-16) a. Doom Declared b. Doom Described c. Doom Deserved d. Doom Dated II. The Deliverance of Zion (Obadiah 17-21) a. The Character of Deliverance b. The Completeness of Deliverance c. The Consummation of Deliverance The book of Obadiah is one of only two minor prophets that is addressed entirely to a nation other than Israel or Judah. It deals with the ancient feud between Israel and the nation of Edom, between the descendants of Jacob and those of his brother Esau. Through the prophet Obadiah the Lord expressed His indignation at the nation of Edom. When they should have been helping their relatives, they were gloating over the Israelites’ problems and raiding their homes. A day was coming - the day of the Lord - when all these wrongs would be righted. The Lord would bring justice to the world. Source: Nelson's new illustrated Bible commentary. Nashville: T. Nelson Publishers. 1999.

JACOB AND ESAU Throughout the Old Testament there had been conflict between the family lines of Jacob and Esau. Those brothers each fathered a nation; Jacob fathered the nation of Israel, and Esau’s descendants became the nation of Edom (cf. Gen 27:29, 39-40; 36:8; Num. 20:14-21). Edom was ultimately destroyed in A.D. 70 by the Romans. The problem addressed in Obadiah was how the kingdom (Obad. 1:21) of the Lord could be regained. God would replay the evil done against Israel by Edom. That was a fulfillment of the covenant of Genesis 12:3 - God would curse those who cursed Israel. The promise to Abraham is still in effect (Obad. 1:10, 15; cf. Gen. 27:29). Abraham’s land will be restored (Obad. 1:17, 19-20), and all the nations will be judged (1:15). THE EDOMITES AND CHRIST Even in the New Testament ties strife between the Hebrews and Edomites continued in the Jews’ hatred for King Herod who was of Idumean (Edomite) descent. Herod tried to kill the ultimate Representative of Israel, Christ (Matt. 2:1-18). The judgment that would come upon the Edomites because of their cruelty and lack of compassion toward the descendants of Jacob was described in many Old Testament prophecies (cf. Isa. 34:5-15; Jer. 49:7-22; Lam. 4:21-22; Ezek. 25:12-14; Amos 1:11-12). Source: Tyndale concise Bible commentary. Rev. ed. of: New Bible companion. 1990. Wheaton, Ill.: Tyndale House Publishers. 2001.

Route 66: The Highway of Redemption from Genesis to Revelation Bell Shoals Baptist Church - Dr. Stephen Rummage, Senior Pastor

Understanding Jonah Meaning: Jonah means “dove” Author: Jonah Audience: The Ten Northern Tribes of Israel Date of Writing: 760 BC Theme: The God of the Hebrews has concern for the whole world. Key Verses: Jonah 3:1-10 Structure of Jonah I. The Prodigal Prophet (Jonah 1) II. The Praying Prophet (Jonah 2) III. The Preaching Prophet (Jonah 3) IV. The Pouting Prophet (Jonah 4) Miracles in the book of Jonah The calming of the sea The provision of the great fish The preservation of Jonah in the fish The disgorging of Jonah on land The preparing of the plant The worm The salvation of many Ninevites

1:15 1:17 1:17 2:10 4:6 4:7

The book of Jonah has been described as a parable, an allegory and a satire. The famous story of the “great fish” (often erroneously thought of as a whale) has led many to dismiss the book as merely a biblical “fish story.” It is a mistake (based in part on the difficulty some readers have in coming to terms with the miraculous character of the story line) to assume that the events and actions of the book are not historical in nature. While the story line is unusual, it is presented as normal history. Further, Jesus used the story of Jonah as an analogy of His own impending death and resurrection (Matt. 12:39-41). Jesus’ analogy depends on the recognition of two historical realities: (1) the historical experience of Jonah in the belly of the great fish, and (2) the historical experience of the repentance of the people of Nineveh based on the preaching of Jonah (Luke 11:29-32). Indeed, the phrase “the sign of the prophet Jonah” must have been a recurring phrase in the teaching of Christ, for it is found on more than one occasion in Matthew’s account of Christ’s ministry (Matt. 16:4). Thus any view of the Book of Jonah that does not assume it describes historical events is obliged to explain away the clear words of Jesus to the contrary. Source: Nelson’s new illustrated Bible commentary. Nashville: T. Nelson Publishers. 1999.

Route 66: The Highway of Redemption from Genesis to Revelation Bell Shoals Baptist Church - Dr. Stephen Rummage, Senior Pastor

Understanding Micah Meaning: Micah means “who is like Yahweh?” Author: Micah Audience: Israel and Judah Date of Writing: 700 BC Theme: The book of doom and hope. Key Verses: Micah 6:6-8 Structure of Micah I. The Prophecy of Retribution (Micah 1:1-3:12) a. The Calamity b. The Cause II. The Promise of Restoration (Micah 4:1-5:15) a. Restoration Depicted b. Restoration Delayed c. Restoration Described III. The Plea for Repentance (Micah 6:1-7:20) a. Israel’s Sins b. Israel’s Sorrows c. Israel’s Savior The major sections of Micah are introduced with the word “Hear” (1:2, 3:1, 6:1) Passages concerning Christ: Birthplace named Christ as King Christ reigning in righteousness over the whole earth

5:1 2:12-13 4:1, 7

Geographical puns in Micah With skillfully written wordplays on the names of Judah’s cities, Micah prophesied of the coming destruction of Judah (1:3-16). He turned around the meaning of a number of town names as a way of describing the world being turned upside down. Shaphir, meaning “Beautiful,” would be shamed (1:11); and Jerusalem, a name suggesting “Peace,” would be disrupted (1:12). Lachish, a name sounding like the Hebrew word for swift steeds, would flee on its horses. All this agitation was caused by God’s judgment on Judah for worshiping other gods on the high places. In fact, idolatry was so rampant that Micah describes Jerusalem and Samaria, the capital cities of Judah and Israel, as high places themselves (1:5). Source: The Nelson study Bible: New King James Version. Nashville: T. Nelson Publishers. 1997.

Route 66: The Highway of Redemption from Genesis to Revelation Bell Shoals Baptist Church - Dr. Stephen Rummage, Senior Pastor