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A PUBLICATION OF THE HARKER SCHOOL l SPECIAL ISSUE 2018

M A G A Z I N E

Celebrating

125 Years (1893-2018)

CO M M E M O R AT I V E A N N I V E R S A RY I S S U E

M A G A Z I N E

SPECI A L I S SU E 2018 I V O LU ME 10, N U MB E R 1 Pam Dickinson Office of Communication Director William Cracraft Managing Editor Catherine Snider Production Editor Mark Kocina Photographer Marla Holt Lead Writer Jennifer Maragoni Copy Editor Zach Jones, Rebecca McCartney, Sue Smith, Terry Walsh Contributors Blue Heron Design Design Have an idea? Contact us: [email protected] 408.345.9273 Or write: Harker Magazine 500 Saratoga Ave. San Jose, CA 95129 Harker is a Bay Area Green Certified Business of Santa Clara County. As part of our many sustainability efforts, Harker Magazine is printed on 100% recycled paper.

On this page: Main building, Miss Harker’s School, 1915 Front and back cover photographs provided by Harker Archives

HAR KE R MAGA Z I NE l 125T H A N N I V E RS A RY S P E C I A L I S S U E

CONTENTS The Harker School Celebrates 125 Years A timeline summarizes our history.

The Founders and Heads of Harker Meet the visionaries who founded and led our school.

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The Nichols Legacy Visionaries Major Nichols and Howard and Diana Nichols led the school into our present era.

Signature Programs Outstanding and varied programs have always transformed the student experience.

Achievement Highlights We gather some standout milestones from decades of accomplishments.

Giving Back Encouraging our students to give back to their communities is in our DNA.

Fun Facts About Harker Test your knowledge about the school with these archival fun facts.

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The Harker School 1893-2018 Celebrating 125 Years of Vision, Passion and Achievement

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n the late 1880s, the town of Palo Alto had only about 1,400 residents. It would be nearly another 100 years before the term “Silicon Valley” was coined and the area became known as an innovation hub. In 1890, Congress had just established Yosemite as the nation’s third national park and Stanford University was in its infancy. However, the need for students who were wellprepared to go on to Stanford and other top universities was evident. So, in 1893 at the behest of Stanford’s first president, The Harker School was founded by Frank Cramer as Manzanita Hall, a college preparatory school for boys. Miss Harker’s School for Girls, founded by Catherine Harker, followed soon after in 1902. Students in those early days studied a college preparatory curriculum, participated in co-curricular activities and developed high moral character all while living under the care of teachers and administrators who had their best interests at heart. Over the years, Harker has evolved from a military academy for boys and a unique college preparatory school for girls, to a prestigious coeducational institution for children from preschool through high school. Throughout its history, Harker has prepared students to lead lives of service and integrity by offering a rigorous academic program and topnotch opportunities for personal development and participation in extracurricular activities.

The Life of Harker 125 Years at a Glance

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1893

1902

1919

1920

Frank Cramer founds Manzanita Hall, a college preparatory school for boys in Palo Alto, at the urging of Stanford University’s first president, David Starr Jordan.

Catherine Harker, also encouraged by David Starr Jordan, opens Miss Harker’s School, a college preparatory school for girls. A lower school is added in 1903, which girls ages 5 to 14 attend until 1921. The high school program continues until the 1950s.

Richard Kelly, Greenville Emery, Katherine Monroe and Nellie Hansen purchase Manzanita Hall, which becomes Palo Alto Military Academy (PAMA), a school for boys in grades 1-8.

PAMA’s summer recreational camp, Camp Eldorado, is established at Alpine Lake in the Sierra Nevada mountains, beginning Harker’s long history of offering summer enrichment programs, both recreational and academic.

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“Its courses are so thorough that a course in the School insures sound culture to those who intend to enter upon the business of life.” —1894 advertisement in the Stanford Daily

1955

1972

1979

1992

Miss Harker’s School becomes coeducational. It drops its high school program and is renamed Harker Day School.

Palo Alto Military Academy and Harker Day School merge and move to the Mother Butler High School property in San Jose. The school changes its name to Harker Academy, serving children in kindergarten through grade 9.

The optional military program and grade 9 are dropped from Harker Academy. Middle school students travel to the Yosemite Institute, beginning an annual tradition of combining academic study with physical activity in one of the nation’s treasured national parks.

The school name is changed to The Harker School.

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THE HARKER SCHOOL CELEBRATES 125 YEARS

Even though much has changed for Harker in 125 years, much has stayed the same. The Harker School retains the core philosophy of its original incarnations as Manzanita Hall and Miss Harker’s School: to provide students with the knowledge, insight, skills and experience they need to succeed at the nation’s best colleges and universities and become leaders for the common good.

Reflecting on the past Harker is grounded in both Manzanita Hall, a college preparatory school for boys, and Miss Harker’s School for Girls, which was founded to prepare young women for lives of leadership and service; both schools were founded with the chief aim of preparing students for entrance to Stanford University. Manzanita Hall first welcomed young men of promise to begin their educations in the private home of Reverend W.D. Bishop on Waverly Street in Palo Alto, eventually moving to a building at Harriet and Parkinson avenues in the late 1890s. Miss Harker’s School opened its doors at Castilleja Hall at the corner of Kingsley and Bryant streets in Palo Alto. Early descriptions of the two schools showcase Harker’s historical commitment to academic excellence and personal character development. An advertisement for Manzanita Hall in the Stanford Daily’s April 1894 issue stated, “Its courses

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are so thorough that a course in the School insures sound culture to those who intend to enter upon the business of life.” Eugene Sawyer’s 1922 book on the history of Santa Clara County described the aim of Miss Harker’s School for Girls: “To build up vigorous physical health, to achieve the best possible intellectual advancement, and to secure for each pupil the moral and spiritual development which will enable her to take her place among intellectual and cultured people, and to live a rounded and useful life.” Harker has remained constant to those missions, creating an environment that promotes academic rigor and physical and moral fitness, while inspiring intellectual curiosity to instill a lifelong love of learning in its students. In 1919, Manzanita Hall dropped its college prep program and was transformed into the Palo Alto Military Academy (PAMA) for elementary-age boys, offering both day and boarding options for cadets in grades 1-9. PAMA maintained the same primary building of Manzanita Hall on Parkinson Avenue. In 1920, the academy opened Camp Eldorado at Lake Alpine in the Sierra Nevada mountains so that boys could spend their summers in recreational activities such as archery, hiking, fishing, horseback riding and rifle practice. PAMA also held Harker’s

1993

1998

2002

2013

The global education program begins, sending students around the world to connect classroom learning with hands-on experiences in the field. Harker celebrates its centennial anniversary.

The Bucknall Road campus is purchased for a lower school and the Saratoga Avenue campus is transformed to include an upper school, beginning with grade 9 students. One class per year is added until 2002, when the school fully serves students in grades 9-12.

The Harker boarding program closes, ending an era of serving approximately 1,400 school-year and 2,100 summer boarding students. The dorms are remodeled for dining and renamed Manzanita Hall. The first upper school students graduate.

The Union Avenue campus is purchased in order to eventually unwind from our Blackford Avenue lease. In the meantime, Harker opens a preschool for children ages 3-5 on that campus.

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and Greenwood avenues. It continued as a school for girls until 1955, when it welcomed boys and was renamed Harker Day School. PAMA and the day school merged in 1972 and then moved to San Jose to become Harker Academy. A year later, the military program was dropped and the academy turned its focus to expanding its academic and extracurricular offerings. The school changed its name to The Harker School in 1992, reflecting its commitment to top quality education for kindergarten through grade 8. In 1998, Harker expanded to include high school students, graduating its first class in 2002, the same year the boarding program was eliminated. A preschool was added in 2013 and today, The Harker School is a beacon of educational excellence in Silicon Valley, comprising a preschool, lower school, middle school and upper school on four campuses on four streets in San Jose: Union, Bucknall, Blackford and Saratoga.

first Family Picnic in 1950, an annual tradition that continues today as the Family & Alumni Picnic, now in its 68th year. PAMA and Miss Harker’s School existed across the way from each other for years, with Miss Harker’s located since 1907 on 6 acres at Harriet

2017

2018

2018-19

The new athletic complex opens, featuring a 12,000-square-foot gymnasium, athletic training room with advanced hydrotherapy unit and spacious team rooms.

The state-of-the-art Rothschild Performing Arts Center opens, featuring a 450-seat theater with fly loft and hydraulic orchestra pit, a scene shop, vocal, instrumental, theater/ musical theater classrooms and dressing rooms.

Harker celebrates the completion of its 125th year.

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THE HARKER SCHOOL CELEBRATES 125 YEARS

A spirit of intellectual curiosity and service to others The school’s exceptional faculty has always brought passion and expertise to the classroom, beginning with its founders, Frank Cramer and Catherine Harker, who both earned advanced degrees.

From Harker’s earliest days, teachers have played a critical role in shaping the intellectual and personal growth of thousands of students. The school’s exceptional faculty has always brought passion and expertise to the classroom, beginning with its founders, Frank Cramer and Catherine Harker, who both earned advanced degrees. Miss Harker’s School was renowned for its excellent faculty of 18 to 20 women of the highest academic credentials. At Manzanita Hall, the professional teachers were specialists in their departments, thoroughly trained in what a college preparatory education required. Throughout its history, Harker has searched nationwide for the best teachers, many of whom hold the highest degrees in their fields. Today, Harker’s teachers pursue extensive professional development to enrich their skills and directly impact student learning, using grants awarded through the Teacher Excellence Program, founded in 2015 by parents Raju and Bala Vegesna. Harker also stands out for its commitment to innovation in the classroom. Beginning as early as grade 1, students learn from teachers who are subject specialists, tapping into student interests to help them develop into well-rounded, inquisitive individuals. Beyond their academic pursuits, Harker students have long been recognized for their kindness, respect and compassion for others, a natural outgrowth of Harker’s historical emphasis on serving its community. The 1928-29 catalog for Miss Harker’s School stated: “... by entering into the welfare of other lives with sympathy and helpfulness, [students] will become a power for good” in their homes and communities. Girls at the founding school raised money for many charities, including the Stanford Home for Convalescent Children and the Red Cross Children’s Relief Fund. PAMA and Harker Academy students also earned a reputation for service, including an award in 1978 for participation in the March of Dimes Walkathon.

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Today, participation in community service is woven into the Harker experience at all ages, with more than 300 nonprofit programs supported by students through fundraisers, advocacy and awareness campaigns and volunteerism.

The modern era Just as Frank Cramer and Catherine Harker opened college preparatory schools to fill an educational need in the Palo Alto community near the turn of the 20th century, so too did Howard and Diana Nichols for Silicon Valley at the turn of the 21st. Their vision of academic excellence, combined with solid business acumen, helped to launch Harker’s upper school in 1998, bringing secondary education back to Harker for the first time since the 1950s and moving the school into the modern era. By 1992, The Harker School was a leading independent school for students in kindergarten through grade 8 on the Saratoga Avenue campus. It had left behind all markings of the military academy it once was. A year later, The Harker School celebrated its 100th anniversary, championing its vibrant and caring educational community. But one piece was still missing – that of a high-quality, non-religious private secondary school, which had been identified as a need in the Bay Area by a survey of Harker’s parents. Just two years after the Nicholses and Harker’s board of trustees began pursuing the feasibility of expanding Harker into high school education, the Bucknall Road campus had been purchased and the lower school had been moved to that location. The Saratoga site was transformed to include a top-notch upper school, enrolling a full class of grade 9 students in its first year (1998), and adding the remaining grades one year at a time. The first seniors graduated in 2002, and will always fondly

“... by entering into the welfare of other lives with sympathy and helpfulness, [students] will become a power for good” in their homes and communities. — 1928-29 Miss Harker’s School catalog

be known as Harker’s “first class.” The middle schoolers remained at Saratoga Avenue until they moved to the Blackford Avenue campus in 2005. From its humble beginnings in 1893 to its latest expansion into preschool education in 2013, Harker has blossomed into a world-class institution for students ages 3 to 18 and is considered Northern California’s premier private educational institution.

Today’s students benefit from Harker’s outstanding academic environment and emphasis on strong personal character, its exceptional faculty, and its unrivaled opportunities for extracurricular activities that promote teamwork and leadership. Nestled in Silicon Valley and surrounded by a spirit of innovation, Harker is poised to move forward with its promise to prepare students for global citizenship, looking ahead to its next 125 years of creating the very best learning environment for its students.

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Our Founders

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ear the turn of the 20th century, three individuals had the foresight and fortitude to begin and lead two schools dedicated to the academic and moral development of young people. They founded

Manzanita Hall and Miss Harker’s School, the eventual union of which became The Harker School.

Frank Cramer Frank Cramer, a pioneer educator and civic leader with a lifelong interest in the sciences, was one of the earliest residents of Palo Alto. He graduated from Lawrence University in Appleton, Wis., in 1886, and taught in Wisconsin for several years before moving to California to continue his education at Stanford University, from which he earned a master’s degree in zoology in 1893. While Cramer was at Stanford, he was encouraged to start a college preparatory school for boys by Stanford’s first president, David Starr Jordan, who was concerned about the fledgling university’s need for superior incoming students. Cramer founded Manzanita Hall – briefly called the Palo Alto Preparatory School for Boys – in 1893 as a day and boarding school for boys. As its owner and principal, Cramer placed recruiting advertisements in newspapers across the country, promising – upon successful completion of the school’s rigorous curriculum – entrance to Stanford without examination, as students at Manzanita Hall were thoroughly prepared for university work. By the fall of 1894, the school had enrolled 40 boys.

FRANK CRAMER Founder of Manzanita Hall 1893-1902 “Santa Clara Valley is literally the land of flowers, fruit and sunshine. Baseball, football and tennis the year round. Educational trips to the wonders of California. Only manly boys with highest recommendations taken.” – From a 1901 advertisement placed by Cramer

J. LEROY DIXON Head of Manzanita Hall 1902-1919 “Manzanita Hall is in the Santa Clara Valley where there is every incentive to work. … [The school] prepares for Eastern Universities as well as Stanford. A growing school for growing boys.” – From a 1906 advertisement Dixon placed in “The Sunset”

The Harker Sisters Catherine Harker, a native of Portland, Ore., and a graduate of Vassar College, recognized the need for a preparatory school for girls near Stanford University, as did David Starr Jordan. In 1902, she founded Miss Harker’s School for Girls, which emphasized exceptional scholarship, character and leadership. Its motto of “Non ministrari, sed ministrare,” meaning “Not to be ministered unto, but to minister,” reflected a commitment to serving the common good that continues at The Harker School today. In addition to her administrative duties, Harker taught Latin and mathematics, drawing on her previous teaching posts at Curtner Seminary and Mills College. Sara Harker, an accomplished pianist and violinist with interests in business, travel and humanitarian work, arrived in Palo Alto in 1907 to become a silent business partner at her older sister’s school. She also was director of its music program. In 1931, she became principal of Miss Harker’s lower school. After Catherine’s untimely death of a heart attack on school grounds in 1938, Sara became headmistress of Miss Harker’s School, continuing in that post until her retirement at the age of 84 in 1952.

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COL. RICHARD P. KELLY Superintendent of Palo Alto Military Academy 1919-1950 “We enroll boys of five or six years to fourteen or fifteen – grammar grades only – no high school. You can easily understand what this means if your boy is young. He will find here the friendliness and sympathy of a good home, combined with a discipline not surpassed in any school. He will find a larger variety of interests suitable to boys of his age than he ever had before.” In a parent letter dated Sept. 1, 1925

The Heads of Harker CATHERINE HARKER Founder of Miss Harker’s School 1902-1938

ALICE WILLIAMS Principal of Harker Day School 1955-1979

“A meticulous scholar whose daily lessons were carefully organized … and who reassured her students with a contagiously delightful sense of humor.” – From “The Echo,” Miss Harker’s School yearbook

“Through the years many teachers here helped to create the spirit of the school. The staff and faculty always work toward the ideal of true scholarship and moral integrity.” – From the October 1971 Harker Barker, the Harker Day School newspaper

SARA HARKER Head of Miss Harker’s School 1938-1952

MAJ. DONALD NICHOLS Superintendent of Palo Alto Military Academy/ Harker Day School/Harker Academy 1950-1973

“Her leadership is one of enthusiasm, sincerity, and high ideals. … She places strong emphasis upon high academic standards, but above all, she values the building of character.” – At the 50th anniversary celebration of Miss Harker’s School

LAURA SIMPSON Academic Head MARY WATEROUS Administrative Head of Miss Harker’s School 1952-1955

“Where else could you find a combination mascotwatchdog for 112 boys?” – Nichols, about his dogs Ajax, Babo, Hokie, Klute and Dutch, who were affectionately cared for by PAMA cadets throughout the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s

HOWARD NICHOLS President of Harker Academy/The Harker School 1973-2005 “Our vision has always been to build the best school in the world. I don’t know if anyone can claim that distinction, but we certainly know we are one of the best, and we are only going to get better.” – At the dedication of Nichols Hall, 2009

CHRISTOPHER NIKOLOFF Head of The Harker School 2005-2017 “We’re tremendously proud of our century-old tradition of excellence in education, and the international recognition our students, faculty and programs have earned. We believe the best way to prepare our students is to provide the best academic and extracurricular programs possible.” – At the 2016 Night on the Town Gala

DIANA NICHOLS Head of The Harker School 1992-2005 “In only a few years, Diana has taken this new high school to national prominence in college admission. It’s a truly remarkable achievement and she’s an outstanding leader.” – Sandy Padgett, director of college counseling, at Diana’s retirement in 2005

BRIAN YAGER Head of The Harker School 2017-PRESENT “While reflecting on our past, we are also excited about what the future holds for our students. We look forward to proudly joining together as a community with a clear vision of each of our important roles in ensuring a world-class education for our students for the next 125 years.”

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THE

Nichols Legacy T

he Nichols family provided leadership at Harker for more than 50 years and its impact on the school is immeasurable. Maj. Donald Nichols, a 1926 graduate of Palo Alto Military Academy, purchased and became superintendent of PAMA in 1950. He transformed Miss Harker’s School for Girls into a coeducational day school in the late 1950s, merged it with PAMA, changed its name to Harker Academy and moved it to San Jose in 1972. Maj. Nichols’ son, Howard, grew up at Harker. He graduated from PAMA in 1956 and attended Palo Alto High School before earning a business degree from Stanford University. He returned to Harker as a staff member in 1965 and took over leadership of the Harker Academy from his father in 1973. He and his wife, Diana Nichols, who served as a science teacher, principal and head of school, were the heart and soul of Harker, building it into a

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prestigious academic powerhouse. Under their leadership, Harker expanded to include high school education in 1998. Nichols Hall, Harker’s science and technology building, is named in their honor. Howard Nichols passed away in 2008. Diana Nichols, who championed personal development, science and technology, and global education programs at Harker, spoke recently about the family’s experience at Harker. Her comments are paraphrased.

How did you and Howard foster a positive teaching and learning environment at Harker? We wanted to create academic excellence, so we hired the best teachers we could find who were experts in the subjects they taught, even at the elementary level. Teaching is connected to caring about the child, because what happens in the classroom is the single most important thing at the school.

How has Harker’s location in Silicon Valley influenced the school? One of the smartest things Harker has done is take advantage of the area’s brilliant people who are doing cutting-edge things. It’s been tremendous for our students to interact with people who are changing the world.

What is the most significant contribution you and Howard made to Harker? It was our firm belief that children should be treated with love and caring. It’s our responsibility to provide them with opportunities to discover who they are and what brings them joy. We tried hard to set that tone, to let the children know we valued and respected them, and that in turn they should respect other humans.

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Howard Nichols rides into the 2002 Family & Alumni Picnic.

Cindy (Kerr) Ellis reads to Harker Academy boarding students in the 1980s. Alice Williams, Howard Nichols and Phyllis Carley - the trio who kept Harker Academy going! Shown here in 1979.

! s e i r o m e M Fun

Downbeat rocks the runway at the 2008 fashion show, “Global Grooves.”

The inaugural upper school class celebrates graduation on their senior trip to the Hotel Del Coronado in San Diego.

The 2008 Family & Alumni Picnic’s amazing parent volunteer team.

While attending the Palo Alto Military Academy, chief bugler William Talbot, Jr. won a Northern California bugling championship in 1932.

Santa, Mrs. Claus and their reindeer drop in to the 1981 Christmas program. So cute!

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Pat Walsh keeps students rapt in 1978-79. Current elementary division head Kristin Giammona ‘81 is to Walsh’s right.

Veteran ESL teacher Harriet Skapinsky in the classroom in 1982-83.

Beloved art teacher Margaret Peterson works her magic in 1988. Margaret Conway, shown here circa 1961-63, was a longtime grade 3 teacher at PAMA and Harker Academy.

Do you recognize Sarah Leonard? This photo shows our current primary division head in her grade 1 classroom in 1976.

This photo includes Class of ‘89’ers David Owens, Curtis Manning and Cinnamon Davis. Can you name any more?

This photo, from the Miss Harker’s School brochure in 1950-51, is labeled “South Lawn.” What do you think they’re doing?

Clara Blickenstaff ‘11 models a dress made by Priya Bhikha ‘10 from recycled materials at the 2010 fashion show, “Outside the Box.”

Our 1963 P.E. classes included archery. Who knew?

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Signature Programs Throughout its history, Harker has offered programs both inside and outside the classroom that have the power to transform the student experience.

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Performing Arts Harker has long valued the performing arts as integral to education, with the school producing more than 70 annual theater, dance, instrumental and vocal performances. Opportunities are available at every age. For example, Harker began hosting a junior high school drama festival in 1981, which has now developed into annual plays produced by both grade 6 and grades 7-8. And since 1996 students in grade 2 have reenacted fairytales at the Ogre Awards ceremony. Dance has been part of the curriculum since the late 1980s, and has had a prominent place in summer programs, after-school activities and annual Maypole celebrations for decades; the annual middle school show, Dance Jamz, has been going strong since 2005. Instrumental and vocal music opportunities abound, from orchestra to jazz band to musical theater to show choir to a cappella groups. The Harker Conservatory, established in 1998, cultivates students’ artistic talents and its unique Student Directed Showcase began in 2001 to give selected seniors the chance to produce shows and direct their peers.

Athletics Physical fitness has always been emphasized at Harker, with baseball, football and tennis offered year-round at Manzanita Hall. Miss Harker’s School built a gymnasium in 1921 to accompany its outdoor fields for tennis, basketball and baseball. PAMA cadets enjoyed year-round outdoor sports such as swimming, boating, bicycling and horseback riding. Today, Harker provides developmental, intramural and competitive athletic opportunities for every skill level: nine sports at the lower school, 13 at the middle school and 15 at the upper school. Nearly 70 percent of students in grades 4-12 participate in Harker’s sports program.

Business & Entrepreneurship Harker’s comprehensive business & entrepreneurship program, formed in 2013, supports student innovators by leveraging the school’s Silicon Valley location. In 2010, students founded TEDxHarkerSchool, an annual conference that features professional and student speakers, mentors and corporate booths, allowing students to learn from and be inspired by Silicon Valley’s culture of innovation. Harker DECA, founded in the 2007-08 school year, prepares students in the business areas of marketing, finance, hospitality and management and has won many state, national and international honors. Harker founded one of the nation’s first high school incubator programs in 2017.

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SIGNATURE PROGRAMS

Research and Innovation Harker developed a student scientific research program in 2001, celebrating students’ achievements at an annual research symposium beginning in 2006. Students have embraced hands-on research opportunities, finding success at the national level in programs such as the Siemens Competition and the Intel Science Talent Search. The John Near Excellence in History Education Endowment Fund, established in 2009, and the Mitra Family Endowment for the Humanities, established in 2011, support student research in the humanities. Harker’s robotics team was started by students in 2001 and enjoyed its most successful season in 2016-17, advancing to the semifinals in two regional competitions. Howard and Diana Nichols were visionaries in a real sense, with Diana Nichols owning and driving an electric car back in the ‘80s. The car was used as a teaching tool for both ecological responsibility and the science of a functioning electric vehicle.

Global Education Harker’s partnership with Japan’s Tamagawa Academy started in 1992, allowing for academic collaboration and exchange visits between the schools’ middle school students. Other partnerships followed with schools around the world, including one with Shanghai’s World Foreign Language Middle School in 2003. Today, students starting in grade 4 participate in more than a dozen school-sponsored trips, first within California, then throughout the United States and internationally as students age.

Journalism First established as a student club, Harker’s journalism program became part of the upper school curriculum in 2004. The program, responsible for the school newspaper, yearbook and student news website, is nationally recognized, garnering top awards from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. In 2008, the program expanded to include summer work retreats, taking students to pursue journalism in other locales.

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Speech and Debate The middle and upper school speech and debate teams, whose members have won national awards, teach high-level research skills, critical thinking and leadership. In 2008, a middle school speech and debate duo won the Novice High School Division at the Santa Clara University Invitational. It was the only middle school team at the event. Harker’s middle school debate team has continued to compete against high schoolers and in 2010 claimed the 2010 National Junior Forensic League championship in public forum debate. The team has been going strong ever since. The upper school speech and debate team has won numerous accolades over the years, including national championships in three out of the four events at the National Debate Coaches Association Championship in 2014. In 2016, Harker won the top Overall School of Excellence Award for the fifth consecutive year at the National Speech & Debate Association championship in Salt Lake City. In 2018, Harker qualified 18 students to the national championships.

Summer Programs Palo Alto Military Academy offered summer enrichment programs of academics, military drills and exercise at the recreational Camp Eldorado in the Sierra Nevada mountains from 1920 to 1952. Summer programs have continued to emphasize both academic and physical enrichment – from swimming and archery to dance and drama. In the 1990s, Harker began offering extended summer trips to sites throughout California. Today, Harker’s summer programs include the academically focused Summer Institute, and programs in sports and music.

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Achievement Highlights Here are some of the many remarkable milestones and accomplishments achieved at Harker. General • Nichols Hall on the upper school campus was the first LEED Gold certified school facility in Santa Clara County.

Academics • In 2007, Harker’s team was chosen from among 63 teams nationwide to represent the United States at the J8 Summit, a parallel youth event to the G8 (Group of Eight) Summit. J8 delegates met faceto-face with President Bush and the leaders of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia and the United Kingdom. • Thirty students have been nominated for the U.S. Presidential Scholars Program; five have been selected as Presidential Scholars. • Harker students have earned 184 National Merit Scholarships since 2006. • Since 2010, Harker students have taken 11,453 AP exams, with 66 percent (7,540) achieving perfect scores of five and 89 percent earning scores of four or higher. 18

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• Harker has produced many stellar mathematicians including one graduate who earned a Ph.D. from MIT and is now a fellow in the math department at Columbia University. Another has been awarded a Soros Fellowship and Harvard’s David Mumford Undergraduate Mathematics Prize.

Contests • Since 2006, Harker has had 85 semifinalists – and three winners – in the Intel/Regeneron Science Talent Search (first place in 2015 and second places in 2006 and 2010). In 2015, Harker had 15 semifinalists, the most of any school in the United States. In 2017, Harker had three finalists, the most of any school in the country. • In 2009, two Harker students and a Harker alumnus earned the top spots in the level four category at the National Japan Bowl in Washington, D.C. For their accomplishment, the team and an upper school Japanese teacher were awarded a trip to Japan to see the country and meet Her Imperial Highness Princess Takamado.

ACHIEVEMENT HIGHLIGHTS

• At the U.S. Invitational Young Physicists Tournament, Harker students earned first place in 2011, 2014 and 2015; had a finalist in 2016; placed third in 2017; and placed second in 2018.

• Two students attended the International Math Olympiad training camp in 2013. In 2016, an alumnus earned a gold medal.

• In 2005, five out of eight qualifying teams at the state finals of the Future Problem Solving Program International were from Harker, the most any school had qualified at that time. Two were upper school teams and three were lower school teams.

• A student was a finalist at the 2016 USA Biology Olympiad.

In 2006, Harker teams took six of the eight possible spots in the state finals, including the only high school team to qualify for the state finals. Two middle school teams qualified for the international finals, and Harker provided four of the eight individual finalists to internationals.

• A student earned a bronze medal at the 2009 China Girls Mathematical Olympiad.

Athletics • In 2007, Harker’s varsity girls volleyball team won the NorCal championship and took second at state. • In 2014, the boys varsity basketball team reached the CCS finals.

In 2007, the Harker middle school qualified four of the eight teams to the state finals and provided five of the top eight finishing individuals, then went on to win the international championship.

• In 2017, the varsity boys golf team took second place in its league, was the NorCal champion and took fifth at state. The golf team was the league champion for four consecutive years.

• Students earned gold medals in 2004, 2009, 2010, 2014 and 2016, and two silver medals in 2016 at the International Physics Olympiad.

• In 2017, Harker’s varsity football team went undefeated until the playoff semifinals. The team’s final 11-1 tally is a school record.

• At the International Linguistics Olympiad, Harker qualified three students each year in 2009, 2011 and 2012. They earned silver in 2009 and gold in 2012. • A student on the International Math Olympiad team in 2006 won a silver medal; another student participated in 2008 and another was invited to summer training camp in 2016.

• In 2018, Harker’s varsity boys soccer team racked up a 14-13 record for the season, remaining undefeated until the last regular season game. • Harker students hold individual league championships in swimming (2010, 2015, 2017), track and field (2013, 2016), cross country (2013) and wrestling (2011).

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ACHIEVEMENT HIGHLIGHTS

• In addition, Harker teams have won many scholastic championships based on team GPAs. • Harker athletes have made it to the pros in a variety of sports including golf, volleyball, baseball and soccer.

Performing Arts • Each year, the Harker Conservatory presents both a fall play and a spring musical. Shows have included “Anon(ymous),” “You Can’t Take it with You,” “Urinetown” and “Pippin.” The Harker Conservatory sent troupes to Scotland to perform in the worldrenowned Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2007, 2011 and 2015. • The Harker School Orchestra was the top scoring orchestra at the 2010 Los Angeles Festival of Gold, performed in London’s Cadogan Hall (home of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra) in 2012, took the gold award at the Chicago International Music Festival in 2014 and performed in New York’s Carnegie Hall in 2017. • In 2007, the Grade 7-8 Orchestra was given a superior rating at the California Music Educators Association ensemble festival. At the same festival, the upper school choral group Cantilena earned its first of many unanimous superior ratings. • Harker has at least two dozen upper school alumni active in performing arts, several professionally. One alumna founded

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her own Shakespeare company in New York. Another has found success acting in TV series including “Dear White People.” One grad is a full-time opera singer, and one a pop singer.

Business and Leadership • A mixed team from DECA and Talon, the yearbook, won the nationwide 2018 Herff Jones Marketing Results Challenge, which was to create marketing campaigns to increase yearbook awareness and sales on campus. • A 2015 senior earned first place in the Western region and third in the nation in DECA’s The Stock Market Game. • The middle school’s DECA Idea Challenge team, Insulator Warrior Inc., were global finalists in 2018. • In 2014, following an illustrious career as a lawyer for the U.S. Justice Department, a Harker alumnus was confirmed to a seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. • One of Time’s “100 Most Influential People” in the artists category, a popular fashion designer attended our middle school, where he learned to sew. Now running his own design house, he has won many awards and was creative director for Balenciaga. His clothing is carried in more than 700 stores including Bloomingdale’s, Barneys New York and Neiman Marcus.

• A 2010 graduate co-founded DoorDash, a successful ondemand food delivery company. He was named to Forbes prestigious “30 Under 30” list in January 2015. • The founder of nVision, a medical devices company formed to provide better heath care for women, graduated from Harker in 2003. In 2014, Forbes named her to their “30 Under 30” list in the medical category.

Speech and Debate Harker has one of the largest and most successful speech and debate teams in the country. Students have won multiple national championships and the program is one of the only ones to have repeatedly won sweepstakes awards for teamwide success at the National Speech & Debate Association National Championship, Tournament of Champions and the largest invitational of the year at the University of California, Berkeley.

• In 2003, in its second year in publication, the middle school literary magazine, Enlight’ning, earned a silver medal from CSPA. It earned a gold medal in 2005 and the Gold Crown award in 2008. • In 2010, the Winged Post and its online website, talonwp.com, won the CSPA’s Gold Crown award for its excellence in writing, coverage and content. • In 2015, the Winged Post was nominated for a Crown Award and received 10 Gold Circle Awards for news articles. • In 2017, both the Winged Post and HELM, the upper school literary magazine, were named Crown Finalists by the CSPA, and seven Gold Circle Awards were received for news articles.

Student Publications • Harker’s upper school student publications, the Winged Post newspaper and Aquila online news site, have received multiple awards from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA). H AR KE R MAG A Z INE l 125T H ANNIV E R SARY SPECIA L ISSUE

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Giving Back who has battled cancer. The students raised $14,000 in 2016.

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arker’s historical commitment to developing students into compassionate human beings who make a difference in their communities is showcased in its many annual outreach programs. At any given time, individual students as well as student-run clubs are organizing drives and reaching out to help local and global organizations. Some of their efforts include sending thank you cards to active service members, adopting families at the holidays, spearheading blood drives, collecting items for the Humane Society, and so much more.

Cancer Walk and Kicks Against Cancer Two fundraisers benefit cancer organizations. Since 2006, middle school students have participated in a Cancer Walk. They learn about different forms of cancer and prevention strategies, and then take part in the walk, each holding a flag honoring a person of his or her choice 22

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Upper school students host soccer games, sell T-shirts and baked goods, and plan other fun activities during Kicks Against Cancer to raise funds for Camp Okizu, a summer program that offers support and recreational activities for children with cancer. The event began in 2010 and raised $2,756 in 2018.

Food Drives Lower school students collect nonperishable food and other goods, supplying about 300 bags of food per year plus many thousands of dollars in cash to St. Justin’s Community Ministry Pantry over the 30-plus years the program has been going. Middle and upper school students collect canned goods at Thanksgiving in partnership with Second Harvest Food Bank.

Freshman Service Day Recent projects for grade 9 students have included trail cleanup at the Coyote Open Space Preserve and Guadalupe River Park Conservancy, and volunteering at the Humane Society of Silicon Valley, San Jose Rose Garden, Sacred Heart Community Services and Sunrise Village Emergency Shelter, among other organizations.

Jump Rope for Heart Each year, lower school students collect pledges for their Jump Rope for Heart activity, to benefit the American Heart Assocation. It’s a great effort for the students and they have raised nearly $200,000 since the activity started in 2000.

Community Participation Along with its charitable outreach, Harker welcomes those from its greater communities – the neighborhoods it shares, students and teachers from other schools, and fans of great speakers and music. • In 1999, Harker initiated The Harker Invitational Debate Tournament, the first Harker-sponsored event to draw upper school students from other schools. By its fifth year, the event drew teams from 20 schools from California, Oregon and Nevada. • The middle school has held the Diana Nichols Math Invitational since 2001. In 2018, about 300 students from 13 schools attended. • Each year, Harker hosts the Silicon Valley Computer-Using Educators conference on the upper school campus. Hundreds of teachers and administrators from all over Silicon Valley attend the conference. In addition, each summer, Harker’s technology department hosts teachers from around the Bay Area at the Harker Teacher Institute to hear speakers and attend workshops on classroom technology and other topics. • In 2004, Harker joined Common Ground, a coalition of Bay Area schools working together to provide parent education to their communities, and hosts one or two speakers per year. • In 2011, Harker students organized, promoted and hosted their first TEDx conference at Harker. This was the first student-organized and promoted conference and it was a resounding success, with speakers of world-class caliber. The event has been held every year since, and about 175 students attended in November 2017.

• The Harker Speaker Series launched in March 2008 and brings leaders and visionaries from a wide variety of fields to share their expertise or unique experiences with both Harker and the greater community. Speakers have included author Khaled Hosseini, travel guru Rick Steves, Jill Tarter, director of Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence research at the SETI Institute, and astronaut Gregory Chamitoff. • The Harker Concert Series began in 2011 with a concert by the MarcOlivia Duo. Other acts have included San Jose Opera, Taylor Eigsti, the Gerald Clayton Trio and Afiara String Quartet. • While most Harker performances are open to the public, Harker musicians and performers also share their talents with the greater community with regular performances at senior centers, shopping centers and festivals.

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125 Fun Facts About Harker Here is a sampling of the 125 facts about Harker that you’ll find on our website. Visit www.harker.org/about/history/125-facts to test yourself on the rest!

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4 What was the original use of our current Harker Bistro in Manzanita Hall?

It was the chapel when the school was the Mother Butler High School. The “altar” can still be seen as the raised area where the salad bar now resides.

30 Who founded Miss Harker’s School at the suggestion of Stanford president David Starr Jordan?

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Catherine Harker, a Vassar graduate and professor of Greek and Latin at Mills College.

33 Which future headmaster of Harker Academy

graduated from Stanford University and served in the army? Howard Nichols, who also attended Palo Alto Military Academy. Mr. Nichols worked at PAMA and led Harker Academy and The Harker School until his retirement in 2005. He is the coach pictured at left.

46 Harker began its international exchange

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program in 1996 with what school?

The Tamagawa Gakuen school in Tamagawa, Japan. The exchange agreement was signed on Dec. 5, 1996.

47 The Palo Alto Military Academy had a mascot. Which dog breeds did leader Major Nichols prefer?

The dogs were always English mastiffs or St. Bernards. The mascot rode “shotgun” with Major Nichols in his Jeep.

60 What was a beloved holiday tradition enjoyed by the boarding students?

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School president Mr. Nichols would read ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas while a holiday fire blazed on the big screen TV.

89 What was the motto of Miss Harker’s School? “Non Ministrari, Sed Ministrari” - “Not to be served unto, but to serve.” We share this motto with Wellesley College.

116 What are the opening words to The Harker School Song?

The song begins, “Flame of knowledge lights our way.” It was written by former lower school music teacher David Len Allen in 2001. 24

HA R K E R MAGA Z I NE l 125T H A N N I V E RS A RY S P E C I A L I S S U E

Our History Online

This commemorative issue captures the highlights of Harker’s fascinating past.

events

Visit www.harker.org/about/history for lots more!

facts

video channel

place to share memories

timeline

www.harker.org/about/history

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I Summer Programs www.harker.org

Preschool

w w w.har ker.org

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news.har ker.org

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