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rev. 10/11

Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary E1111 Foundations of Educational Leadership

Number of Credit Hours:

3

Grade Type: A/F Prerequisites: None Required for degree(s): MAEL, DEL Listed Faculty: Dr. Gainey, Dr. Kelly Course Template Approval/Revision Date: 9/11

COURSE DESCRIPTION This course is an introduction to the concepts and principles of Christian educational leadership. It provides students with a context in which they may formulate their own personal philosophy of Christian education as they consider the biblical, theological, historical, philosophical, and sociological foundation of Christian educational leadership.

REQUIRED COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES 1. Students will demonstrate Christ-likeness through application of personal Bible study by establishing (or continuing) a commitment to personal Bible study by keeping a daily journal of biblical insights. (J2; MAEL DO2) 2. Students will demonstrate Christ-likeness through interaction within the Christian community by discovering their role within the local body of believers, submitting to authority, and exercising their spiritual gifts. (J3, C6; MAEL DO2). 3. By analyzing various foundational perspectives, students will demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical base for Christian educational leadership within diverse contexts (F11; MAEL DO3). 4. Students will analyze cultural and ethnic perspectives of Christian education as an important dimension of understanding of the theoretical base for Christian educational leadership (M17, R19; MAEL DO3)

REQUIRED COURSE COMPONENTS The following "required course components" MUST be incorporated into the course assignments in all offerings of this course. Additional course components may be added by the instructor. For each hour of academic credit, course components requiring approximately 15 hours of classroom activities and 25-30 hours of outside activities must be indicated. Courses designed for hybrid or online delivery must include a comparable level of course work. 1.

The student will be exposed to the following basic information: • Educational systems of ancient civilizations (Greek, Roman, Hebrew) upon the development of Christian education. • Old Testament patterns of Religious Education. • New Testament Christian educational practices.



Key representative leaders in Christian educational movements throughout the history of the Church.

2.

The student will be expected to master the following skills: • Integration of Philosophical Concepts. • Critical Thinking.

3.

The student will be expected to develop a conceptual framework for the following subject area/discipline: • Historical models of Christian educational practices. • Elements of philosophical formation as related to Christian education. • Contemporary cultural trends impacting the church.

4.

The student will demonstrate affective growth in the following areas: • Appreciation of the historical contributions to the present practice of educational leadership in the church. • Commitment to the necessity of formulating a Christian educational leadership philosophical model. • Valuing of the Bible as the basis for implementing Christian educational practices. • Valuing the Bible for personal growth. • Valuing involvement in the church to enhance the Christian community.

MANDATORY ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES GGBTS engages in regular assessment of its academic programs. Student participation is essential to this process through the following three activities. 1. ePortfolio Reflections - All degree-seeking students must reflect on the work completed as part of required courses by commenting upon the manner in which the course contributed to his/her growth in relation to five Essential Leadership Characteristics selected by the student and referenced in the syllabus under Course Learning Outcomes. These reflections must be recorded in the student's ePortfolio and a copy emailed to the professor no later than the last scheduled meeting of the class. 2. CoursEval Assessments – Each semester a link to a CoursEval survey for each course taken will appear in the student's MyGGBTS page. Students are required to complete this online evaluation of course/instructor no later than the last scheduled meeting of the class. A summary of results (without student ID) is released to the professor only after grades have been submitted for the course. 3. ePortfolio Artifacts – The syllabi of certain courses identify specific assignments which the student will both turn in to the professor for a grade AND attach to their ePortfolio as a "learning artifact." The institution reviews these artifacts as a way of judging the effectiveness of the Seminary's academic program. The review normally occurs after the student's graduation and without reference to student identity. Students are encouraged to remove title page or header/footer containing their name prior to attaching the artifact to their ePortfolio.

Seminary Policy on Academic Credit and Workload Expectations For each hour of academic credit granted for a GGBTS face-to-face, hybrid or online course, the Seminary assigns a workload of approximately 45 clock hours of academic learning activities per academic credit hour earned. Traditional in- class format normally apportions 15 hours of in-class instruction and 30 hours of instructional exercises to be completed outside of class meetings per credit hour granted. For androgogical reasons, individual courses may adjust the ratio of assignments inside and outside class meetings. REQUIRED ASSESSMENT MECHANISMS Course Artifact: Philosophy of Educational Leadership Students will develop an eight-to-ten page philosophy of educational leadership in the church. Their philosophy will integrate the theological, biblical, historical, philosophical, and sociological foundation s into a practical statement of the meaning and purpose of educational leadership in the church. The philosophy will also explore the student’s personal preparation for leadership of education in the Church through Bible study and church investment. Suggested Evaluation Rubric: Categories Biblical basis for their philosophy +15% Theological basis for their philosophy +15% Philosophy informed by historical background +15%

Below Expectations

Meets Minimal Expectations

Exceeds Expectation

Far exceeds Expectation

Vague or inappropriate biblical concepts addressed Vague or inappropriate theological concepts addressed Vague or inappropriate application

One clearly articulated biblical concept

Two clearly articulated biblical concepts

Three or more clearly articulated biblical concepts

One clearly articulated theological concept One clearly articulated historical idea applied to contemporary Christian education Clear discussion of one philosophical approach to education applied to contemporary Christian education

Two clearly articulated theological concepts Two clearly articulated historical ideas applied to contemporary Christian education Clear discussion of two philosophical approaches to education applied to contemporary Christian education

Three or more clearly articulated theological concepts Three or more clearly articulated historical ideas applied to contemporary Christian education Clear discussion of three or more philosophical approaches to education applied to contemporary Christian education Three or more sociological/ cultural issues applied to Christian education Three or more concepts regarding the philosophy and meaning of education

Philosophy answers basic philosophical questions +15%

Vague or inappropriate application

Philosophy address sociological concerns +15%

Vague or inappropriate application

One sociological/ cultural issue applied to Christian education

Two sociological/ cultural issues applied to Christian education

Philosophy clearly articulates the purpose and meaning of education in the Church

Vague or inappropriate application

One concept regarding the philosophy and meaning of education

Two concepts regarding the philosophy and meaning of education

+15% Philosophy addresses their personal preparation for educational leadership through Bible study and Church investment +10%

Vague or inappropriate application

Presents one example of engagement in church ministry and one example of personal growth through personal Bible study

Presents two examples of engagement in church ministry and two examples of personal growth through personal Bible study

Presents three or more examples of engagement in church ministry and three or more examples of personal growth through personal Bible study

SUGGESTED OTHER ASSESSMENT MECHANISMS

DELIVERY FORMAT A variety of teaching methods and components are acceptable. A combination of all face to face activities must equal 45 contact hours and a combination of all assignments must equal 75-90 hours of individual study and preparation. If taught as an online or hybrid delivery format, the total quantity of hours still applies.

REQUIRED RESOURCES Faculty may select texts and other resources for this course which will supplement the learning of students and help them to accomplish the course objectives.

RECOMMENDED RESOURCES Anthony, Michael J. 1992. Foundations of Ministry: An Introduction to Christian Education for a New Generation. Grand Rapids: Baker Books. ___________. 2001. Introducing Christian Education: Foundations for the 21st Century. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic. ___________ and Warren S. Benson. 2003. Exploring the History and Philosophy of Christian Education. Grand Rapids: Kregel. Astley, Jeff. 1994. The Philosophy of Christian Religious Education. Birmingham, AL: Religious Education Press. Berryman, Jerome. 1995. Godly Play: An Imaginative Approach to Religious Education. Minneapolis: Augsburg. Bruce, Barbara. 2007. Triangular Teaching: A New Way of Teaching the Bible to Adults. Nashville: Abingdon Press. Burgess, Harold William. 1996. Models of Religious Education: Theory and Practice in Historical and Contemporary Perspective. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books. Claerbaut, David. 2004. Faith and Learning on the Edge: A Bold New Look at Religion in Higher Education. Grand Rapids: Zondervan. Edge, Findley B. 1995. Teaching for Results, rev. ed. Nashville: Broadman & Holman.

Gardner, Howard. 1999. The Disciplined Mind: What all Students Should Understand. New York: Simon & Schuster. Knight, George R. 2006. Philosophy & Education: An Introduction in Christian Perspective, 4th ed. Berrien Springs, MI: Andrews University Press. LeFever, Marlene. 1985. Creative Teaching Methods. Marlene LeFever. Cook Publishing. ___________. 1995. Reaching Everyone God Gave you to Teach. Cook Publishing. McManus, Erwin Raphael. 2001. An Unstoppable Force: Daring to Become the Church God Had in Mind. Loveland, CO: Group Publishing. Pazmino, Robert W. 1997. Foundational Issues in Christian Education: An Introduction in Evangelical Perspective, 2d ed. Grand Rapids: Baker Book House. ___________. 2001. God Our Teacher: Theological Basics in Christian Education, Grand Rapids: Baker Academic. Peterson, Michael L. 2001. With All Your Mind: A Christian Philosophy of Education. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press. Poe, Harry Lee. 2004. Christianity in the Academy: Teaching at the Intersection of Faith and Learning. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic. Reed, James E. and Ronnie Prevost. 1993. History of Christian Education. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers. Webber, Robert. 1999. Ancient-Future Faith: Rethinking Evangelicalism for a Postmodern World. Grand Rapids: Baker Books. Yount, William R. 1999. Called to Teach: An Introduction to the Ministry of Teaching. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers. ___________, ed. 2008. The Teaching Ministry of the Church. Nashville: B&H Academic.