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OUR COW HERD HAS BEEN DECIMATED • MINIMIZE SHRINK • WESTERN PRICE INSURANCE CAN WORK www.canadiancattlemen.ca

August 2012 $3.00

Helping Commercial Cattlemen Achieve Value

www.cdnangus.ca

MARKETING A

WAGYU EATING

EXPERIENCE

Jeff and Michelle Ball, Brant, Alta.

Publications Mail Agreement Number 40069240

Look for your copy of the STOCK BUYER’S GUIDE inside this issue. Sponsored by:

Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed Sales for Angus Tagged Cattle cmyk (coated)

BRITISH COLUMBIA

logos have white release built into artwork.

BC Livestock Producers Co-op Assoc. Kamloops 250-573-3939 October 16 Okanagan Falls 250-497-5416 October 15 Vanderhoof 250-567-4333 logos have white release built into artwork. October 19 Williams Lake 250-398-7174 ALL October 17 & 18 TAGGED SALE Valley Auction Ltd. (Armstrong) 250-546-9420 October 27; November 10 Vold Jones & Vold (Dawson Creek) 250-782-3766 September 17; October 22

ALBERTA

Balog Auction Services Inc. (Lethbridge) 403-320-1980 October 23 & 30; November 6 Bow Slope Shipping Association (Brooks) 403-362-5521 October 22, 23 & 29; November 5 Burnt Lake Livestock Mart (Red Deer) 403-347-6100 October 4 & 25; November 1 Calgary Stockyards—Strathmore 403-934-3344 Oct 13; Nov 10; Dec 1 Dryland Cattle Trading Co. (Veteran) 403-575-3772 November 5 Grande Prairie Livestock Market 780-532-3949 October 10; November 14 Innisfail Auction Market Ltd. 403-227-3166 October 3 & 15; November 5 & 19; December 3 Medicine Hat Feeding Company Ltd. 403-526-3129 Oct 15, 19, 22, 26 & 31; Nov 2 & 9

2012 & 2013

Nilsson Bros. Inc. SASKATCHEWAN Clyde Assiniboia Livestock Auction 780-348-5893 306-642-5358 Sept 11; Oct 9; Nov 13 Oct 13 & 20; Nov 3, 10 & 17 Vermilion Cowtown Livestock Exchange Inc. 780-853-5372 (Maple Creek) October 20; November 3 306-662-2648 Olds Auction Mart Oct 16, 18, 20, 25, 27 & 30; 403-556-3655 November 1 October 5 & 26 Heartland Livestock Services Perlich Bros Auction Market Ltd. Lloydminster (Lethbridge) 306-825-8831 403-329-3101 October 17; November 5 & 28 Oct 3, 17, 20 & 27; Nov 3 Moose Jaw Provost Livestock Exchange 306-692-2385 780-753-2369 October 23; November 6 & 20 October 29; November 12 Prince Albert Rimbey Auction Mart 306-763-8463 403-843-2439 Oct 2; Nov 6; Dec 4 October 23 & November 23 Swift Current Sekura Auctions (Drayton Valley) 306-773-3174 780-542-4337 Oct 13 & 20; Nov 3, 8, 10, 17 & 24 September 20; October 11 & 25; Yorkton November 8 & 22; December 6 306-783-9437 ALL Southern Alberta Livestock Exchange October 3 & 31; TAGGED SALE Fort Macleod Livestock Auction November 7 403-553-3315 Mankota Stockmen’s Weigh Co. Ltd. October 18 & 20 306-478-2229 ALL Highwood Livestock Auction TAGGED SALE Oct 19 & 26; Nov 2 (High River) Meadow Lake Stockyards Ltd. 403-652-3343 306-236-3411 October 26; November 2 Oct 11 & 25; Nov 8 & 22 Stettler Auction Mart (1990) Ltd. Parkland Livestock Market (Kelliher) 403-742-2368 306-675-2077 October 12 ~; November 2 ~ Nov 1, 15 & 29; Dec 6 TEAM Electronic Auction Market Saskatoon Livestock Sales 403-234-7429 306-382-8088 October 12; November 9 & 30 November 5 & 19; December 3 Triple J Livestock (Westlock) Shaunavon Livestock Sales (88) Ltd. 780-349-3153 306-297-2457 ALL October 22 TAGGED SALE October 15 & 26 Viking Auction Market Spiritwood Stockyards 780-336-2209 306-883-2168 Oct 9; Nov 6; Dec 4 Oct 10 & 24; Nov 7 & 21 Vold Jones & Vold Weyburn Livestock Exchange Foothills Livestock Auction 306-842-4574 (Stavely) Oct 15 & 29; Nov 12 & 26 403-549-2120 Whitewood Livestock October 15; November 5 306-735-2822 Ponoka October 16 & 30; November 13 403-783-5561 September 27

MANITOBA

ONTARIO

QUEBEC

Gladstone Auction Mart Brussels Livestock Encan Sawyerville Inc. 204-385-2537 519-887-6461 (Cookshire) October 23; March 5 November 12 v & 30 819-875-3577 Grunthal Livestock Auction Mart Ltd. David Carson Farms & Auction October 25; February 7 204-434-6519 Services Ltd. (Listowel) Réseau Encans Québec October 16; November 13 519-291-2049 (Saint-Isidore) Heartland Livestock Services October 22 418-882-6341 Brandon Kawartha Lakes Cooperative Auction October 26; February 8 204-727-1431 Market Inc. (Woodville) Veilleux & Fréres Inc. (NEW SALE!) ALL October 16; October 25-; TAGGED SALE 705-439-4444 418-459-3343 November 6 October 17 October 24 Virden Keady Livestock Market (Tara) 204-748-2809 519-934-2339 NEW BRUNSWICK ALL October 10 & 17; November 7 & 21 October 25 TAGGED SALE Sussex and Studholm Agric. Soc. Interlake Cattlemens Co-op Maple Hill Auctions (Hanover) Auction Barn (NEW SALE!) Association Ltd. (Ashern) 519-506-1400 506-432-5714 204-768-2360 October 22 September 12 October 24 Ontario Livestock Exchange (Waterloo) Killarney Auction Mart Ltd. NOVA SCOTIA 519-884-2082 204-523-8477 October 22 & November 19 September 19; October 17; November 21 Atlantic Stockyards Limited (Truro) Ontario Stockyards Inc. (Cookstown) Ste. Rose Auction Mart Ltd. 902-893-9603 705-458-4000 204-447-2266 November 10 October 18 October 25 Ottawa Livestock Exchange (Greely) Strathclair Auction Mart Ltd. 613-821-2634 204-365-5327 November 1 October 22 & November 5 Taylor Auction Service (Melita) Market your 2012 Angus tagged calves at these 173 Angus feature 204-877-3834 sales at 67 participating auction markets. These auctions are October 18; November 29 recognized supporters and sellers of cattle identified as Angus Winnipeg Livestock Sales Ltd. through the Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed Tag. * Dates are subject to change. Call auction markets for more information. 204-694-8328 October 5 & 15; November 2 - all natural sale • ~ scanned, age verified traceable • v vaccinated

CONTACTS

Director of Field Services:

Brian Good 403-391-4037 Auction MArt of the YeAr presented to VJV Auction co. Ltd. of ponokA, AB, And uMBreLLA MArts foothiLLs LiVestock Auction of stAVeLY, AB And dAwson creek Auction of dAwson creek, Bc.

Fieldmen:

Ken Cox, Western Canada 780-672-6860 Laird Senft, Saskatchewan 306-332-4823 Jack Brown, British Columbia 604-888-0862 Blair McRae, Manitoba 204-728-3058 Wayne Gallup, Quebec/Maritimes 819-826-3026

Canadian Angus Association 142, 6715 – 8 Street NE Calgary, AB T2E 7H7 Phone: 1-888-571-3580 www.cdnangus.ca email: [email protected]

August 2012

Volume 75, No. 8

Established 1938 ISSN 1196-8923 Cattlemen Editorial: Editor: Gren Winslow 1666 Dublin Avenue, Winnipeg, MB R3H 0H1 (204) 944-5753 Fax (204) 944-5416 Email: [email protected] Field Editor: Debbie Furber Box 1168, Tisdale, SK S0E 1T0 (306) 873-4360 Fax (306) 873-4360 Email: [email protected]

FEATURES Cattle price insurance can work in western canada. .................................................... 10 We could see $2.50 this fall............................................ 12 Marketing a wagyu eating experience........................... 16 It is all in the handshake............................................... 20

Advertising Sales: Deborah Wilson Box 19, Site 3, RR 1, High River, AB T1V 1N1 (403) 325-1695 Fax (204) 944-5562 Email: [email protected] Head Office: 1666 Dublin Avenue, Winnipeg, MB R3H 0H1 (204) 944-5765 Fax (204) 944-5562 Advertising Services Co-ordinator: Arlene Bomback (204) 944-5765 Fax (204) 944-5562 Email: [email protected] Publisher: Bob Willcox Email: [email protected]

Our cow herd has been decimated................................. 24

Associate Publisher/Editorial Director: John Morriss Email: [email protected]

Minimize shrink............................................................... 28

Production Director: Shawna Gibson Email: [email protected]

Ken hurlburt joins the lmac hall of fame. .................. 32 Gattey wins lmac auctioneering championship............ 34 Verified beef production................................................ 35 Departments

16

COMMENT............................................... 6 NEWSMAKERS......................................... 8 LETTERS.................................................. 8 NUTRITION............................................ 22 VET ADVICE.......................................... 26 HOLISTIC RANCHING.............................. 27 RESEARCH............................................ 36 CCA REPORTS...................................... 38 PRIME CUTS......................................... 40 STRAIGHT FROM THE HIP...................... 41 NEWS ROUNDUP................................... 42 PURELY PUREBRED............................... 46 THE MARKETS...................................... 49 MARKET TALK....................................... 51 SALES & EVENTS.................................. 52

“Congratulations to our August sur vey winner, Orrin Hart, Claresholm, Alta. This month’s sur vey is on page 33.”

Director of Sales and Circulation: Lynda Tityk Email: [email protected] Circulation Manager: Heather Anderson Email: [email protected] Contents  of  C attlemen   are  copyrighted  and  may  be reproduced only when written permission is obtained from the editor and proper credit is given to Cattlemen. Cattlemen and Canadian Cattlemen are Trade Marks of Farm Business Communications. Cattlemen is published monthly (with the exception of July and 2 issues in Februar y and October) by Farm Business Communications.  Head  of fice:  Winnipeg,  Manitoba. Printed  by  Transcontinental  LGMC.  Cattlemen is printed with linseed oil-based inks. Subscription rates in Canada — $34.65 for one year, $51.45 for 2 years (prices include GST). Manitoba residents add 7% PST. U.S. subscription rate — $35 (U.S. funds). Subscription rate outside Canada and U.S. — $55 per year. Single copies $3. We acknowledge the financial support of the Govern­ment of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Publications Mail Agreement Number 40069240. Canadian  Postmaster:  Return  undeliverable  Canadian addresses (covers only) to: Circulation Dept., PO Box 9800, Winnipeg, MB R3C 3K7. U.S. Postmaster: Send address changes and undeliverable addresses (covers only) to: Circulation Dept., PO Box 9800, Winnipeg, MB R3C 3K7.

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or email: [email protected] U.S. subscribers call 1-204-944-5766

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Our cover photo by Debbie Furber.

www.canadiancattlemen.ca Our commitment to your privacy

At Farm Business Communications we have a firm commitment to protecting your privacy and security as our customer. Farm Business Communications will only collect personal information if it is required for the proper functioning of our business. As part of our commitment to enhance customer service, we may share this personal information with other strategic business partners. For more information regarding our Customer Information Privacy Policy, write to: Information Protection Officer, Farm Business Communications, 1666 Dublin Avenue, Winnipeg, MB R3H 0H1. Occasionally we make our list of subscribers available to other reputable firms whose products and services might be of interest to you. If you would prefer not to receive such offers, please contact us at the address in the preceding paragraph, or call 1-800-665-1362.

4 Cattlemen / august 2012

The  editors  and  journalists  who  write,  contribute  and  provide  opinions to  Canadian  Cattlemen  and  Farm  Business  Communications  attempt  to provide accurate and useful opinions, information and analysis. However, the  editors,  journalists,  C anadian   C attlemen   and  Farm  Business Communications,  cannot  and  do  not  guarantee  the  accuracy  of  the information  contained  in  this  publication  and  the  editors  as  well  as C anadian   C attlemen   and  Farm  Business  Communications  assume  no responsibility  for  any  actions  or  decisions  taken  by  any  reader  for  this publication based on any and all information provided.

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1

WORKDAYS TO GETAWAYS

c o m m e n t

by Gren Winslow

A tough start The Canada Beef boys deserve some sympathy

Y

ou have to have some sympathy for the offshore marketing crew at Canada Beef Inc. these days. It’s their first full year as the producers’ market promotion agency in overseas markets and it has to be said that it’s been tough sledding so far. If you read only the headlines in the mainstream media you could mistakenly think things are booming along. In the past couple of months alone we’ve had plenty of good news that raises our hopes about expanded market access for Canadian beef. • The WTO reaffirmed Canada’s key claim that U.S. country-of-origin labelling unfairly discriminates against imported livestock. Of course, the U.S. will take its time figuring out a response to the panel ruling but it is to be hoped it will eventually strip away some of the red tape that has caused many U.S. packers and feedlots to turn away from Canadian cattle. • Canada is accepted at the table of the TransPacific Partnership (TPP) free trade talks. • Japan once again hints it will relax the 20-month import restriction on U.S. (and presumably Canadian) beef as a bargaining chip to gain a seat at the TPP free trade talks. • Canada formally withdraws its request for a WTO dispute settlement panel with South Korea after Korea holds to its earlier agreement to reopen its market to Canadian beef under 30 months of age. • Peru reopens to Canadian bone-in beef under 30 months and boneless beef of all ages, and Kazakhstan for under-30-month boneless. The January to April exports numbers reported by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada don’t paint quite so rosy a picture. Sales of beef and veal to Mexico were down 3.6 per cent at 7,644 tonnes, although offal sales were up 63 per cent. Beef sales to Japan at 1,506 tonnes, down 3.9 per cent; offal sales are down 35 per cent. Hong Kong and Macau down 8.8 per cent on the beef but offal sales shot up 534 per cent. Southeast Asia, down 60 per cent; Central and South America, 26 per cent less beef and veal, but 1,322 per cent more offal. Russia, beef and veal down 46 per cent, offal down as well. Middle East and North Africa, sales are flat. All the smaller countries are down in total by 46 per cent on the beef and veal trade from last year. European beef sales are also down 8.4 per cent. What was more surprising is that with all the yam-

6 Cattlemen / August 2012

mering over trade with Europe we have only sold 120 tonnes into this giant marketplace in the first four months of the year. By comparison the Caribbean countries bought 265 tonnes over the same four months, 44 per cent more than last year. China may have agreed to buy Canadian beef in February but by April only 82 tonnes had moved. Still that is 82 tonnes more than in 2011. South Korea has bought 229 tonnes, a little more than we shipped to Central and South America over the same period. It’s a start, but pales in comparison to the 51,128 tonnes the U.S. sold into S. Korea from January through May. Oh to have tariff-free access like the Americans! To be fair we need to point out that our total four-month exports of 96,434 tonnes of beef or 108,142 tonnes with the offal were up 4.0 per cent. Much of that can be attributed to a 3.1 per cent increase in our beef exports to the U.S. Our southern neighbours took 78,480 tonnes or 81 per cent of our beef and veal in those months. If the goal at Canada Beef is to offset some of our reliance on the U.S. market this gives you some idea of the scope of the chore in front of them. It doesn’t help that this has also been a tough year for beef exports. U.S. export shipments were also down 11 per cent from January to May. Their big four customers, in order, were all down: Canada (-8.0 per cent), Mexico (-13 per cent), South Korea (-24 per cent), Japan (-3.0 per cent). Some of the pain was no doubt offset by the rising value of these loads. While U.S. packers shipped 11 per cent less tonnage up to May, they brought in 4.0 per cent more dollars, $1.9 billion to be precise. It may be that the Canadian shipments enjoyed the same inflation but I don’t have access to those numbers. None of this is meant as a criticism of the Canada Beef International export team. They’ve barely had time to put their team in place. And there are many factors at play in these markets that they really have no control over. For one thing, our shrinking herd size may make it hard for our mainline packers to take on overseas commitments of any scale. If the U.S. feedlots keep buying up our feeder cattle at the same rate as they have to this point supplies will be a real concern for some time yet. As I was saying, you have to have sympathy for the fellows at Canada Beef. Their best days are still in front of them. www.canadiancattlemen.ca

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NEWSMAKERS David HaywoodFarmer of Savona was elected president of the British Columbia Cattlemen’s Association at its summer annual meeting. Joining him on the executive are David HaywoodFarmer vice-president Lary Fossum of Dawson Creek, past president Judy Guichon along with Martin Rossmann, Linda Allison, Larry Garrett and John Kochel. Chris Nykoluk who recently retired as range management specialist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s community pasture program has received Chris Nykoluk the Industry Innovation Award from the Saskatchewan Forage Council. A contribution was made in her name to the Alicia Hargrave Memorial Bursary, College of Agriculture and Bioresources at the University of Saskatchewan. The Ontario industry is remembering Wyoming, Ont., cattle feeder Tony Noorloos who passed away last month. He was a past president of the Ontario Cattlemen’s Association and a board member of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association in the 1980s.

LETTERS Prices are not high

It’s time the agriculture industry, especially those people directly involved with the cattle industry, stop referring to current cattle feeder prices as “high.” The reality is that feeder prices are NOT high. They are just barely where they should be. Right now cattle prices are normal or adequate and the industry needs to recognize that fact immediately. Constantly referring to feeder prices as high gives the false impression that if prices drop, everyone will still be fine because they are getting “normal” value for their cattle. If prices fall people will call it a market correction, shrug their shoul-

8 CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012

A retired Ontario veterinarian Dr. Jim Fairles of Mount Forest, Ont. has been named president of the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association, replacing Dr. Lloyd Keddie, of Fairview, Alta., Jeffery Bilow is the new chief operating offi cer of Alberta’s Livestock Identification Services Ltd. (LIS), the province’s industry-run brand inspection agency. He was previously the manager of market strategy — livestock at UFA and worked for JBS Five Rivers Cattle Feeding LLC in the U.S. He started his new job last month. Jim Abel of Stettler, Alta., was reelected as president of the Livestock Markets Association of Canada at its summer convention in Calgary. Ken Perlich of Lethbridge is first vice-president and Scott Campbell, Winnipeg second VP. The remaining directors are Tom Vicars, B.C.; Bob Perlich, Alta.; Stewart Stone and Rhett Parks, Sask.; Rick Wright, Man.; and Larry Witzel and Steve Spratt, Ont. Lori Loree resigned as communications manager of the Alberta Beef Producers at the end of July to take up a new career as a commercial photographer and spend more time on her family’s crop-dusting company. The Federation des producteurs de bovins du Quebec closed the Levinoff-Colbex cow plant at the end of ders and turn away. Reality is input prices remain up and if cattle prices fall a lot of people are going to be in trouble. Everyone knows this and it weighs on the minds of producers but not many people speak up. Feeder prices are finally at the point where ranchers can maybe make a little money. Perhaps they can afford to finally replace the brakes on the old truck; maybe pay down their loans or put a couple dollars away for retirement. Maybe, just maybe, they can start to dream about expanding their operations so one day their children can have a place of their own. When ranchers are driving nice trucks and have a smile on their face, then prices can be considered to be “high.” TRAVIS AND KARA EKLUND WINEGLASS RANCH, COCHRANE, ALTA.

May but producers must still pay a $53.86-per-head levy on cull cows to cover the $32 million borrowed to upgrade the plant in 2008. The federation has the plant up for sale but tenders were still open at press time. Gary Latimer was affirmed in June as president of the Canadian Angus Association for 2012-13. He and his wife Jacci with their son Richard and his wife Kelly own Gar y Latimer and operate Remitall Farms at Olds. Kevin Blair of Lanigan, Sask., is president-elect for next year. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada approved $765,000 last month to create the Canadian Agri-Traceability Services (CATS). This new independent agency will combine the databases of the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA) and Agri-Traçabilité Québec (ATQ) under one independent agency. For more information see our May 2012 story on CATS or visit www. agr.gc.ca/cifsi. Suzanne Vinet will take over as deputy minister of agriculture for the federal government in September, replacing John Knubley. Vinet is currently serving as president of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec. She has a degree in economics from Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ont., a diploma from the Institut de Technologie agricole et alimentaire in St-Hyacinthe, Que. and attended the National Defence College of Canada in Kingston. Manitoba Beef Producers (MBP) has presented $500 bursaries to four children of active Manitoba beef producers to continue their studies. They are Jared Buckley, Oak Lake; Melanie Eastman, Hartney; Keith Johnson, Komarno and Michel Rey, St. Claude. Curtis Kuchink of Regina and Ross Macdonald from Lake Alma have been elected to the executive of the Canadian Western Agribition where they will join president, Bryan Hadland, Reed Andrew and Stewart Stone of Regina, and Marilyn Charlton of Weyburn. C www.canadiancattlemen.ca

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FINANCE

CATTLE PRICE INSURANCE CAN WORK IN WESTERN CANADA The building blocks are in place if the politicians are willing

W

ith an eye to a level playing field for beef producers, the topic of cattle price insurance similar to that offered in Alberta continues to resurface during producer meetings in the other Prairie provinces. Iebeling Kaastra, research director with Gibson Capital of Calgary, presented the company’s analysis of the feasibility of a livestock price insurance program (LPIP) for Western Canada during the Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association convention this spring. Kaastra has been intimately involved with the Alberta government and industry in developing the four price insurance products now delivered by Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (AFSC) in Alberta — the fed program launched in September, 2009, the feeder program in November, 2010, followed by calf and market hog programs in 2011. The recent study was undertaken on behalf of the federal government and four western provinces. The crux of developing fed, feeder and calf price insurance products for Western Canada would be creating regional settlement price indices for each product because the accuracy would be dependent on trade volume and a system to collect detailed weekly market prices. “Creating the settlement price indices takes a lot of work and it’s critical that producers have faith in them,” Kaastra says. They have to be regional, visible and readily available to producers, not only for insurance purposes, but as a source of information for other marketing decisions, such as forward contracts, and leveraging credit from lenders. “Overall, there appears to be enough market volume in Saskatchewan and Manitoba to create indices for calves and feeder cattle to make it a feasible proposition,” Kaastra says, although the company’s analysis suggests the industry would be better served by creating market clusters rather than establishing regions based on provincial boundaries. To illustrate this concept, Kaastra draws one circle on the map to encompass the area north of Calgary spanning the border to include Saskatoon and the area north of it in Saskatchewan. A second circle takes in the southern areas of each province, and a third surrounds east-central and southeastern Saskatchewan along with Manitoba. The number and size of the regions would depend on the number of auction markets supplying weekly price reports and total market volume available for creating a settlement price index. The price indices and premiums that change from week to week are based on actual market prices. The price sources for the Alberta program are a weekly Canfax survey of Alberta producers for fat cattle and nearly all of the Alberta auction markets for feeders and calves. The confidential reports are now automatically generated from the MarketMaster software program to show sale results lot by lot and the average for each weight band. 10 CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012

Map illustrating regional concept Gibson Capital’s analysis recommends establishing up to three additional regional indices (price insurance products) for calf price insurance and another three for feeder price insurance. B.C. producers would be best served by the Alberta products. The company suggests offering one western-wide product for fed cattle based on the Alberta fed-cattle price index because the volume of fed cattle in other provinces isn’t sufficient to establish additional price indices at this time. It may be possible to collect market information from feedlots in other provinces to incorporate into the single index.

How price insurance works Kaastra emphasizes that the LPIP products differ significantly from traditional crop insurance and income stabilization programs and hedging on the U.S. futures market. The futures market wasn’t working for most operations because of the complexity of factoring in the exchange rate on the dollar and the basis, which can be relatively stable for fed cattle, but all over the board on feeder cattle and calves, he explains. It can be an effective risk management tool if the operation has a dedicated person to do the hedging and the markets are normal, but quickly falls apart when the border closes. Each of the LPIP settlement price indices are based on a regional price that covers the Canadian dollar and basis. The most the producer pays is one premium at the time of taking out the contract. Producers pay the full premium calculated in dollars per hundredweight tied to a market price for the expected sale weight of the cattle and coverage period of their choice. The market-based premium structure was preferred by the producer groups involved in designing the program because it is trade neutral. Continued on page 11 www.canadiancattlemen.ca

CPIP calf premiums for May 24, 2012

Continued from page 10

The payout is the difference between the selected coverage level and settlement price index. If the settlement price index is higher than the selected coverage during the week the cattle are sold, the contract expires automatically without a payout. Producers have a four-week window leading up to the closing date in which to file a claim and don’t have to sell the cattle to collect on their insurance contract. This gives them the ability to use the insurance program as a risk management tool to set a floor price and still take advantage of an upswing in cattle prices. Kaastra says the design of the program offers producers a lot of flexibility as far as deciding on when and what classes of cattle to insure, and situations wherein having insurance would be most valuable as a risk management tool. The payout comes very quickly, rather than at the end of the year as is the case with an annual insurance-style program, which would require making all of these decisions on a yearby-year basis. LPIP is proving to be very market responsive in that the ebb and flow of producer uptake follows actual market conditions throughout the year. AFSC is considering the possibility of offering the option to roll up to a higher coverage level during the period of a contract. A second enhancement under review is the possibility of increasing the maximum coverage level from the current 95 per cent to 100 per cent because uptake to date has been heavily weighted to the highest coverage levels. Where to from here? “It will be up to each provincial government to decide whether livestock price insurance is a worthwhile product to make available to its producers,” Kaastra comments. The government-industry working group idea worked well to get the program up and running in Alberta, he adds. It included representatives from Alberta Agriculture, AFSC, Gibson Capital, auction markets, and producer associations. “It’s critical to have the auction markets on board and you definitely want to have producer input because they will be the customers — you want to make sure the industry believes in the product,” Kaastra says. He feels this is a unique opportunity for the western provinces to design a program with interprovincial scope that retains enough flexibility to allow for differences in premiums, price levels and delivery mechanisms across regions. A significant benefit to taking a common approach would be the cost and time savings compared to each province trying to develop its own program from scratch. Kaastra says AFSC appears to have the technology and infrastructure in place to offer cost-effective service to other provinces and is doing a great job promoting and administering the LPIP. In fact, the fed-cattle price insurance product received the premier’s Silver Award of Excellence in the fall of 2011, a mere two years after its launch. Bill Hoar, LPIP co-ordinator with AFSC, confirms that the program is at a point where the corporation would be able to take the products to other provinces. He says the new calf price insurance product has been well received by Alberta producers. As of early July, 32,000 head have been insured, with uptake jumping from 40 contracts the first year, to 200 contracts this year. The feeder program has received good support, too, with contracts up exponentially compared to last year. www.canadiancattlemen.ca

Premium ($/cwt) Index ($/ cwt)

16 weeks 17-Sep-12

160

1.92

158

20 weeks 15-Oct-12

24 weeks 12-Nov-12

28 weeks 10-Dec-12

1.55

2.18

1.99

156

1.25

1.74

1.56

154

1.01

1.39

1.22

2.21

152

0.82

1.09

0.92

1.69

150

0.66

0.84

0.69

1.31

148

0.50

0.65

0.54

0.99

146

0.41

0.49

0.38

0.73

144

0.33

0.37

0.27

0.53

142

0.26

0.27

0.19

0.37

140

0.21

0.20

0.26

138

0.15

0.16

0.17

136

0.12

0.12

Table B-1 Key features of CPIP and HPIP CPIP-fed CPIP-feeder launched launched Nov. Sept. 2009 2010 Cycle

Coverage offered

Settlement Settlement index based on Settlement index data source

CPIP-calf launched March 2011

HPIP launched July 2011

Seasonal (spring Year round calving/fall marketing) Policies sold 12 to 36 12 to 36 Feb. to May, 2 to 10 months weeks weeks for settlement Sept. to Dec. Coverage starts at 95% of estimated forward price Settlement based Settlement based on weekly average on monthly average price, four-week claim window price 750 to 950 lb. 550 Fed steers steers WHE index 100 to 650 lb. & heifers (scaled to price steers 850 lbs.) Formula (based Canfax 22 Alberta 22 Alberta on USDA HG_206 producer auction auction report and survey markets markets WHE factor) Year round

Year round (policies not sold to settle in June or July)

Key features of each product in a nutshell. The fed program has insured 209,000 head and paid out more than $2 million. “There really is nowhere to go but up with these programs,” Hoar comments, adding that producer-driven, producer-funded programs like cattle price insurance may be a peek into the future of farm programs considering how the landscape continues to change. AFSC has added field analysts, who attend meetings and auction markets to explain the program to producers. The premium tables, which change daily, are now circulated directly to producers by email, fax or to a mobile device with a link to log on to his or her account to purchase insurance. Alberta’s producer associations also promote the program, he says. By virtue of its availability alone, LPIP creates another option for risk management, regardless of the number of producers who take out contracts. For more detail visit www.afsc.ca. C — Debbie Furber Cattlemen / August 2012 11

MARKETING

WE COULD SEE $2.50 THIS FALL It wouldn’t surprise Andy Drake of CattleX who tells his clients to track grain prices to see what feedlots will pay

W

hatever is the opposite of the perfect storm for cow-calf producers, Andy Drake of CattleX at Hamiota, Man., predicts that’s what is in store for the next few years. “I think we will see times like we haven’t seen before. Four-weight calves sold for around $2 to $2.10 a pound last fall. It won’t be out of reach to see $2.30 to $2.50 this fall,” Drake says. His promising outlook is backed by cattle supply and feed grain market conditions that could converge to favour lofty calf prices for at least three more years and perhaps longer depending on how quickly U.S. producers rebuild their cow herds. Even if they start ramping up in a big way this year, it will be 2015 before the calves from those retained heifers influence the meat supply. “The price of calves and feed are the major expenses for feedlots. With the tight cattle supply and potential for heifer calves to go back into breeding herds instead of into feedlots in the U.S. and Canada, I can’t see cattle prices dropping,” Drake says. “Watch corn and barley prices. They will make more difference to the price feedlots are willing to pay for calves this fall than the futures board for fat cattle. The cattle will flow to the areas with the lowest cost of gain.” This isn’t to say there won’t still be challenges, he adds. The increase cow-calf producers see for their calves will go toward defraying rising land, operating and labour costs, but the darkest cloud Drake sees on the horizon is the public animal welfare movement and the industry’s ability to meet those demands in ways that don’t compromise the health of animals and efficient production. “The public needs to learn and understand that producers do care about the health of their cattle. Healthier cattle are more content and more profitable,” he says, likening the emerging animal welfare issue to environmental concerns, which have become more understood and manageable since coming to the forefront in the 1990s.

12 CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012

Andy (l) and Ken Drake expect to see lofty calf prices for three more years. Contracting cattle is another trend that will continue to grow over time. The drive to try to have cattle committed in one way or another along the line will be underpinned by the cost of cattle and concerns about food safety. Considering the cost of animals, fewer and fewer people are financially able to deal in large volumes of cattle, Drake explains. Also, packers or feedlots will increasingly want control on assurances of the pharmaceuticals used all along the line. The push will come from the packers, who will push the feedlots, who will push the grassers and cow-calf people in order to guarantee every step is integrated as much as possible and that vaccines and treatments are administered properly in a timely fashion to the best of everyone’s ability to ensure the health of the cattle.

CattleX Drake’s understanding of the beef industry and cattle markets is rooted in his family history in farming and the cattle marketing business. His father, Ken Drake, remains a partner in CattleX, which started off as a feedlot, built in 1976. In 1988, Doug Jackson and N&M Livestock reinvented the business as a buying station, which was named CattleX when Ken joined

them in 1990. The Drakes also run their own cow-calf operation. CattleX provides order-buying services with agents attending all auction markets in Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan and buying directly from farms. Producers who sell off the farm are welcome to drop by the facility to watch the cattle get weighed and pick up the cheque right then and there. The price they receive is based on a pre-negotiated price per pound, slide and shrink. CattleX doesn’t charge commission to sellers. Cattle that the company purchase on behalf of buyers come into the station where they are weighed, sorted and rested with feed and water in clean pens. Within a day, they are reloaded for shipment directly to the buyer’s facility of choice. CattleX’s processing facility can handle 600 to 700 head a day. It was designed with the flow and safety of cattle and people in mind by animal behaviour specialist, Dr. Temple Grandin of Colorado State University, and incorporates some of the best ideas the Drakes had seen at customers’ feedlots. Another major component of CattleX’s business is providing management services for customers in Alberta www.canadiancattlemen.ca

and the U.S. who put calves on grass or in backgrounding lots in Manitoba and Saskatchewan in order to maintain a steady flow of cattle into their home finishing lots. CattleX will source, weigh and deliver the calves to the backgrounding lot or pasture, negotiate the contract with the custom operator, and make periodic visits to ensure performance and care of the cattle is as expected. When it’s time for the calves to move to the home lot, CattleX oversees the weighing, organizes the trucking and looks after the export and shipping details to get them to the end destination.

Sell well As far as what buyers will be look1106844says proper ingJob for# this fall, Drake client: is huge. It’s Novartis castration extremely importantSpecs: for Manitoba T:producers 7x5 // 4C because bovine tuberculosis (TB) regulations require all bull calves as well as heifers 1. Desktop:JhW 3. aD: over 12 months of age from Manitoba 2. Proof: 4. cD: to be TB tested before leaving the province. It’s a three-day test and reactors

have to be retested adding on another three-day wait, which takes buyers and competition right out of the picture. Cattle from other provinces are kept segregated while at the CattleX facility and don’t have to be TB tested, however, bulls going into feedlots in Canada are meeting more price resistance as well. Horns are more of an issue with yearling cattle coming off grass than with young animals going directly into a feedlot because the calves will be fed out before the horns are large enough to become a problem. Feedlots in Eastern Canada and south of the border are behind most of the demand for preconditioned calves and have certainly driven the backgrounding industry in Manitoba, aD #:nvcSB06126844 Drake says. In his experience, preconditioned calves — those that have been weaned, vaccinated and started on feed — fare better health-wise than calves fresh off 5. cW: the cows, especially when they have to 6. Prod. Mgr: be transported long distances. “Feedlots track cattle by the lot, so

if they like the way the cattle perform they will specifically ask for ‘that kind of cattle’ the next year and we can trace the calves back to where they came from. If cow-calf producers perform the preconditioning and do it properly, they will start to see benefits the second year,” he explains. Some of CattleX’s major feedlot customers in Canada and the U.S. are currently in the process of developing systems tied to electronic identification tags so that they will be able to offer real-world health and performance data on individual animals to cowcalf producers. This will give cow-calf producers direction in making genetic and management improvements at the ground level. For all of the challenges and fastpaced technological changes of the past decade, the one aspect of the beef industry that Drake most appreciates remains constant. That’s the trust and relationships 7. aS: that allow millions of dollars worth of cattle to be bought and sold sight-unseen on any given day. C — Debbie Furber

A DVERTOR I AL

ScourS Prevention StartS With the coW Ensuring next year’s calves get off to a fast, healthy start begins long before calving season through careful management and vaccination of the dam.

Vaccinating pregnant cows with SCOUR BOS® 9 has the added benefit of reducing the number of disease-causing pathogens shed in manure, thus reducing the calf’s chances of exposure.

Calf scours, or neonatal diarrhea, continues to be a leading cause of mortality and sickness among calves. Viruses and bacteria that can cause calf scours are naturally present in every calf’s environment. So how do you ensure that your calves are equipped to deal with this challenge?

Of course, vaccination and good colostrum management are only part of an effective scours prevention strategy. To ensure the health of your calves it is essential to incorporate other management strategies, including:

The most vital factor in the control of calfhood diseases, particularly scours, is colostrum. Newborn calves depend on colostrum for immunity against diseases until they are old enough to generate their own protective immunity. Vaccinating your pregnant cows and heifers against the common scours pathogens with SCOUR BOS® 9 will increase the protection against scours through their colostrum. Two things need to happen in order for this method to be effective. First, the cow must have optimum antibody concentrations present in her blood before she starts to make colostrum. Since cows begin to make colostrum 4 to 6 weeks before calving1 vaccination should occur ahead of this, following label directions. Second, the calf needs to receive 4 – 6 liters of colostrum within the first 24 hours of its life. If you’re not sure whether a calf has received enough colostrum, provide additional colostrum from the calf’s mother or a high-quality supplement.

• Reducing manure contamination in the calving area by moving cows away from the calving area when possible. • Providing adequate shelter for your cow-calf pairs in the calving and nursery areas. • Keeping calving and nursery areas well-bedded and well-drained. • Refraining from bringing in new animals to your herd during mid-to-late pregnancy and calving to reduce the spread of disease. • Isolating scouring calves in a separate area, away from the herd. Calf scours is a complex and multi-factorial disease, but with the right tools and timing you can reduce the risk it poses to next year’s calf crop. Plan ahead and talk to your herd veterinarian about making SCOUR BOS® 9 a part of your fall management to provide the best preventative strategies for your herd.

Scour BoS

EARLIER

BETTER

LONgER

1 Radostits O, gay C, Hinchcliff K, Constable P (editors). Veterinary Medicine, 10th ed., 2007. Scour Bos is registered trademark of Novartis Ag; used under license.

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

Cattlemen / August 2012 13

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12-07-20 8:49 AM

MARKETING

Brandon Ball and his parents Jeff and Michelle currently run 270 head of pure and percentage Wagyu.

MARKETING A WAGYU EATING EXPERIENCE

J

The Balls introduce Brant Lake Wagyu beef

eff and Michelle Ball and their son Brandon launched their new Brant Lake Wagyu beef brand in April, fulfilling a family vision that has been in the works since Jeff’s dad Jack brought the first load of Wagyu genetics to their Brant, Alta., farm in 1993. At the time the Wagyu breed that originated in Japan was a hot item in the seedstock trade but the commercial appeal of the Wagyu highly marbled beef was slower to develop. So when BSE hit people started culling their aging Wagyu stock at a rate that nearly wiped out the breed in Canada, except for a few stalwarts. The Balls continued to use Wagyu genetics and bulls from the U.S. in their crossbreeding program, adding about 20 replacement heifers each year to breed up the purebred and percentage herd that currently runs about 270 head, backed up by a substantial database of performance and carcass merit for calves fed out in Ballco Feeders’ feedlot. “It has always been our goal to get into a branded beef product because we have never found a similar beefeating experience ourselves. We kept

16 CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012

dabbling into it to a small degree selling Wagyu beef to family, friends and staff and they always commented on how different Wagyu beef tastes,” says Michelle, who handles the beef-marketing end of the business. The difference in the taste of Wagyu beef is due to the abundance of fine marbling fat throughout the muscle. It absorbs into the meat during cooking to create very tender beef with a distinct rich, buttery flavour. Readers may be familiar with Kobe beef, a Wagyu beef brand from the Kobe region of Japan. The official launch of Brant Lake Wagyu was really quite incidental after so many years in the works, according to Michelle. The owners of The George Traditional House restaurant in Okotoks had been looking for a way to pump up their beef menu and, having heard about the Balls’ Wagyu beef, approached them about the possibility of supplying product for all their beef entrees. The relationship with The George was a great starting point, adds Michelle. They gained both experience in the marketing end of the business and time to work through the logistics

of managing for a year-round supply along with the processing, packaging and labelling of their product so the Brant Lake Wagyu brand can grow from a solid foundation. “It took us out of our traditional areas in the production cycle because now we have to understand all aspects of pasture-to-plate production, distribution and retailing,” Michelle explains. They started learning the ropes by networking with other producers who have built brands and with potential restaurant and retail customers to find out about their requirements. “We felt that we can’t afford to experience downfalls along the way, so we hired a consultant with experience in branded beef products to guide us and answer questions in order to constructively move forward,” Jeff adds. “Now we have also developed a plan on how to go forward on the production side and how to expand using concepts that fit well with the traditional beef system.” The Balls are interested in developing business arrangements with cowContinued on page 18 www.canadiancattlemen.ca

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Continued from page 16

calf producers to rear the calves, which would allow them to eventually move out of the cow-calf end of it, freeing up their resources to raise bulls, finish the calves and market the beef. Their program is flexible and they are open to working with cowcalf producers from any region with herds of any size and any breed, but preferably of Angus influence. The Balls will supply Wagyu bulls with first option on the calves, or sell the bulls outright. Jeff expects it will take time to expand their program because cowcalf producers still look at traditional market signals that encourage them to shoot for maximum pounds per cow and maximum price. On the other hand, there are people who will be interested because they want to be part of something different. He sees Wagyu bulls as an excellent fit for a replacement heifer program because of their ability to consistently throw lightweight, vigorous calves that are quick to get up and go. What the producer gives up on birth and weaning weight is gained back by having a higher percentage of live calves and a premium in their system, he explains. Marbling has been their main criterion for selecting bulls through the years. Down the road as the bull program expands they will select for other characteristics including growth. They select for black hair coat, however there are red lines of Wagyu cattle with the red gene being recessive. Other traits that the Balls appreciate include the cattle’s winter hardiness due to their ability to readily deposit fat as well as the docility of the Wagyu bulls, which is unlike anything they have experienced with bulls from other breeds. On the finishing side, the Wagyupercentage calves express that same hardiness, weather-wise and healthwise. They consistently grade Canada AAA or higher, yielding an 800- to 850-pound carcass when finished after 250 to 350 days on a traditional grain-based feedlot diet without growth hormones. The beef is dryaged for 21 days resulting in flavour and an eating experience very much the same as that of Wagyu beef from the U.S., where the calves are fed 400 to 500 days. Brant Lake Wagyu’s 18 Cattlemen / August 2012

The abundant marbling is what gives Wagyu its distinctive taste. strategy is to maximize carcass quality while keeping an eye on production costs. “The timing for branded products in North America is good. The unique quality of Brant Lake Wagyu will be a fit for ‘white tablecloth’ restaurants and provide the ‘home foodies’ with a high-quality eating experience,” Jeff

Wagyu percentage calves consistently grade AAA or higher, yielding an 800- to 850-lb. carcass after 250 to 350 days on feed comments. “Before this trend, the only differentiation in beef was the store where you bought it. Now, we are seeing producer beef brands like Spring Creek, Prairie Heritage, and many organic beef labels having success because consumers are looking for variety.” Consumers are also becoming aware of the role of fat in a balanced diet and the difference between healthful and harmful fats. Recent research from the University of Alberta, supported by findings from France and Denmark, shows that natural trans fats found in the meat and milk from ruminants differ from “industrial” trans fats created through processing. No adverse effects linked to consuming natural trans fats

have been found and they may, in fact, benefit human health. The Balls highlight other favourable research specific to Wagyu cattle showing that the breed is genetically predisposed to depositing a high percentage of unsaturated fat and that Wagyu beef is an effective source of omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids. They participate in Canada’s producer-led Verified Beef Production program to provide customer assurance of food safety at the farm and feedlot levels. Brant Lake Wagyu is currently processing two to four head a week at a provincially licensed plant with plans to work up to about 10 head a week in the foreseeable future. Their beef is available from Bon Ton Meat Market in Calgary and featured at restaurants throughout the city. Moving all cuts and the grind (trim) hasn’t been a stumbling block because restaurant chefs are coming up with tasty recipes to make use of the entire beef, Michelle adds. The grind is very flavourful and juicy and has become a specialty product in itself. “We will continue to constantly build relationships with distributors, retailers and restaurateurs, while ensuring our production system is intact and our brand is what we say it is — ‘superior beef bred and fed to be the best,’” Jeff says. For more information, visit www. brantlakewagyu.ca or call 403-6843540. C — Debbie Furber www.canadiancattlemen.ca

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GRAZING

IT IS ALL IN THE HANDSHAKE

I

grew up in a small agriculture area with relatively low population density. You could see one, maybe two of your neighbour’s yardlights at night. It was very common to have the neighbour over helping with harvest or maybe we would be there helping with cattle. I grew up in a community of very down to earth, honest and hardworking people. I always looked forward to Sunday as friends would drop by after church. On rainy days, the parents would have card nights, which meant we got to play with friends and stay up late. It was a time when most deals were bartered and made on a handshake. Is that possible today? Can you make a deal on a handshake anymore? Or is that just old school? Well, some of us live in a different world today. Now we have a much more populated landscape with more urbanites moving in. There are two or three homes on every quarter now. Farming and ranching have become either a big business or a hobby. Most of the family farms are lost. Have the morals and values been lost with them? If the handshake is no longer a feasible means of making a deal, we might need a contract. 20 CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012

I have had a few contracts drafted for me over the years. For those of you who don’t know, I am a custom grazier. I rent land from my landowners, and I bring in other people’s cattle to graze. So it looks like I need a minimum of two different types of contracts, a land lease agreement and a grazing agreement.

If the handshake is no longer a feasible means of making a deal, we might need a contract My landowners are great... all 21 of them. Each one is unique and they all have different ideas and backgrounds. Some are old school and are simply retired from farming. I enjoy going for tea with these landowners as it takes me back to the days of the handshake. I have other landowners who have inherited the land but do not farm it. Maybe they grew up on the farm but left years ago. These

landowners still have an emotional tie to the land but are not too concerned about the details. I also have urbanites who just want to live in the country so they bought a chunk of land. Some are very concerned about how the land is managed and others are very new to the rural mentality. I also have an investment strategy for people who want to own land but need a little help tending Mother Nature. Will a handshake work for all these people? Not likely, so my contract comes into play. On the first year of the lease, I almost always bring out my contract. Only the old-school landowners push it away. I love that. I get to use my handshake again. For all the rest, we go through each paragraph of the contract to make sure we are all on the same page. My land lease agreement first lists the “who” and the “when,” names, addresses, email and fax of both parties. We need the date, a description of the land and the intent of the contract — all the basic lawyer stuff. Then we get into the meat and potatoes. We need to set the term of the lease with a start date and an end date. We need the rental rate, with a due date. This could be per acre, per year, per animal, www.canadiancattlemen.ca

however you have it set up. I personally like to rent on a per-acre basis. Does the rent stay the same each year or will it change annually? Is it paid up front, split payments or monthly?  Next we describe what the renter is allowed to do with the land. Is it only for pasture or could I plant wheat or corn or ginseng? What kind of management is allowed? Could I raise trout in the dugout… or not? What about sand, gravel or peat soil? Is the renter allowed to harvest any of these? Gas or oil exploration: who gets compensated and how can the lease be adjusted if any exploration or development occurs?  Another point that needs to be discussed is the beneficiary of any payment, subsidy or reimbursement from any agency, government or other, with respect of the said lands. Disaster relief, drought payouts and carbon credits are a few examples that could come up. Who gets them?  What kind of land development is allowed and who pays for it? Can we develop a water system or put in cross-fencing? Are we allowed to clear brush? Is the cross-fencing owned by the tenant or the landowner? After the lease is up, who owns the water pipe? For that matter, who is responsible for the fence repairs and who pays for the materials? If I have more than a five-year lease, I cover all fencing costs. If I have less than five years on a piece of land, I supply the labour and equipment, the landowner provides the posts and wire.  One other point I deal with is who holds the hunting rights on the land? With cattle on the land late into the fall and winter, I like to know who is out there with a gun during hunting season. I always try to reserve hunting rights. I also get to use this as a bargaining tool. I can then provide another landowner with hunting privileges to more land in return for a better deal on his land. I have some landowners who purchase the land just so they can hunt. I found that the best way to control hunting on my land is to allow hunting by one person. Then they police it.  Then we finish off the contract with more lawyer talk. Consequences of default, disagreement resolution, heirs and successors, etc. etc. etc. and last but not least, signatures. Dated and witnessed.  www.canadiancattlemen.ca

My contract is three legal pages long. Phew! That is a lot of work for all those landowners every year. But wait, it is not that much work. After I prove myself to my landowners, once the first contract expires, it seems my handshake is valid again. The biggest part of my business is human resources so developing good business relationships is very important to me. I work at it. So, is the handshake dead? I am quite proud of the fact that currently, of my 21 different landowners, I have one active contract still valid. All the rest are now a simple handshake. I

have found that even just going through the contract so that all the possibilities have been discussed, makes a big difference. If you are looking at renting some land, I would advise you to take these points and have your lawyer draft something up. In the long run it is well worth the time and money invested to have the details in writing. I hope this helps set you in the right direction. Next month I’ll touch on my cattle contract. By the way, if you ever see me at a seminar or conference, I would be happy to shake your hand. C — Steve Kenyon

Cattlemen / August 2012 21

N u t r i t i o n

by John McKinnon [email protected]

The cost of energy is rising and I am not talking oil! John McKinnon is a beef cattle nutritionist at the University of Saskatchewan

O

ne of the facts of life that we face today, is that the cost of energy is rising, whether we are dealing with transportation, home heating or feeding cattle. As I write this, December corn futures are well above $7. With issues such as drought in the U.S. and continued high domestic and international demand for corn, it is very likely that corn supplies will remain tight and as a result, prices will remain under pressure. Here in Canada, Statistics Canada indicates that while seeded barley acreage was up by 15 per cent over 2011, relative to a decade ago, seeded acreage is still significantly depressed. As with corn, feed barley prices are high, particularly in southern Alberta where prices of $5.50 to $6 a bushel are not uncommon. Combine this with tight feeder supplies and excess pen capacity; it is very likely that feeding margins will remain tight. One of the cornerstones on which the Canadian feeding industry was built, was the fact that it had a competitive advantage to its North American counterparts in terms of performance, feed efficiency and cost of gain. Much of this competitive advantage was based on the fact that we had a ready supply of cheap feed grains, particularly, barley. Prior to the “ethanol boom” the U.S. feeding industry also relied on a cheap source of feed grains, namely corn. While I have been around long enough to know that you “never say never,” it appears to me that the days of cheap feed grains are gone. If you don’t believe me, ask yourself, in today’s grain market, would you grow canola or barley? The yellow hue across Western Canada at the moment, gives you the answer. Some might ask — what is the concern with higher feed grain prices, after all, have we not been enjoying near-record fat cattle prices? The answer to this question lies in how we manage backgrounding programs for calves and finishing programs for heavier calves and yearlings, particularly the fact that these programs were developed in the era of cheap feed grains. Typically lightweight calves are backgrounded for 150 to 180 days while yearlings are on high grain rations for 125 to 150 days. Today’s finishing programs regularly take cattle up to 1,400 to 1,500 pounds on rations of 85 to 90 per cent grain. For 1,000-pound cattle eating 18 or 19 pounds of barley a day, the difference between $3- and $6-a-bushel barley, is over $1 per head per day! Multiply this over 150 days and 10,000 head and you start to see the pressure high feed grain prices put on feeding margins.

22 Cattlemen / August 2012

Now don’t get me wrong, this is not the first time that the cattle-feeding sector has faced tight margins. Some would say margins have been in a vise grip for the last decade. However, if the current situation continues, I believe the industry is going to have to take a serious look at how it operates. First and foremost, efficiency will have to remain at the forefront of feeding management. For mainstream beef producers, use of new technologies that put on more pounds of beef with fewer feed resources will continue to be critical to profitability. While there is some resistance to the use of implants, ionophores and repartitioning agents (beta agonists), there is no doubt that when used according to approved label dosages, these products dramatically improve feed efficiency. Can we afford not to use such technology? We also have to take a serious look at reducing the number of days cattle spend on high grain rations. This could involve alternative calf growing programs that incorporate a greater use of forage and for extending the time yearling cattle are extensively managed, perhaps through strategic supplementation with byproduct feeds while extending the time they are on grass in the fall. One of the limitations we have to achieving this goal is that there has not been a great deal of emphasis on funding foragebreeding research in Canada and as a result we have limited access to new varieties bred specifically for forage quality. There is also a need to search for alternatives to barley and corn as primary energy sources in our diets. Distillers grains are a great example of how byproducts can be used to replace a significant proportion of barley or corn in finishing diets. Other byproducts that can also be used to replace a portion of the grain include canola meal, canola screenings and fortified grain screening pellets. Current research is evaluating strategic blends of various byproduct feeds that vary in the source of energy and protein in order to target nutritional needs of different classes of cattle. An approach that can be used is to eliminate grain feeding for backgrounding calves and significantly reduce the amount fed to finishing cattle. We may very well look back at this period as one of those pivotal points in the cattlefeeding industry’s development where the pace of change is moving so fast that it threatens our ability to adapt. Failure to adapt, however, is only an option for those who want to watch from the sidelines. www.canadiancattlemen.ca

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OPINION

OUR COW HERD HAS BEEN DECIMATED

24 CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012

5.5

Canadian beef cow numbers January 1

5.0 4.5 4.0 3.5 3.0 09 12

06

00 03

97

94

91

88

82 85

79

2.5 70 73 76

word much misused these days is “decimate.” It is most often used now to describe a catastrophic or destructive event. It really means the removal of one in 10, which was serious enough at its origins when the victor in war was wreaking vengeance on the vanquished by slaughtering one in 10. By those standards the Canadian beef breeding herd has been “double decimated” because since 2005 two out of every 10 cows have been removed from the national herd. Today’s herd is the smallest since 1995 but production is still about seven per cent higher than it was in 2005 due to increased carcass weights. Still, the decline in production between 2010 and 2011 was 14 per cent, the largest year-to-year decline ever, barring the forced reduction in supply by 20 per cent in 2003. This is occurring at a time when Canada is winning new or restored market access to a number of markets beyond the U.S. and Mexico and necessarily raises the question of whether we can become reliable suppliers and fully exploit these export opportunities. I have been mulling these matters over a lot lately and have begun to wonder if all the players in the industry are reading the same book, let alone on the same page. From a producer’s perspective it’s pretty straightforward. Their production decisions are grounded pretty firmly in the requirement for profitable production or, if not that, the reliable expectation of profitable production in the immediate future. Producers are probably interested in how much product we can export to Japan or the EU or Taiwan but they cannot be expected to increase production unless and until they can clearly see real prospects of profitable production over the long term. Since 2010 cow-calf production has been more rewarding but most

Million head

A

So how are we going to supply new export markets?

SOURCE: CANFAX AND STATISTICS CANADA producers realize these improved calf prices are largely a function of reduced supply. Add to that, in many parts of the country the opportunity to shift into more grain production and less cattle production has been apparent. That shift is obviously taking place right now. In addition, cattle-feeding profits are being severely squeezed by the somewhat unusual combination of higher feeding costs and higher replacement prices, so producers could be forgiven for being dubious about how long weaned calf and feeder prices can remain as strong as they are today. But from an industry perspective, these developing export market opportunities are real and what is needed is much better information flowing to producers to help them make sound production decisions. Right now at the midpoint of 2012 (I am writing this on Canada Day) we have enough data to recognize that

there has been no move yet to increase the size of the breeding herd. Cow culling appears to be down about three per cent but that means nothing when the herd is four per cent smaller than it was two years ago. On the heifer side it looks like the number of heifers slaughtered or destined for slaughter is up about one per cent, so there is no chance at all that the herd will show any growth this year. Whether the breeding herd is static at the bottom of its cycle or continuing to shrink, albeit slowly, is of little consequence. What is of consequence is the certainty that, aside from further increases in average carcass weights there will now be no possibility of a supply increase before 2015 at the earliest. That is because any herd growth must now come from weaned heifer calves that might be retained in the fall of 2012, bred in 2013 and calve in 2014. So their marketable offspring www.canadiancattlemen.ca

will not reach market before mid-2015. Wishful thinking will not change the biology of the cow. In these circumstances one wonders how we might take advantage of the emerging opportunities coming from trade liberalization and expanding market access before 2015 or 2016. The main prospect I see, is the cattle and beef we now ship to the U.S. At the moment Canada continues to export over 40 per cent of its beef production to the U.S. That in itself is somewhat ironic since the U.S. is exporting huge quantities of beef to several world markets and could not maintain those export shipments at current levels unless it continues to augment its domestic supply with live slaughter and feeder cattle from Canada. Those live exports represent a supply that could be slaughtered and processed in Canada and then exported to other markets if (and only if) those markets provide unhindered access at better prices than can be secured in the U.S. We probably should not be in any doubt that there are higher-priced markets for our high-quality beef than the U.S. Why else would the U.S. have exported over one million tonnes valued at $4.4 billion to markets beyond their own and the Canadian market in 2011? If they can find those markets so can we. C — Charlie Gracey Charlie Gracey is a longtime advocate for the beef industry and recently retired director of the Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency.

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VET ADVICE

Veterinarians must be stewards of animal welfare

A

nimal welfare is instinctive for veterinarians. While not always transparent, animal welfare has been an integral part of veterinary education and daily life in practice from the very beginning. It is the real reason many pursue veterinary medicine as a career. As society alters its attitude about animal care, veterinarians have much to do to heighten public awareness about their role in animal welfare. In the words of Dr. Bonnie Beaver, professor, Texas A and M University, and diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists, “It is our charge to serve the public. That demand continually positions veterinarians as the ‘go to’ profession interfacing between scientists, producers and the general population.” Somewhere less than two per cent of North Americans are involved in primary agriculture. It is generally recognized that more than 95 per cent of the population is at least three generations off the farm. A high percentage have never seen a live cow, chicken or pig. The disconnect between what the public thinks and reality should not be a surprise. The majority of consumers view beefsteak as a commodity from the meat counter, not cattle grazing contently on lush pastures, or a steer in a feedlot thousands of miles away. How the profession responds will impact its long-term ability to lead the charge in animal welfare. Non-sciencebased groups such as animal activists and humane organizations claim they know what’s best. Relationships forged between industry and the veterinary profession are often openly criticized as being self-serving. The majority of the applicants seeking entry into veterinary colleges today come from the “three generations off the farm” category of students. The approach to educating undergraduates about animal welfare in an already crowded veterinary curricula has been difficult, but is slowly changing, as is the uptake of animal welfare’s importance as a component of large-animal practice. Less than one-third of faculty members teaching animal welfare in veterinary schools are veterinarians. There is little doubt that the science is incomplete about many aspects of animal welfare. At present there are missing links between the ability to scientifically assess animal welfare objectively and underlying ethical issues. This lack of key scientific information often overrides the logical explanation of how we use animals. The veterinary profession’s responsibility in promoting and assuring the health and welfare of animals is incontestable. Health and welfare simply cannot be viewed as separate issues. Inherent in the training they receive, veterinarians must assume the important role of providing expertise and knowledge to a wide range of people including the general public, the livestock industry and policy-makers. In 2011, the European Commission and Federation

26 CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012

of Veterinarians of Europe organized the first regional workshops on animal welfare dedicated to the veterinary practitioner. The workshops provided veterinarians with a deeper understanding of animal welfare, applicable animal welfare legislation, critical welfare issues and species-specific welfare assessment protocols. The challenge today is that the parameters we use to gauge production often have little validity to consumers in terms of how welfare affects the quality of the products they buy. Their measures of quality are things like animal health, animal behaviour and physiological responses to the environment in which animals live, and all of these are time consuming to measure and require special skills and knowledge to assess. Being able to accurately assess health, behaviour and the body’s response to the way animals are cared for will become a part of animal welfare labelling. Developing the ability to classify welfare against measurable standards will ultimately translate into transparent and reliable information for use by an industry under unrelenting scrutiny. Animal-based welfare measures regardless of species must be scientifically sound, measurable and feasible. European welfare assessment protocols are based on 12 criteria that can be objectively measured. For example, nutrition is assessed using body condition scoring and measuring the physical placement of water sources. Housing conditions are assessed based on thermal comfort, the ability to rest comfortably and ease of movement. Absence of pain induced by management procedures, absence of disease and absence of injury become measurable health parameters. Objective methods of measuring behaviour have been built around the ability to express appropriate social behaviour, a positive emotional state and appropriate human-animal relationships. Markets for food derived from animals are about to be governed by animal welfare standards developed by both private and public sectors. Industry initiatives like Codes of Practice specific to individual sectors and Canadian Livestock Transport certification training programs have been a major step forward for animal welfare. Development of objective techniques to assess welfare will be the next important achievement. The veterinary profession finds itself at a critical junction in becoming eager players, educators and advocates for animal welfare. Involvement of those specifically trained in all aspects of the well-being of animals is part of gaining what has been dubbed the social licence for industry to operate. The public’s trust that we are doing things right is golden. Dr. Ron Clarke prepares this column on behalf of the Western Canadian Association of Bovine Practitioners. Suggestions for future articles can be sent to Canadian Cattlemen ([email protected] fbcpublishing.com) or WCABP ([email protected]).

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

HOLISTIC RANCHING

Midsummer grazing

T

wo months ago I listed the ing poor growing conditions. This again is the exact benefits of and described opposite of what the plants require. the process of planned grazBasing our moves on monitoring the grass in the ing. Planned grazing utilizes pasture where the cattle are will give us the exact a short graze period, a high stock opposite of what the plants require. The only excepdensity and a recovery period that tion to this will be in a “normal” year. allows full recovery of the plants. In planned grazing we monitor the regrowth in the The main benefit is healthier land first pasture we grazed. Let’s say we plan to have a resulting in increased production five-day graze period, a 75-day recovery period and from a set land base. we are using 16 pastures. If we have a normal year Planned grazing is based on monitoring how our monitoring would tell us that 75 days will give us quickly the plants are recovering from the previfull recovery. We would stay with our five-day graze ous graze. The speed of the regrowth will reflect the and everything works according to plan. growing conditions we are experiencing. Monitoring In a year with good growing conditions our moniallows us to increase or decrease our recovery period. toring will tell us that full recovery will take less than The idea is to have full recovery of the plants in all 75 days. Under these conditions we can shorten our growing conditions. Once full recovery is achieved graze period to four days and achieve a recovery of the plants are grazed a second time. Grazing in this 60 days. manner will be beneficial to the plants and the land. In a year with poor growing conditions our moniAchieving full recovery toring will tell us that is essential. The best full recovery will take indicator that plants are more than 75 days. fully recovered is that Most of us have an idea of how Under these conditions the plants are ready to we can lengthen our flower. There is no ben- much grass we would like to leave graze period to six days efit in going past full in a pasture when we move our and achieve a recovery recovery. A longer recovof 90 days. Full recovery period will result in cattle. The severity of the graze will ery is essential to proper declining nutrition and grazing. Recovery is a slowing or stopping of determine the amount of grass left increased or decreased photosynthesis. by changing the severity Many people struggle of the graze. The followwith monitoring. Most of us have an idea of how ing chart shows how the graze period, recovery period much grass we would like to leave in a pasture when and the severity of the graze are linked. All of these we move our cattle. The severity of the graze will are correct for different growing conditions. determine the amount of grass left (residual). We need to change the severity of the graze and the residual Year Graze period Recovery Severity grass to alter our recovery period. Changing the Average 5 75 Moderate severity of the graze is essential to allow the plants to achieve full recovery under all growing conditions. Good 4 60 Light Let me explain what happens when you base your Poor 6 90 Severe moves on monitoring the grass in the pasture where the cattle are. In a year with excellent growing conditions you will tend to stay longer than required. This Many producers struggle with moving away from happens because with excellent conditions grass prograss. Remember, there is no waste in nature. The duction will be good. Since production is good it will more grass we can leave behind the quicker our land require more days to get to the amount of residual we will improve. Proper grazing requires varying the think is best. In effect we are increasing our recovery severity of the graze and the residual left. Monitoring period during good growing conditions. This is the will give us the confidence that we are making good exact opposite of what the plants require. decisions. Planned grazing is beneficial. Better manNow let’s look at a year with poor growing condiagement pays. Have a great grazing season. tions. If we base our moves on monitoring the grass in Happy trails. the pasture where the cattle are we will tend to move — Don Campbell too quickly. Since grass production will be low due to the poor growing conditions it will require fewer Don Campbell ranches with his family at Meadow Lake, days to get to the amount of residual we think is best. Sask., and teaches Holistic Management courses. He can be In effect we are decreasing our recovery period durreached at 306-236-6088 or [email protected]

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012 27

MANAGEMENT

MINIMIZE SHRINK

M

ature cattle may carry nearly 30 per cent of their weight in the gut (and bladder), and may lose a lot of weight quickly if held off feed and water for 24 hours or if they pass a lot of manure and urine in a short time, as when exercising or excited. You can figure a loss of eight to 10 pounds per defecation or urination; a gallon of fluid weighs about eight pounds. This type of weight loss is called shrink. Shrink losses of up to 10 per cent of body weight are not uncommon in cattle held off feed and water for 24 hours, and in some circumstances shrinks of up to 18 per cent can occur. Part of this loss is not just fluid from the digestive tract and bladder; some of the weight loss is from body tissues — due to physiologic factors triggered by stress. Dr. A.L. Schaefer of the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada research centre in Lacombe, Alta., has worked on several studies addressing problems associated with shrink, and the impact of transport. “I was trained as a physiologist. Lacombe Research Centre has a program on meat science, and the meat scientists told me they were seeing muscle shrink and dark cutters and wondered what was happening with these cattle. Transport

28 CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012

and handling creates a novel environment for cattle and they are adversely affected by this stress. They’ve never had anything in their history to prepare them for this,” he says. They are not programmed to handle being gathered and sorted, weighed, held overnight in pens without feed, loading or unloading, or long truck transport. The “fear stress” experienced by cattle in these situations can be as detrimental as physical stress. Cattle sent to slaughter often experience several hours of transport, after which they are held in pens overnight prior to slaughter — and typically lose six per cent or more of their live and carcass weight. They often display degradation in meat quality parameters such as pH, colour and marbling score. “So we started to measure some of the stressors. At that time, the attitude in the beef industry was that it was just gastrointestinal tract water being lost — that shrink is just a loss of fluid from the gut. Many people actually thought shrink is good, to get the fluid out of there so the buyer doesn’t have to pay for useless water,” says Schaefer. “This perception is far from the truth. Over the years we’ve done studies to look at composition of fluid loss.

We did total dissections of slaughtered animals, comparing the ones with greater shrink with those of lesser shrink, to see where weight loss was coming from. We learned that about half the weight loss was from the GI tract and about half was actually from muscle tissue. There can be loss of muscle in finished animals, resulting in a reduction in carcass yield and quality,” he says. “Then we looked at various kinds of physiological insults, and it makes sense. Animals lose their muscle sugar (glycogen) and become hypoglycemic (with low blood sugar and low muscle sugar). They become dehydrated and lose interstitial water (fluid outside the muscle cells). The meat scientists found that when animals lost this fluid from the tissues their meat became tougher. The shear forces (pressure needed to cut a steak) and taste (as determined by food-tasting panel) changed dramatically,” he says. “It’s similar to grapes versus raisins. When grapes lose water they become raisins (smaller, thicker, chewier). The muscle tissue lost a lot of the positive ions, particularly sodium and potassium. Cattle break down muscle because they are trying to free up carbon on the amino acids, so the carbon can be used to make more glucose www.canadiancattlemen.ca

— to counteract the loss.” These are survival mechanisms the body has developed, to survive in times of stress and feed/water deprivation. “There is a chronology and time frame to all of these changes, depending on how far cattle are transported, etc. This explained a lot about why there was weight loss, it was partly muscle tissue and not just urine and feces,” says Schaefer. Dr. Colin Palmer of the department of large-animal clinical sciences at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine in Saskatoon, says shrink is often misunderstood — especially the drawbacks to cattle health. Cattle always do better if they are not excessively shrunk during this stressful time. “Auction markets tell me that a lot of buyers don’t want cattle unless they are shrunk. If you offer them calves with no shrink taken off, they won’t buy those. Some buyers will pay more money for shrunk calves (off feed for at least 20 hours) than they will in a pre-sort sale where there’s not as much shrink,” says Palmer. Many

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buyers still prefer to buy “shrunk” cattle, not realizing how adversely this can affect their health, particularly young cattle. “That energy and water that’s been lost is very important,” says Schaefer. “Fluid and material in the stomachs is what gives cattle energy to counteract stress. It’s crucial to keep them fed and watered.” He recently talked with some farmers who were raising grass-fed calves. “They told me they bought some five-weight calves, fed them for two months, and sold them — and they were still five-weight calves. They shrank about 50 pounds at sale time.” Several studies have looked at ways to help minimize shrink when selling cattle, including various types of diets before transport. One study showed that by allowing calves to consume forage immediately before being sorted and shipped can reduce the amount of shrink by up to 2.9 per cent. It helps if they are not “empty” before a long truck ride. Another

study showed that feeding ionophores like Rumensin reduces shrink by 0.2 to 1.5 per cent. Electrolyte supplementation ahead of time can also help reduce the amount of shrink, but more research is needed to determine which electrolyte (or combination of electrolytes and at what levels) is most beneficial. Newly weaned calves (and their mothers if a person is selling open cows right after weaning their calves) suffer the most shrink because they are too upset and stressed to eat or drink. Giving them a chance to adjust to weaning and be more relaxed and back on feed can greatly reduce their stress and shrink. “In a study at Kansas State University and University of Arkansas, Dr. Kenneth Coffey reported that steers gathered at daybreak from pasture and placed in holding pens without feed or water shrank at the rate of 1.25 per cent of body weight per hour during the first two to 2.5 hours, and Continued on page 30 Barbed Wire Fence

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Continued from page 29

1.61 per cent of body weight during the next 2.5 to three hours,” says Palmer. Cattle shrink the most at first, especially when sorted in corrals. Cattle tend to defecate and urinate more when they are nervous, and empty out fairly quickly. “I’ve talked with the Ministry of Agriculture here and suggested that we need to do more educational talks about marketing. We can talk about good management when producing cattle, and sorting off open cows to sell, but if our farmers are taking too much pencil shrink at the auction, this affects their bottom line more than all the things we can do to try to help them,” says Palmer. A person may have to select the markets that give the best deal in terms of pencil shrink. Probably the most important thing, however, is to reduce the initial shrink when gathering, sorting, and transporting cattle. “More gentle handling and not having them stand around in a corral (or in the truck) for very long before you get them on the road is always helpful,” he says. There are many factors involved in how much a certain animal shrinks, and one of the biggest factors is stress. The way cattle deal with this type of stress is detrimental to their health. “Their entire stress mechanism is triggered (the HPA system­ — hypothalamic pituitary adrenal response — in which cortisol is produced). This breaks down muscle and fat, for provision of glucose,” says Schaefer. “It’s not surprising that some calves have eight to 10 per cent shrink in these situations. With finished cattle, this is why feedlots try to have sameday slaughter, to stop this weight loss as soon as possible. With young calves, when they are weaned and shipped and go into feedlots, the cortisol has had a damaging impact on their immune system, as well,” says Schaefer. This creates more risk for illness. Preconditioning calves before sale (weaning several weeks ahead of transport, having them vaccinated, etc.) can help reduce this risk. During this period they can become accustomed to gentle handling and are not just fresh off the range (scared and wild). “Any time you can acclimate calves to handling and a new environment, they will 30 Cattlemen / August 2012

be more at ease and will shrink less at sale time,” he says. Video sales may have an advantage because there’s less transport and handling involved. The cattle are going directly from the farm/ranch to their destination rather than being trucked to a sale yard, waiting there for a day or so, and trucked again to a feedlot. Some auction markets are now offering video sales as well, but some buyers still want to see the animals and get a feel for what they are as a package. In these situations there is a lot more handling and mixing of cattle and it’s hard on them. “Solutions to these situations involve many factors. It’s been said that the first step in solving a problem is to

There are many factors involved in how much an certain animal shrinks, and one of the biggest factors is stress understand it. Once you understand the insults these calves are going through, you can try to find ways to minimize problems. One approach we have here at Lacombe is to provide calves with more energy before they are shipped, and making sure they have the necessary positive ions in their systems,” says Schaefer. “We’ve found that some of the amino acids are very effective at reducing protein breakdown. One amino acid called tryptophan is used by the nervous system in cattle and helps calm them so they don’t perceive the stressors as being quite as threatening. This amino acid can be helpful in reducing shrink. You can provide a ‘cow Gatorade’ type of product that contains some of these necessary nutrients,” says Schaefer. “We did some work with IBP with several thousand animals that demonstrated better retention of weight (less shrink). These animals had a per cent or two less weight loss. The cattle treated with nutritional therapy also showed a three- to fourfold reduction in incidence of DFD (dark-firm-dry) meat. Using economic values for beef

at the time of the study, the economic impact of using nutritional therapy for cattle held in pens before slaughter was about $22 per head for 800- to 900-pound carcasses.” When preparing to send calves to market, there might be times a nutritional therapy would be beneficial. “You can provide this product in feed if the calves are used to eating a creep feed or mineral mix. We’ve also tried putting these things into the water for calves when they arrive in the pens. It all depends on what the cattle are used to. If a calf has never seen a waterer and has only drunk from a pond or stream, it may not work,” says Schaefer. This is the advantage of preconditioning, so the calves can become accustomed to new ways to access feed and water. Then the calves are better able to tolerate the stresses they will encounter at sale time. “The industry needs to work together, to understand and address these challenges. We still have buyers who want raw, shrunk-out calves. They need to realize that this is not a healthy or beneficial situation for these animals, and that it would be helpful to pay producers more for preconditioned cattle,” says Schaefer. Then the person receiving the cattle will have less health problems or setbacks in their weight gain. “It becomes a win-win situation. The animals’ welfare improves and producers/buyers make more money in the end. Today, consumers also want to know how their meat was raised. This would be a good selling point for the industry if we could tell the consumer these calves were nurtured with care from the beginning, and here’s how they were prepared for transport.” They didn’t suffer the stresses and problems that cattle traditionally go through at sale time. “These cattle could bring a premium, and hopefully the system could pass some of that premium back to the producer.” The only real incentive the producer has, to do some of these things, is if he gets paid to do them. “In our studies we’ve also looked at problems like bovine respiratory disease in calves. If they are better prepared to come through transport and handling with less stress and shrink — they are also better able to hold off respiratory viruses,” says Schaefer. C — Heather Smith Thomas www.canadiancattlemen.ca

auction market Directory Regular cattle sale every Tuesday 9 am Please check our website for all special sales.

Brooks, AB. Ph: (403) 362-5521 Fax: (403) 362-5541 Website: www.bowslope.com E-mail: [email protected] Rod MacLean 793-3060 Lachie McKinnon 362-1825 Ross Annett 793-4715 Lowell Johnston 820-0516

Serving Alberta’s Livestock Industry since 1940 Regular Sale Every Friday 9 AM • DLMS Sales Every Thurs 10 AM SEPTEMBER SALES • Wed Oct 31 - Calf • Wed Nov 28 - Bred Cow • Fri Sept 7 - 72 Annual & Heifer, 12:00 noon Sale – Charolais & Limo Yearling Sale, 11:00 AM influence, 10:00 AM DECEMBER SALES • Mon Sept 17 - Annual • Sat Dec 1 - Bred Cow & NOVEMBER SALES Sheep Sale, 1:00 PM • Sat Nov 3 - Rancher Calf Heifer Sale, 12:00 Noon • Fri Sept 21 - Special Sale, 10:00 AM • Mon Dec 3 - Last Yearling Sale, 11:00 AM • Mon Nov 5 - Calf Chance All Breeds Calf • Wed Sept 26 Sale – Angus influence, Sale, 10:00 AM Last Chance Horse Sale, 10:00 AM • Wed Dec 5 - Bred 5:30PM Cow & Heifer Sale, • Wed Nov 7 - Calf OCTOBER SALES 12:00 noon Sale – Charolais & Limo • Mon Oct 22 - Calf • Sat Dec 8 - Bred Cow & influence, 10:00 AM Sale - Angus influence, • Mon Nov 12 - All Breeds Heifer Sale, 12:00 Noon 10:00 AM • Wed Dec 12 - Bred Calf Sale, 10:00 AM • Tue Oct 23 - Calf Sale, • Wed Nov 14 - All Breeds cow & Heifer sale, 10:00 AM 12:00 noon Calf Sale, 10:00 AM • Wed Oct 24 - Calf • Sat Nov 17 - First Bred • Sat Dec 15 - Bred cow & Sale - Charolais & Limo Cow & Heifer Sale, Heifer sale, 12:00 noon influence, 10:00 AM 10:00 AM • Wed Dec 19 - Bred • Sat Oct 27 - Rancher • Wed Nov 21 - All Breeds cow & Heifer sale, Calf Sale, 10:00 AM Calf Sale, 10:00 AM 12:00 noon • Sun Oct 29 - Calf • Sat Nov 24 - Bred Cow • Fri Dec 21 - LAST SALE. Sale – Angus influence, & Heifer Sale, 12:00 Office Closed 10:00 AM Noon Dec 22 - Jan 9,2013

Office - 204-434-6519 • Fax - 204-434-9367 Email - [email protected] Harold Unrau - 204-871-0250 (cell) - manager Henry Penner - 204-355-7518

www.grunthallivestockauctionmart.com

zXX

Innisfail

auctIon Market

Regular Cattle Sales — Every Wednesday Special Fall Feeder Sales — Every Monday Horse Sales Every 2 Weeks

The Heart of Alberta’s Finest Feeder Cattle 4504 – 42 St., Innisfail, AB T4G 1P6 403-227-3166 • 1-800-710-3166 [email protected] • www.innisfailauctionmarket.com Jack, Danny, Duane and Mark Daines

AUCTION MARKET LTD.

In the hub of the livestock industry since 1967

SPECIAL SALES Calf Sales. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Every.Mon ..&.Wed .,.Oct ..to.Dec .,.10.am Stock Cows & Bred Heifer Sales . . . . . . . Every.Tues .,.Nov ..to.Dec .,.1.pm Special Yearling Sales . . . . . . . . . . Every.Thurs .,.Sept ..to.Oct .,.11:30.am Pre-Sort Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Every.Sat .,.Oct ..to.Nov . For a complete listing of our sales visit www.perlich.com Or contact us by phone at:

403-329-3101

We’re.3.miles.East.of.Lethbridge.on.Highway.3.&.¼.mile.South.on.the.Broxburn.Rd .

Picture Butte Auction Market

Box 6, Picture Butte,

Connection AB T0K 1V0 Your Total Auction

Reg. Feeder & Slaughter Cattle Sales–Tues. 10:30 a.m. Reg. Cattle, Hog, Sheep Sales – Sat. 11 a.m. Special Calf Sales in the Fall Phone 403-732-4400 Fax 403-732-4405

Owner/Auctioneer: Erik Dunsbergen Office: Jenn Koot

All calf sales are pre-booked sales. Call early for a good spot.

Alberta’s Largest Producer Owned Auction Market

K.L.C.

Kawartha Lakes Co-operative Auction

580 Woodville Rd. RR#3 Woodville, Ontario

Calgary Stockyards “The Hub of Livestock Marketing”

Livestock Auctions every Saturday Stocker Sales - Wednesdays in Spring & Fall * Chicken, Rabbits and misc farm items: 9:00 a.m. * Pigs, Sheep & Goats: Ring #2 at 10 a.m. * Cull cows, bulls, finished cattle, bob calves, horses, stockers, bred cows, cow/calf pairs: Ring # 1 at 10:00 a.m.

Feeder cattle sales every Friday. Slaughter cattle sales weekdays. Broadcasting Ring Sales Daily

Regular cattle sales every Thursday. Special calf sales Saturdays.

For more info. call 705-439-4444 • www.klcauction.com

www.teamauctionsales.com

www.calgarystockyards.com

TEAM “Bringing Buyers and Sellers together through the Power of the Internet”

403-234-7429

Special Calf Sales Mondays throughout the Fall

vJv Foothills Livestock auction Box 10, Stavely, AB T0L 1Z0 email: [email protected] Rob Bergevin, Manager 403-625-7171 (cell) Sales Barn 403-549-2120 Fax: 403-549-2253

Toll Free: 1-877-549-2121 Regular sales eveRy FRiday at 9 a.m. For all your marketing needs please give us a call or stop by!

www.vjvfoothillsauction.com

Meadow Lake Stockyards Ltd. • Regular Cattle Sales - Monday’s 9:30 a.m. • Presorted Internet Calf Sales - Thursday’s 11:00 a.m. • Regular Monthly Horse Sales - Friday’s • Bred Cow & Heifer Sales scheduled throughout the fall - 1:00 pm

Order buying services available. For sale information & market info. visit our website www.mlstockyards.com Brent Brooks (306) 240-5340 Brad Brooks (306) 240-5342

Blair Brooks (306) 240-9883 office (306) 236-3411

E-mail: [email protected]

OntariO LivestOck exchange inc. P.O. BOx 443 WaterlOO, OntariO n2J 4a9

Phone: (519) 884-2082 Or 1-800-265-8818 Website: www.olex.on.ca e-mail: [email protected] CONTACT LIVE SALES SPECIAL SALES

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

Welcome to

David Ropp (519) 749-5072 Allen Colwell (519) 501-0147 Wednesday - 1:00 PM - Vaccinated Feeder Cattle Thursday - 11:00 AM - Regular Stocker Sale Daily internet presort sales & direct from ranch sales. Contributing markets: Moose Jaw, Swift Current, Provost, Lloydminster, Vermilion, Yorkton, Maple Creek, Meadow Lake, Mankota, Assiniboia, Weyburn

FEEDER/SLAUGHTER SALES SHEEP & GOAT SALE Every Friday 9AM Every Friday 9AM Receiving open until Receiving open until 11PM Thursdays 11PM Thursdays Gates Open Mon.-Wed. 8AM-4PM Thurs. 8AM-11PM Friday 8AM-6PM Sat. 8AM-4PM For more information call: 204-694-8328 or Jim Christie 204-771-0753 www.winnipeglivestocksales.com Licence #1122



Clip and keep these directories for future reference! Cattlemen / august 2012 31

Auction Market SPECIAL

K

KEN HURLBURT JOINS THE LMAC HALL OF FAME

en Hurlburt, former owner of the Fort Macleod Auction Market in Fort Macleod, Alta., was selected by his peers this summer as the 2012 inductee into the Livestock Markets Association of Canada (LMAC) hall of fame. LMAC president Jim Abel of Stettler, Alta., says the association’s nominating committee made a great choice in selecting Hurlburt. “Ken has dedicated his life to the livestock industry and to the markets. He has influenced a lot of people, not only in the industry, but in his community and beyond through his involvement in politics.” Hurlburt was one of the pioneers who broke away from the domination of the large terminal markets in Calgary, Edmonton, Saskatoon and Winnipeg. At that time, a farmer’s only option was to sell to a drover, or load cattle on a rail car bound for a terminal market, where they would be unloaded at the adjoining stockyard and auctioned off to a slaughter plant or eastern feedlot. Lots of weaned calves ended up going straight to slaughter in the fall if they couldn’t be finished on the farm because there wasn’t a finishing industry out west and only so many were needed down east. In time a network of country markets sprung up within driving distance of the farms, which lowered the cost of transport for producers and the stress on the cattle, changing the scope of how livestock were marketed in Canada. “Kudos to the rural auction market developers for seeing a need for country markets and giving farmers more marketing opportunities,” says Abel. “It wasn’t without struggle and they stuck it out. There was huge adversity on the part of the bankers who were not comfortable with this fundamental change. Farmers liked it and supported it and in the end it’s the way producers and buyers wanted to buy and sell cattle and led to the demise of the terminal markets.” The Hurlburts, along with partners Ted Nicholls and John Milne, established the Fort Macleod Auction Market in 1960. Ken and his wife, ReNee, recall hosting many buyers from the East at their ranch every fall when they would make the trip to Fort Macleod to find good ranch calves. It was all part of doing business, but it was the people part of the livestock business that Hurlburt most enjoyed. He built his reputation and that of the market on fair and honest business dealings and to this day wholeheartedly believes that auctions are the most honest way of selling goods because they offer free and open competition in the public eye. Looking back on his long career in the livestock industry, he says that some of his most gratifying moments were those at the end of a successful sale chatting with satisfied consignors and buyers. Hurlburt, who was raised in Milk River where his father was a grain buyer, pegs his start in the livestock industry to 1947, when he gave up a good-paying job surveying with a highway crew to follow his heart’s desire and take a job as a cattle buyer with his friend, Bob Dogertom at the Lethbridge Stockyards for $75 a month. That was a time when livestock

32 CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012

Ken and ReNee Hurlburt dealers worked the farms across the countryside and Ken started out buying one or two animals at a time. He later signed on with W.C. Johnson, a Winnipeg company, when they established a southern Alberta buying station and a couple of years after that, he and Ted established their own business, Nicholls and Hurlburt, Livestock Order Buying. They also opened a feedlot just south of Lethbridge. Unfortunately that first business venture went under when foot-and-mouth brought the cattle trade to a standstill in 1952. He enrolled in the Western College of Auctioneering in Billings in 1953 and took a job in farm sales with Warren Cooper and the Community Auction Sales Association, while establishing Hurlburt Auction House in Lethbridge. It wasn’t long before his aptitude for auctioneering led him into the limelight. He remembers working a tough sale in 1953 when steers were going for 14 cents a pound. He put out a challenge to the buyers that if anyone offered 20 cents a pound, he would ride the steer. He rode the steer. From the fall of 1953 to 1958, he sold for Calgary Public Stockyards four days a week, Pincher Creek on Fridays and Medicine Hat and Walsh on Saturdays. Those were the days when cattle were sold outdoors alongside the tracks. Whenever snow or rain blew a tube in the amp, he’d saddle up a horse and call the sale from the centre of the ring. He also hired on as a consultant to the St. Boniface Stockyards, commuting by train to St. Boniface for two years helping to build up the business. At the time, it was said to be the largest stockyard in the British Commonwealth, selling out of six rings at the same time. He also had the opportunity during this era to sell cattle at the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto, the Calgary Bull Sale (the largest in North America at the time), and the Pacific National Exhibition in Vancouver. For 15 years he made the trip to Fort St. John, B.C., to call the Fall Feeder Classic. Between running their businesses and raising a family of www.canadiancattlemen.ca

six, the Hurlburts found time to support community efforts and help families in times of need. Ken was elected mayor of Fort Macleod from 1967 to 1971 and as Conservative member of parliament from 1972 to 1979. In the earlier years, he had served the industry as president of the Alberta Auction Markets Association, and three terms as the Canadian representative on the Livestock Marketing Association. Hurlburt isn’t one to take all of the credit for himself. ReNee held down the homefront while he was away and for many years up until the advent of computer systems, she managed the office at the market. Their sons, Brant and Thane, later joined them in business, which included the market as well as their nearby ranch and gravel operation purchased in 1970. There are so many stories that could be told about their time in the auction market business, but one is a particular standout for her. It was during a sale at a time when markets were crying for rail cars to ship cattle on schedule. Ken put in a call to John Diefenbaker in Ottawa in an effort to get cattle cars moved down from the mountains. Knowing Hurlburt’s lively sense of humour, everyone in attendance figured he was just leading them on when Diefenbaker actually returned his call a few minutes later. The cars started rolling as promised. From trains to trucks and paper to computers, the business underwent significant changes as the times demanded. The large auction market that still stands at the junction of Highways 2 and 3 on the outskirts of town was built in 1974 after fire destroyed the original facility. The land auction department, Fort Macleod-Highwood

Auction Company, was established in 1977 and helped break the way for selling land by auction. The Highwood market at High River was newly constructed in the 1980s, while the markets at Pincher Creek and Cranbrook, B.C., were added in 1993. Canadian Satellite Livestock Auction, formed as a partnership between the Fort Macleod Auction Market and Vold Jones & Vold Auction Company, entered the picture in 1993 as well. This method of selling cattle via television broadcasts with the auctioneer accepting phone-in bids had been tried on a limited basis by a U.S. company, but was far more successful when launched by trusted Canadian owners. The Cranbrook market wasn’t rebuilt after it burnt in 1995 and five years later the Highwood and Pincher Creek markets were sold. The Fort Macleod Auction Market was managed by Brant and Thane until 2007, when the family sold the business to longtime associates, Allan Lively, Justin Keeley and Darren Shaw, who now own and operate the Fort Macleod and Highwood markets under the company name of Southern Alberta Livestock Exchange. The Hurlburt family still owns and operates Hurlburt Ranch and the adjoining gravel yard, with Brant and Thane as managing partners. The Hurlburts remain in Fort Macleod where they have resided since 1963. Since retiring from the market office, ReNee has gained an appreciation for computer technology as a way to keep in touch with their many friends and family, which has grown to include 20 grandchildren and 23 great-grandchildren. C — Debbie Furber

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what you like about the magazine, and what you don’t like. There’s also some space for you to tell us what you would like to see in future issues. ClIp And enClose your mAIlIng lABel. each month, we will draw one name from all the surveys sent in and send that person a Cattlemen cap. It could be you!

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Cattlemen / August 2012 33

Auction Market SPECIAL

GATTEY WINS LMAC AUCTIONEERING CHAMPIONSHIP

J

ustin Gattey, an auctioneer from Consort, Alta., representing VJV Auction Mart of Ponoka, topped the field to win the 2012 Livestock Markets Association of Canada Auctioneer Championship. Darryl Snider of the Canadian Simmental Association presented him with the championship buckle. Gattey edged out Travis Rogers by one-half point to win the competition in his third attempt. He’s been auctioneering for five years. The competition hosted by Rob and Sharon Bergevin of VJV Foothills Livestock Auction in Stavely, Alta. is an annual highlight of the Livestock Markets Association of Canada (LMAC) annual meeting that was held in Calgary and Stavely earlier this summer. The judges were drawn from five different provinces — Don Raffan of B.C., Steve Primrose of Alberta, Mike Fleury of Saskatchewan, Brad Martin of Manitoba, Emerson Gill of Ontario along with the 2011 Champion Auctioneer, Brennin Jack of Saskatchewan. Dan Skeels, past LMAC, International and World livestock auctioneering champion served as the master of ceremonies, assisted by Chance Martin, another past LMAC champion from Alberta. Other buckle winners were Rob Bergevin for Most Congenial Auctioneer sponsored by the Raffan family and Tyler Slawinski from Manitoba, Rookie of the Year, sponored by Ivomec-Merial Canada. All competitors received jackets donated by Canadian Satellite Auctions, Blair and Nansen Vold and a framed group photo. They also received a Stetson shirt and jeans donated by Roper and Stetson, Mr. Jim Nevada. The top 10 received leather jackets from Roper and Stetson, and VJV Foothills Livestock Auction. Twenty-five auctioneers from four provinces competed in the initial rounds. After the first go-round, 10 were selected to come back and sell five lots. Other finalists were Travis Rogers of Clyde, sponsored by NBI, who was Reserve Champion and awarded the Canadian Charolais Association buckle. The third-place Canadian Angus Association buckle was awarded to Frederick Bodnarus of Meadow Lake Stockyards. Fourth went to Farron Ward of Candiac Auction in Saskatchewan along with a buckle from the Canadian Hereford Association. Rob Bergevin placed fifth and received the Canadian Limousin Association buckle. The remaining four of the top 10 were Ty Rosehill, Patrick Cassidy both from the Olds Auction Mart, Rhett Parks of Whitewood Livestock Sales and Brock Taylor from Melita, Man. During the business meeting Rick Wright, the LMAC representative on the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency board and a member of the Cattle Implementation, Movements, and Cattle Movement Logistics committee updated the members on the establishment of the national traceability system and an assessment study being proposed by the federal government. CCA executive vice-president Dennis Laycraft updated the marketers of the implementation of BIXS, the beef informa-

34 CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012

(L to r): Dan Skeels, Justin Gattey (2012 LMAC Champion Auctioneer) and Chance Martin. tion exchange established by CCA to provide an improved flow of production and marketing information between all sectors of the industry. LMAC members have expressed concerns in the past that this system may morph into an online selling system but Laycraft said that was not the intent and the CCA would do everything in its power to prevent that from happening. Lee Simmons of Livestock Inspection Services reported on the movement document or manifest that is currently being used in Alberta. A similar manifest covering groups of cattle rather than individual animals is being evaluated for use across Canada. Other awards presented at the banquet were the Hall of Fame Award and a special award for an Industry Champion. Ken Hurlburt from Fort Macleod, Alta. joined Ralph Vold and Roy Rutledge in the LMAC Hall of Fame. This award recognizes individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the livestock-marketing industry. Ken was an auctioneer for many years and a member of Parliament for 6-1/2 years. He was also the mayor of Fort Macleod. Steve Primrose, a past chairman of the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency, was recognized for his support of the auction markets and the important part they play in the cattle industry. Primrose owns a buying station but still supports auction marketing. He was given a custom LMAC buckle normally reserved for auctioneering champions and past presidents. C — Deborah Wilson

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

BUILDING TRUST IN CANADIAN BEEF

Young beef producers search for market value Stewardship, food safety and animal care are business drivers on this farm They are a busy young couple. Melissa Hittinger is a large-animal veterinarian, husband Mike is an extension specialist, and they are parents to two busy young children. Together they also run a 100-cow beef operation at Clyde, just north of Edmonton, Alta. It’s a lifestyle and business choice. Both love farming and saw this as an opportunity to produce the product they wanted, in the way they wanted — based on verified production standards. Today Rafter 2M Farms produces “Locally raised natural meats.” The farm has completed an Environmental Farm Plan (EFP) and is registered with the Verified Beef Production (VBP) program. “We are open and proud of our practices in animal husbandry and environmental sustainability,” they say on

Alber ta producers Melissa and Mike Hittinger want to explain practices to consumers, and use the environmental farm plan and VBP to demonstrate their commitment.

their website. “We provide products that have a known history from birth to plate. That way our customers know how their food was raised and what went into it.”

Finding value That vision seems straightforward enough when the herd was started with three heifers back in 1996. But they’ve learned some things as they have grown. Mike identifies some of the most important from a producer point of view. Differentiate yourself. “Margins are slim in commodity beef,” says Mike, “so we look for ways to add value.” Calves are backgrounded and sold directly to feedlots. Some are sold into value chains such as Heritage Angus Beef and some sold directly to consumers. Verified records are critical to those options. Market sustainability. “We state our production practices and values clearly on our website and people are welcome to check us out.” Find people who find value in what you are offering. “With any niche market, you can produce it but if you don’t find the people who find value in it, it won’t make you much money.” Build a reputation. “You get a reputation and your cattle get a reputation. We have had feedlots tell us they like our cattle because they don’t get sick. The extra things we do are particularly important when you are selling private treaty.”

Consumer trust The common ground in programs such as EFP and VBP is consumer trust, says Melissa, who is also an on-farm food safety auditor for hog operations. Here are her observations. System backs trust. “Lots of people in the agriculture business say they do things, but how is a consumer to know? These programs provide proof of action and the ag industry will benefit as support grows.” Think integrated management. The worlds of food safety and environmental sustainability are often separated in education and production circles, and Melissa likes to bring them together in her work. “Nothing happens in a vacuum. You’re not just grazing cattle, you’re managing the environment.” Respect records. “Records aren’t just for the program, they’re for you. They make you a better manager. VBP is very easy to work with on the records side.”

Connect with customers “Once you understand your responsibility doesn’t end when a calf leaves the farm you’ve taken on a bigger view,” says Melissa. “EFP and VBP makes you better versed in talking to people,” adds Mike. “It sure helps to be able to say to customers, ‘Let me show you the processes that are followed — here’s how and here’s why.’”

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The Science of Healthier Animals 12-07-26 11:33

RESEARCH

Getting a grip on genomics

T

he genetic blueprint of all living organisms is recorded in their DNA (“deoxyribonucleic acid”). Genomics is the study of DNA. There’s been a lot of producer interest in and research investment directed towards the use of genomic technologies in the beef and cattle industry, especially from the seedstock selection point of view. For example, if DNA tests could accurately predict the genetic merit of a potential breeding animal (for mature cow size, feed efficiency or tenderness, for example), culling decisions could be made at birth and save the breeder a lot of time, effort and expense. The animal’s genetic blueprint determines how amino acids from the diet are assembled into new proteins. Many of the important parts of animals (like enzymes, hormones, hooves, hair, horns, skin, muscles, ligaments, tendons, internal organs, cartilage, and even parts of the skeleton) are made entirely or mostly from protein. Protein from the diet is digested into 20 or so different amino acids, which are absorbed into the bloodstream and travel to various locations in the body where those 20 amino acids are assembled into new proteins, based on the DNA blueprint’s instructions. The DNA is found in the beef animal’s 30 pairs of chromosomes, which are found in almost all of the cells of the body. The chromosomes are twisted and coiled so tightly that they are too small to see with the naked eye, even though they would probably be 10 feet long (but still invisibly thin) if they were all stretched out to their full length. The DNA resembles a long chain. Each link in this chain is one of four small molecules that are abbreviated by the letters A, T, G and C. The animal’s cellular machinery reads the genetic blueprint three letters at a time (ATC, GTA, CAT, TAG, etc.). Some of the three-letter codes tell the cellular machinery to “start reading the DNA here.” Other codes correspond to specific amino acids, so the order of the three-letter codes in the DNA blueprint corresponds to the order of the amino acids in the protein that will be manufactured. Finally, some codes tell the cellular machinery to “stop reading here.” The DNA sequence from the “start reading” code to the “stop reading” code is called a gene. Some genes correspond to structural proteins (e.g. muscle), some code for hormones (e.g. testosterone), and some code for enzymes (e.g. amylase, which digests starch). A change in the DNA sequence is called a mutation. Some mutations don’t affect the animal. There are 64 three-letter codes and only 20 amino acids, so each amino acid has more than one code. If changing one letter in the code still calls for the same amino acid,

36 CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012

this is called a “silent mutation.” But sometimes the change in the code can have more profound effects for the animal. For example, myostatin is a hormone that tells muscle to stop growing (“myo” means muscle, and “statin” means stop). The myostatin gene is located on Chromosome 2. Researchers have found at least three different mutations that all result in a non-functional myostatin hormone. One mutation simply exchanged a “G” for an “A” and changed the amino acid sequence in the hormone. Another mutation occurred when 11 letters in a row were lost. This resulted in the loss of some amino acids, and changed the order of other amino acids. A third mutation created a “stop reading” code halfway through the gene, so the hormone is too short. In all three of these cases, the myostatin hormone doesn’t work properly, so the signal that normally slows muscle growth is missing. These three different mutations result in the “doublemuscled” appearance of the Piedmontese, Belgian Blue and Marchigiana breeds. The leptin gene is located on Chromosome 4, and codes for a hormone that regulates appetite and fat deposition. Researchers at the universities of Saskatchewan and Alberta have found a number of mutations in the leptin gene that result in measurable differences in backfat depth, lean yield and days to market. The impact of these mutations on marbling is less clear, which suggests that it is possible to select for leaner carcasses without always reducing marbling score. Many traits are influenced by more than one gene. Here’s a simple example. The calpain gene (Chromosome 29) codes for an enzyme that is involved in muscle protein breakdown during post-mortem aging. The calpastatin gene on Chromosome 7 codes for an enzyme that regulates calpain. So mutations in either of these genes can affect tenderness. Genomics technology has a lot of potential for the beef industry. Some real progress has been made, and some reliable DNA tests have been developed. The next column in this series will talk about some of the challenges that need to be overcome before industry can realize the full potential of the technology. The Beef Research Cluster is funded by the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada to advance research and technology transfer supporting the Canadian beef industry’s vision to be recognized as a preferred supplier of healthy, high-quality beef, cattle and genetics. — Reynold Bergen Reynold Bergen is the science director for the Beef Cattle Research Council. A portion of the national checkoff is directed to the BCRC to fund research and development activities to improve the competitiveness and sustainability of Canada’s beef industry.

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here have been a number of positive developments recently that have given Canadian cattle producers plenty to be optimistic about. The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) has been involved in and assisted with the positive outcomes achieved. We’ve had numerous meetings with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada officials, along with Minister Gerry Ritz, to discuss the Growing Forward 2 (GF2) program. Our goal was to ensure that everyone in the department understands the CCA’s key positions on GF2 as well as the minister does. The recent Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food report, Growing Forward 2, emphasized the importance of research and innovation and trade, and its subsequent recommended improvements to business risk management (BRM) programming aligns with what Canadian cattle producers have been asking for. An important victory for Canadian cattle producers occurred on June 29, when the World Trade Organization (WTO) appellate body released its decision regarding mandatory country-of-origin labelling (COOL). The appellate body confirmed the most important part of the WTO dispute panel decision of November 2011 that the U.S. COOL legislation discriminates against Canadian livestock in the U.S. market. This is the result the CCA was seeking. COOL has affected billions of dollars of commerce in cattle and beef products since it was implemented in 2008. Going forward, the CCA will be working with its U.S. counterparts to develop a solution that eliminates the discrimination of Canadian cattle in the U.S. market. The resolution Canada and Mexico are seeking is to allow for beef and pork processed in the U.S. from imported cattle and hogs to be labelled in the same way as meat from U.S.-born animals — through a mandatory, voluntary or a combination of mandatory and voluntary labelling schemes. On the same day as the COOL announcement, the Canada-Jordan Economic Growth and Prosperity Act received royal assent, making the CanadaJordan Free Trade Agreement law. The agreement will see the elimination of tariffs on the majority of Canadian exports including Canadian beef. This has enabled Canada to regain equivalent terms of access that the U.S. beef industry has had in Jordan since 2001. As Canadian beef exporters direct their primary efforts in the Middle East to markets like Saudi Arabia, it is beneficial to have access to the neighbouring Jordan and others. We hope that other markets in the Middle East will soon follow Jordan’s lead and remove prolonged BSE restrictions for Canadian beef. Another significant development occurred when the Government of Canada, in consultation with the CCA, terminated the WTO dispute settlement panel against Korea. The action was taken due to the

38 Cattlemen / August 2012

by Martin Unrau

progress achieved in moving exports of Canadian beef from under-30-month (UTM) cattle to Korea. Korea is an important market; exports of Canadian beef and veal to Korea are anticipated to reach $30 million by 2015. The CCA is calling on both governments to conclude the Canada-Korea free trade agreement (FTA) that began in 2005, but has been on hold since 2008. The CCA will assist the Government of Canada in any way possible to help complete a CanadaKorea FTA and to restore tariff parity between Canadian and U.S. beef in the Korean market. The issue remains the Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (KORUS) implemented on March 15, 2012. Under KORUS, the Korean tariff on U.S. beef imports will decrease by 2.7 percentage points annually until U.S. beef is duty free in 2026. Canadian beef will remain subject to the full 40 per cent tariff unless Canada and Korea also reach an FTA. Progress continued on Canada joining the TransPacific Partnership (TPP). First announced at the G-20 summit in Los Cabos, Mexico, U.S. Trade Representative Ambassador Ron Kirk has since made it official by sending formal letters of notice to John Boehner, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, and to Daniel Inouye, president pro tempore of the U.S. Senate. The letters, sent on behalf of U.S. President Barack Obama, indicate the government’s intention to include Canada in the ongoing negotiations of a TPP agreement. The TPP countries are seeking to conclude a high-ambition, next-generation regional agreement that liberalizes trade and investment and addresses new and traditional trade issues and 21st century challenges. This is very much in line with the CCA’s objectives for the TPP. The TPP negotiations are complementary to the bilateral free trade negotiations recently launched between Canada and Japan. Currently, Japan’s application to join the TPP remains pending but seems likely. In the CCA’s view Japan’s admittance to the TPP is the primary reason for Canada to join. Peru became the latest country to provide full UTM access for Canadian beef and also some partial over-30-month (OTM) access. There are now nearly 70 countries that have either fully or partially re-established access for Canadian beef since closing their borders in 2003. The CCA continues to work to expand market access. Lastly, the United Nations’ food standards body, the Codex Alimentarius Commission, agreed on a set of residue limits for the veterinary drug ractopamine in cattle and pigs. This is an important development for Canada’s cattle industry as it removes any justification for a non-scientific trade irritant that has hindered trade in Canadian beef to key Asian markets like Taiwan and China. The approval of the ractopamine standard is a victory for scientific decision-making at Codex. The CCA congratulates the Canadian Codex delegation for its hard work on this matter. www.canadiancattlemen.ca

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P r i m e

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by Steve Kay

Rebuilding hopes evaporate A North American view of the meat industry. Steve Kay is publisher and editor of Cattle Buyers Weekly

U

.S. producers started the year hopits crop forecast to 12.970 billion bushels with ing they could expand their herds to a 146 bpa yield and forecast prices at $5.40 to take advantage of the growing global $6.40 per bushel. demand for beef. Mother Nature had Comparisons are already being made with other ideas. Areas of cattle country that had 1988, which saw a disastrous decline in corn plentiful rains and lush pasture a year ago are yields. In the last 52 years, 1988 saw the largnow burning up. More than half the U.S. beef est deviation, 29.1 bpa, below trend-line yields. cow herd is now under drought. Even worse, This year’s trend-line yield is 163 bpa. One can extreme heat and lack of rain is shrinking the only pray that yields for the 2012-13 crop don’t growing U.S. corn crop almost every day. fall as much below the trend as they did in 1988. The dramatic deterioration of grass and This would mean a yield of 134 bpa. Analysts grain crops across the U.S. in the past three are currently forecasting yields of 136 to 140 months has stunned the agricultural commubpa, well below last year’s yield of 147 bpa. nity. Few forecast the widespread drought that Lack of rain has caused pasture conditions has battered crops since May. In fact, the first to deteriorate in much of cattle country. USDA few months of the year held on July 16 reported that 62 much promise. Texas and per cent of the continental Oklahoma saw an end to U.S. was in moderate or their historic drought and The implications are worse drought. Fifty-four pasture conditions and per cent of pastures were crops responded well to ominous for the beef in poor or very poor conspring rains. Ideal condidition, compared to 50 per tions throughout the Corn industry.The entire cent a week earlier and 32 Belt led to one of the fast- infrastructure of the per cent the same week last est and earliest-ever plantyear. Again, there was little ings of the new corn crop. U.S. industry will keep in the weather forecasts USDA subsequently forecast that offered any moisture a yield of 166 bushels per shrinking unless it relief. acre (bpa), a record crop of starts raining soon The implications are 14.790 billion bushels and ominous for the beef indusan average price of $4.60 try. Any thought of net per bushel. Given that the average price of heifer retention and the start of herd rebuilding the 2011-12 crop might be $6, such a decline has dried up. Even before the drought began to would have brought much-needed relief to catspread, the national herd was not expected to tle feeders. start growing until 2015 at the earliest. Now These prospects have evaporated, like the any growth appears to have been put back moisture through much of the central U.S. By another year. This will put more pressure on a early July, drought had become this year’s No. cattle-feeding sector that is already struggling 1 story for U.S. agriculture and for the beef with significant overcapacity and deeply negaindustry. Pasture conditions were deteriorattive margins due to high feeder cattle and corn ing, forcing more young cattle into feedlots prices, and on the packing sector, which suffers and causing more beef cows to be culled than from overcapacity as well. The entire infraexpected. Producers were receiving $150 to structure of the U.S. industry will keep shrink$200 less for their cattle than they might have ing unless it starts raining soon. got two months ago. The condition of the corn crop was deteCattle Buyers Weekly covers the North American riorating as well. Hot, dry weather persisted meat and livestock industry. For subscription inforthrough the crop’s critical pollination stage and mation, contact Steve Kay at P.O. Box 2533, Petaluma, Calif. 94953, or at 707-765-1725, or go to it appears the crop suffered permanent damage www.cattlebuyersweekly.com. during pollination. USDA on July 11 slashed

40 Cattlemen / August 2012

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STRAIGHT FROM THE HIP

The Red Revolution

T

he surge in beef production, consumption and export of beef from India is internally termed “the red revolution.” It is a classic and important example of how quickly the world as we know it can change. The stereotypical India is often thought of by Canadians as a poor country of vegetarians who consider the cow as holy. In reality this diverse country with a population of 2.2B is pressuring Australia for top spot as the world’s largest beef exporter. How is it that a country with a past history of little domestic beef production and a complete lack of infrastructure expects to export 1.5 million tons of beef this year? It all goes back to key events in the late 1980s when the government recognized that it would need to allow for enabling legislation and let industry lead with initiatives that would grow actual beef production. Beef in India is primarily buffalo or a composite breed and for good reason. Domestic buffalo is the bovine of choice for milk production because of the high fat content, disease resistance and a high feed conversion. When the milk industry was liberalized in 1991 as part of the Economic Reform Program, milk buffalo were rolled into domestic beef production. This followed initiatives in the meat industry that were well underway. The meat producers in India had asked for easement on the restrictions and duties on the importation of feed and feed additives to grow their industry. This allowed the fed-cattle industry to grow and improve efficiencies. One of the historical issues facing Indian agriculture was the premature slaughter of cattle. Although the infrastructure in India remains a weak point it has improved as has cold storage and slaughter integration. There are still over 29,000 cattle abattoirs in India today of which 4,000 are registered and 20 are state of the art. For any industry to grow there needs to be access to affordable credit and changes in agricultural lending allowed for livestock enterprises to flourish. This was complimented by the growing domestic demand for beef in India. Today about 30 per cent of the population are meat eaters and another 30 per cent are vegetarian. The remaining 40 per cent eat enough beef to make a difference in domestic demand. The growing need for beef in emerging economies also keeps beef export demand high and India strives to address WTO requirements. As in all countries there must be some assurance of food safety and increased disease surveillance and India’s commitment to this has increased export potential. Massive increases in domestic livestock production do not evolve without challenges. As the beef side of India grows, there are environmental, disease and social issues that surface. The “red revolution” has torn working buffalo from small rural holdings leaving the chil-

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dren to do the heavy work as meat prices entice farmers to sell working stock. With a cattle population of 277 million head living in very close proximity to so many people, the emergence of disease is a constant challenge from production through to retail and export. India is working hard on that front to create disease-free zones. And although increased economic activity and trade is of benefit to India, the domestic press is attacking the increase in obesity within India and pointing the finger directly at beef consumption. This is ironic in a country that also houses one of the largest populations of the world’s poor and hungry and still considers the cow as holy. The cow population is much greater than the buffalo population. Buffalo is not cow. The allowance of foreign investment in India has resulted in massive supermarket growth but the reality is that there are currently 12 million food retail outlets in India. India cannot outgrow the deep cultural practices that drive domestic markets. Many Indians prefer the outdoor market where they buy from “wet” stalls — that is fresh cut and hanging on display or fresh hanging and the vendor cuts off a slice. Although all of these accomplishments within Indian beef cattle production are commendable the most influential initiative may have been the strengthening of the interface between the private and the public sector and a strong long-term export plan. India is clearly focused on developing economies knowing full well that consumption in developed economies is failing. They clearly understand what they are up against and yet are poised in this calendar year to be the world leader in beef exports. And their target markets mirror many of the major exporters such as Australia and Canada with the added advantage of less cost. Fascinating would be a good word to describe the “red revolution” but there is more to this story. India itself is one of the world’s strongest emerging economies with a young population. While developed economies face aging populations and decreased food retail activity, India is not only an exporter but a key player in its own game. And while it is true that internal inflation and the world financial crisis has slowed the overall economy, India’s GDP is still expected for this year to be up 6.3 per cent . How the story will end is yet to be known. I will be in India this September to look at agricultural production systems and review agricultural policy. Red revolution or just another shade of pink? Stay tuned for the rest of the story. — Brenda Schoepp Brenda Schoepp is a market analyst and the owner and author of BEEFLINK, a national beef cattle market newsletter. A professional speaker and industry market and research consultant, she ranches near Rimbey, Alta. Contact her at [email protected] or visit www.brendaschoepp. com. All rights reserved 2012.

CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012 41

NEWS ROUNDUP FORAGE A FORAGE NETWORK FOR SASKATCHEWAN Saskatchewan Forage Council president Aaron Ivey brought some good news to the SFC annual meeting earlier this summer with the announcement that funding is finally in place to begin building a Forage Network for Saskatchewan. With support from the Saskatchewan Canadian Agricultural Adaptation Program the search is on for a network project co-ordinator as a first step to add some muscle to the forage industry within the province. The network model developed in Alberta is designed to gain a stronger voice with industry and government through building partnerships in the forage community. The concept has evolved over the past year following a discussion at the 2011 SFC annual meeting over the lack of forage research in Saskatchewan and across Canada. “We found that co-ordination of the industry is not that easy because forage is a fractured industry with many

Aaron Ivey 42 CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012

stakeholders,” says Ivey. “A network model would bring producers, industry, researchers, ideas and money together.” The network will not replace the SFC, which was founded in 1988 to promote and advance the province’s forage industry through research and extension. As SFC executive director Janice Bruynooghe points out, everything the council does is project based in partnership with other forage and livestock stakeholders. Last year’s activities included the continuation of their work with a long list of supporters on invasive plant species management strategies, an evaluation of Roundup Ready alfalfa in co-operation with the Canadian Forage and Grassland Association (CFGA) and hosting the CFGA’s second annual meeting in Saskatoon. Since the inception of the province’s ADOPT (Agriculture Demonstration of Practices and Technology) program in 2009, the SFC has received funding for and managed 14 projects, nine are still in progress. A new Agricultural Development Fund trace minerals project to evaluate the mineral status of Saskatchewan pastures got underway this April. As part of its extension efforts the SFC publishes the FORAGE AND LIVESTOCK ENEWS, the SASKATCHEWAN HAY AND PASTURE REPORT , maintains a website devoted to forage news and information and contributes to the provincial LIVESTOCK AND FORAGE GAZETTE. It also assists in organizing the annual Saskatchewan Pasture School and offers a Forage Innovation Award to draw attention to the work of forage scientists and extension workers. This year’s winner is Chris Nykoluk, the recently retired range management specialist with Agriculture and AgriFood Canada’s agriculture environment service branch in Regina. Ivey was re-elected president and Nancy Johns of Watrous remains vice-president. Past president Leam Craig of Biggar and Clayton Myhre of Nipawin stepped off the board, while Neil McLeod of Rosetown is a new director. Other board members include Bruce Coulman and Fran Walley from the University of Saskatchewan, Alan Iwaasa from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s research station at Swift Current, Dave Kerr of Lashburn, Kelly Williamson of Pambrun, Trevor Plews with Ducks Unlimited

Canada at Yorkton, Ryan Sommerfeld of Medstead, Charlotte Ward with the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture (SMA) at Yorkton and Michel Tremblay as an ex officio member on behalf of the SMA. For more information, contact the SFC at 306-867-8126, or through the website at www.saskforage.ca.

POLITICS LAND USE ISSUES STILL TOP THE B.C. AGENDA Ever-present land stewardship issues, reviews of important provincial legislation, and a review of producerfunded consumer awareness programs were front and centre at the British Columbia Cattlemen’s Association’s (BCCA) annual meeting at Fort St. John in June. Newly elected president Dave Haywood-Farmer says the improvement in cattle prices once again had members enthusiastic about being in the cattle business. He’s hoping it signals a turning point for the province’s beef industry, which has seen cattle numbers slip by nearly half since the high in 2005. Haywood-Farmer, who succeeds Judy Guichon as president, runs an Angus-Hereford herd with his cousin near Savona, 30 miles west of Kamloops.

STAMPEDE

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As he looks to the future he sees succession as a growing issue for the industry. In the present economic climate young people have a hard time raising the capital to buy in and allowing the older generation to retire comfortably. Governance is another priority for the BCCA and the association is currently evaluating its structure to be sure it efficiently meets the needs of producers. Then, of course, there’s land stewardship. “Land use issues are always in front of cattlemen here because there are so many shared users in our province. It’s always a matter of cattlemen keeping a step ahead,” he explains. More than half of the resolutions passed at the meeting dealt with land stewardship. The horrendous destruction of

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forests by the mountain pine beetle continues to haunt the province. The loss of natural barriers because of deadfall and logging is an issue for some ranchers, but the overarching concern is long-term forage availability on Crown land. Normally, logging companies are required to follow a scheduled pattern to keep reforested areas in differing stages of succession. The forage supply gradually dwindles as the stands mature and the tree canopies close. Instead large expanses are now being reforested in short order, which will lead to a critical shortage of forage 10 to 15 years down the road when the canopies of all of the new plantings close up around the same time.  The BCCA is urging the province to incorporate forages  into its reforestation plans. This would be of mutual

benefit to cattlemen and loggers, says Haywood-Farmer as strategically planted forage stands would draw cattle and wildlife away from sensitive areas. Several resolutions called for a concerted effort by all Crown land users to control noxious weeds and invasive plants. The cattlemen want the province to accept responsibility for weed control on public lands and do everything possible to assist the ranching community in the task, including the purchase of the herbicides and creating an abbreviated pesticide applicator’s licence that would allow ranchers to control weeds on their own leased range.  Wolf predation continues to escalate, and producers directed the BCCA Continued on page 44

Cattlemen / August 2012 43

NEWS ROUNDUP Continued from page 43

to press the government to proactively reduce wolf populations in problem areas, and introduce a shared insurance plan where producers could purchase coverage for predator losses. Someone must have been listening. During the meeting the province announced $50,000 in funding over the next five years for the B.C. Trappers Association to remove problem predators. The rewrite of the provincial Water



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Act remains a high priority, while the current update to the Agriculture Waste Control Regulations comes with its own set of issues, specifically in dealing with the storage of wastes. The cattlemen are encouraging the province to use the environmental farm plan as a baseline rather than regulations. Another resolution sought mustering fees from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency when herds must be tested for reportable diseases, in the belief that individual producers should not be asked to bear the cost when all of society benefits from checking the spread of disease.

first gathered from a literature review and consultations with every sector of the Alberta beef industry from cow-calf producers to exporters and retailers, consumers, government, technology providers and insurers. The benefits put forward were identified as consumer protection, market access, improved information flow throughout the beef value chain, company risk mitigation, market differentiation, production management, productivity enhancement, perceptions, margins and liability. MCG chose seven benefits that came to the top for each sector and subjectively ranked their importance on a five-point scale based on impressions gleaned during the consultations. Cow-calf producers, backgrounders, and auction markets saw very little benefit from traceability. Feedlots and primary and secondary processors view almost all of these benefits as important. Feedlots downplayed the liability benefit, while processors felt traceability will have little impact on margins.

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Exporters gave a rating of high importance to every benefit, except margins. Governments and associations rated consumer protection the highest level of importance. Government also gave high ratings on perception and liability. Both were middle of the road on all of the other benefits. Consumers generally rated consumer protection and perception as very important benefits for traceability, with margins being a minor benefit and no opinion either way on the other. The general conclusions were that a base system is required for public good and it provides market reassurances; customer-relevant programs will be the driver and traceability will be a part of them, not a leading one; liability and risk associated with incidents will require participation; and profitability and market positioning will drive the successful implementation of traceability. In a value chain, the attributes of traceability are more defined within each link and are generally related to facilitating production and processing systems that improve market access and position. Consumers look to traceability to provide assurance of food safety or product claims so they can put their trust in the system, the brand and retailer and source verification. Competition, branding, differentiation, program buying and risk are the trends in the retail, food-service and export markets that will determine the benefits of traceability in future. The dominant consumer trend is the growing demand for innovative, convenient, less-processed food with health benefits that comes in an environmentally friendly package with a story attached. The authors conclude the importance of traceability will only increase as branded beef continues to gain more space in the retail fresh meat case. The economic benefit of traceability is tied to any increase it provides in the value of branded beef sales. Canadian retail data suggests 51 per cent of beef is currently branded and claim-related brands will grow by 10 per cent per year for the next five years. MCG predicts the value of consumer-relevant brand sales in Canadian retail stores will increase from $500 million today to nearly $1.75 billion by 2022. Food-service beef brand sales will increase from approximately $200 million to more than $600 million, and export branded beef sales will increase from $350 million to nearly a billion dollars. The critical factors for success with traceability in Canadian beef include:

• A base structure to address consumer protection and supplier liability. • The ability to verify linkages throughout the value chain in real time. • Development of consumer-relevant brands that support relevant production claims. • Industry leadership to mesh the overall good for the industry with specific industry realities and financial requirements. An overview of the study was first presented by Kerry Wright of MCG at the Alberta Beef Producers’ semi-annual meeting in Edmonton. Visit www.alma.alberta.ca for more information. C

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CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012 45

purely purebred Suggestions are always welcome. My phone number is 403-325-1695 Email:

is still raising polled Hereford cattle in central Alberta. Several people stopped me to tell me that one was too easy!

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Deborah WILSON

◆ Well, I have been reprimanded in

the most comical ways after referring to the animal with Wayne Burgess, in the Old-Timer/Guess Who picture, in the May issue, as a heifer. You would think I would have noticed the ring in the nose, which would indicate that it was probably a bull. Thanks to the eagle eyes who pointed this out to me. In auctioneering lingo “Good Eye!” Jamie Rea from Marengo, Sask., identified Wayne. Sharon Forsyth of Ont., also identified Wayne, but she should have been able to as Wayne is her brother. She came within three years of the correct year. Brent Stewart identified all the individuals in the last two issues but still hasn’t learned to email. Kelsey sent in his comments. (I imagine he will be hunting me down in the barns at Agribition.) Brent, you have a “Good Eye” but you really need to get Kelsey and Dale to teach you to email.

◆ The June picture featured Hoss Hammer (l), a well-known agricultural radio announcer in central Alberta from the ’70s to the mid-’90s, and Craig Flewelling (r), who, with his son, 46 Cattlemen / August 2012

◆ This month’s picture was sent to me from Saskatchewan, and that is the only hint. Can you identify either gentleman, the year or the event? Stay tuned for the September issue as I have a terrific picture for that issue. ◆ Well-known Alberta cattle hoof

trimmer, Darwin Wideman is still slowly recovering from serious injuries inflicted by a bull last February. Best wishes go out to Darwin, and let this be a lesson to be extremely careful when handling bulls. Darwin had a lifetime of experience behind him, so you never know what might happen.

◆ Anyone who doesn’t think the Her-

eford breed is alive and thriving in Canada was proved wrong July 13-18 as the Canadian Hereford Association hosted the 16th World Hereford Conference in Calgary and Olds, Alta. With 550 head of Hereford cattle on display, both purebred and commercial, as well as outstanding Junior and Open shows, attendees had ample opportunity to see what the Hereford breed has to offer in both polled and horned cattle. I will follow up with more details in the next issue. The Canadian Hereford Association was formed in 1890 with the primary objectives of preserving the purity of Hereford cattle, promoting the interests of the importers and breeders of such animals, and collecting, verifying, preserving and publishing the pedigrees of said cattle and other useful Hereford information. Today there are an estimated 120,000 purebred Hereford females in production in Canada, 300,000 to 350,000 straightbred Hereford females (10 per cent of the beef cow herd), and an estimated 30 per cent or more of the cow herd carries Hereford breeding. The Canadian Hereford Association has

◆ John Nostadt, of Maidstone, Ont., won the 30th annual UFA Steer Classic during the Calgary Stampede with his 1,324-pound crossbred Angus/Simmental/Maine Anjou steer. Nostadt and his business partner, Martin Koyle won $11,000 — $10,000 from UFA for grand champion honours, plus $1,000 for winning the Open class.

◆ Sixteen-year-old Dakota Townsend

of Sylvan Lake, Alta., won $4,000 from Merck Animal Health when her 1,376-pound Hereford steer was named overall reserve champion, plus $10,000 for winning the Hereford class. The Canadian Hereford Association put up the extra money in honour of the 16th World Hereford Conference being held in Canada — and southern Alberta — for the first time since 1976.

◆ The Calgary Stampede’s International Youth Livestock program and its sponsors — Tervita, Bayer CropScience, ConocoPhillips, Enbridge, WA Ranches, the Alberta 4-H Foundation, Ted and Enid Jansen, and the Calgary Stampede Foundation — presented their annual array of post-secondary scholarships to future leaders of agriculture. The number of recipients (55) and total scholarship dollars ($65,000) are the most in program history. The gifts of belt buckles and jackets for all scholarship winners brings this year’s expenditure to just over $80,000 — nearly double the outlay in 2011. The scholarships were announced at the Summer Synergy show in Calgary and Olds where 350 competitors from across Western Canada presented 600 head of livestock. www.canadiancattlemen.ca

◆ Canadian Angus Association mem-

bers gathered in Lethbridge June 14-16 for the 2012 Canadian Angus National Convention. The board of directors affirmed Gary Latimer as president of 2012-13. Gary and his wife Jacci, along with their son Richard and his wife Kelly, own and operate Remitall Farms of Olds, Alta. Kevin Blair of Lanigan, Sask., was named president elect for next year. The association has a positive surplus over expenditures for the second year in a row due to increased memberships, registrations, transfers and higher fees. Angus tag sales are also up while costs are down due to a reduction in consulting services and the termination of the Herdmaster contract.

◆ The Canadian Limousin Association held its 43rd annual meeting last month in Olds, Alta. Bill Campbell from Minto, Man., was re-elected president for a second year and Brian Lee of Janetville, Ont., was elected vicepresident. Terry Hepper, Zehner, Sask., is the new treasurer. New to the board are Tim Andrew of Youngstown, Alta., and Luc Forcier from Yamaska, Que.,

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◆ The sixth annual Garth Sweet Simmental Foundation Auction will be held in conjunction with the CSA annual meeting August 23-25 in Truro, Nova Scotia. The feature lot, Lot #1 Bred Heifer — BAR 5 FF PEONA 1211Y (CO 1211Y, Reg# 746226) was donated by Gibbons Farms, Vaughn and Cindy Gibbons, Stevensville, Ont. Anyone with items to donate should contact Kara Enright (613) 478-3404, Emily Grey (819) 835-0284 or Margo Cartwright (403) 250-5255. ◆ The fifth annual T Bar Invitational golf tournament was the most successful yet, raising over $42,000 for eight national junior breed associations, representing 2,041 members. A portion will be donated to the Canadian Western Agribition Junior Beef Extreme. See www.tbarinvitational.com for details. ◆ In June the RCMP were called out west of Edmonton to investigate the shooting of five cattle and a horse.

Wade Thordarson discovered two of the animals, a purebred Angus cow and calf belonging to his 13-year-old daughter, Kassidy, who was hoping to show them at their local 4-H show. Brad and Nicole Yoder of Cinder Angus offered Kassidy a replacemen​t bred heifer to show this year.

◆ Phil and Catherine Brown and

daughter Cayley closed down their purebred cattle consulting business in Ontario last month to take on the management of Copper Creek Ranch in Princeton, B.C. The ranch runs a few hundred purebred Herefords and Hereford-influence commercial cows. Cayley, a member of the Canadian Junior Hereford Association, will transport her small herd to B.C. and Catherine has taken on the role of adult adviser to the B.C. Junior Hereford Association. Catherine is a longtime writer for Ontario Farmer Publications, a contributing editor to the Canadian Hereford Digest magazine and an occasional contributor to Continued on page 48

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1-888-848-6196 Cattlemen / August 2012 47

Continued from page 47

our magazine. She will continue writing from B.C., but on a smaller scale.

◆ Stacey Domolewski of Taber, Alta.,

was selected as the Robert C. McHaffie Junior Ambassador for the Canadian Angus As s o c ia t io n i n 2012-13. A junior ambassador is selected each year to represent the CAA at events across the country. Stacey Domolewski Stacey owns her own small Red Angus purebred herd and is an active member of the familyrun C.D. Land and Cattle Company at Taber, Alta. She is entering her fourth year of animal science toward a degree in agriculture at the University of Saskatchewan this fall.

◆ Chad Lorenz of Lorenz Angus is

the first recipient of the Dick Turner Scholarship awarded by Canadian Angus Association in memory of the

sales

12th Annual Saskatoon Gelbvieh Bull & Female Sale March 23, 2012, Saskatoon, Sask. 34 Registered Gelbvieh bulls, av. $5,357 18 Registered Gelbvieh open heifers, av. $1,972 V&V Farms, Redcliff, Alta. bought the high-selling bull — Fir River BIG’N’RICH 438Y for $14,000.

pion 1984) who sired champions. His progeny have been Reserve Champions, Grand Champions, and Calf World Champions at major western Canadian shows. The success of his offspring has made him the highest-rated bull in the Banner Of Show Sires (BOSS, 19842011) which keeps track of Charolais animals and their progeny that win in the show ring. Roxy’s Jack Dempsey 63R is a Charolais bull to remember and a great example of the attributes of the breed: fast growth rate, excellent muscle development, and superior meat quality with a high percentage of salable cuts.

longtime  editor of the A berdeen Angus News. Chad is vice-president of the Alberta Junior Angus Association and director of the Canadian Junior Angus Association. He is studying Chad Lorenz animal science at Lakeland College in Vermilion and is a member of their judging team. This year he will be on the purebred beef team and president of the Stockman’s Club.

◆ Canadian Cattle Genome Project —

Bull of the Month. The Canadian Cattle Genome Project is focused on bringing cost effective genomics (DNA) tools to Canada’s beef producers to improve producer profitability and efficiencies in beef production. We are gathering samples from animals that have the greatest genetic influence on the Canadian cattle herd for DNA sequencing and genotyping. Over the next few months we will highlight bulls included in the project that helped establish their respective breeds in Canada. This month’s profile is a Charolais bull named “Roxy’s Jack Dempsey 63R.” Roxy’s Jack Dempsey 63R heavily influenced the current generation (200611) of registered Charolais animals. Sired by S CCC Elevations Knockout and D Roxy Caid 35J and born in 1983 he was a champion (Agribition Grand Cham-

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The markets

Market Summary debbie mcmillin Fed Cattle Fed prices have been disappointing relative to what was expected of this summer market and current breakeven levels. Cattle placed on feed under contract or hedged were profitable but those left in the cash market were sold at a loss. Prices were higher than in recent years but the higher break-evens ate up the profit. Following a spring high of $116.54 Alberta fed steers appeared to have made a summer low at $108.36 at the start of July in response to some aggressive marketing by feedlots. By the third week of July the numbers were down and prices back to $110.43, which was $6.46 better than last year and $22.55 per cwt ahead of 2010. Front-end supplies are manageable but carcass weights by mid-July climbed 20 pounds over the year before to 861 pounds; average weights for 2012 are running 872 pounds, 35 more than 2011. On July 1 Alberta and Saskatche-

Deb’s Outlook

wan finishing lots held 746,882 head, seven per cent fewer than last year and the smallest July 1 inventory since they started keeping records in 2000. June placements were down one per cent at 65,797 head — 29 per cent under the five-year average. Federal steer slaughter was down three per cent at 729, 804 head and heifers the same percentage at 520,190. Fed-cattle exports to July 7 totalled 208,023 head, down five per cent on the year.

Feeder Cattle Feeder markets in July were sideswiped by USDA’s predicted 12 per cent drop in the drought-ravished corn crop. Despite the volatility south of the border and uncertainty over feed costs the Canadian feeder market remained relatively stable for much of the summer. Alberta 550 steers enjoyed a small rally at the end of June to make $176.50 before slipping to $169 by the third week of July. That’s up from $152 last year. The 850 steers dropped from $141.50 to $135.75 over the same stretch. As we head into the yearling market prices are expected to improve. Even in years with high barley prices the rising grass yearling market generally holds true. The basis generally narrows through August. In the third week of July it was -4.79 compared to -3.09 in 2011. Canadian dollar and swap costs to place feeder cattle.

Fed Cattle

Feeder Cattle

Near term, larger carcass weights, slower beef movement and smaller slaughter numbers may make it difficult to advance cash markets significantly. However Canadian feedlots are fairly current with their inventories giving sellers an advantage. From a demand standpoint, this summer’s heat slowed the movement of beef across North America but fed prices should pick up as we move into cooler fall weather. Limiting factors to watch for include rising fuel and feed costs, a stronger

The dynamics in the feeder market were changing constantly over the past few weeks. Heading into fall it will be a case of tight supplies versus input costs pulling on prices. The smaller beef herd remains a bullish factor that should lead to a competitive fall market. However as harvest gets underway everyone will be focused on crop conditions and the resulting costs of gain. Canadian producers also need to factor in the dollar. A lower dollar may attract U.S. feedlots if their feed costs don’t

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

Feeder exports to July 7 total 99,774 head, up 89 per cent from last year. In the first week of July, however, feeders shipments south were just 20 per cent of the weekly average for this year. Granted it was a short week, but this was the smallest week of the year for exports, reflecting the current pressure on the U.S. feeder market.

Non-Fed Cattle Cows in the first half of 2012 averaged $5 per cwt better than a year ago. The summer market peaked briefly at $85.90 but could only maintain an average over $85 for two weeks before slipping back to $78.75 in the third week of July. High trim prices, small cow numbers and a reduced supply of lean textured beef in the U.S. supported Canadian cow prices and raised non-NAFTA imports. Looking back D1,2 cows averaged $71.15 last year and $59.56 in 2010. Canadian cow slaughter is down two per cent at 79,158 head. Butcher bulls in midJuly averaged $97.43 per cwt. Export shipments were up eight per cent at 22,153 head.

— Debbie McMillin

Debbie McMillin is a market analyst who ranches at Hanna, Alta.

More markets➤ go too high. The recent World Trade Organization ruling on country-oforigin labelling could also create added U.S. interest.

Non-Fed Cattle As producers start weaning calves the supply of cull cows will increase which typically pressures prices. But look for strong trim prices to support cow prices moving forward. While Canadian cow prices have been strong the U.S. market has outpaced us, which puts an export floor on the non-fed market. In summary, prices will decline seasonally but not as much as usual during the fall run. Cattlemen / august 2012 49

Break-even Prices on A-Grade Steers 130

ALBERTA

170

110

90 80

Steer Calves (500-600 lb.)

180

120

100

Market Prices

190

160

western Market Summary

150 140

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

130

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

95

145

ONTARIO

135

D1,2 Cows

85

125

75

115

65

105

55

95 85 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

2012

Canfax weighted average price on A-Grade steers

45

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

Ontario 2011 Market Ontario prices based on a 50/50 east/west mix Summary O ntario

2012

2011

A lberta

Break-even price

2012

for steers on date sold

2012-13

2011

Kevin Grier2011

Market Summary (to July 9)

July 2012 prices* Alber ta Yearling steers (850 lb.)............... $141.13/cwt Barley................................................. 5.40/bu. Barley silage..................................... 67.50/ton Cost of gain (feed)........................... 72.33/cwt Cost of gain (all costs)..................... 97.61/cwt Fed steers...................................... 110.12/cwt Break-even (November 2012)......... 125.53/cwt Ontario Yearling steers (850 lb.)............... $143.20/cwt Corn silage....................................... 56.08/ton Grain corn........................................... 6.76/bu. Cost of gain (feed)......................... 101.00/cwt Cost of gain (all costs)................... 126.79/cwt Fed steers...................................... 115.60/cwt Break-even (January 2013)............ 136.41/cwt *Mid-month to mid-month prices Breakevens East: end wt 1,450, 183 days West end wt 1,325 lb., 125 days

50 Cattlemen / august 2012

2012 Total Canadian federally inspected slaughter............. 1,454,906 Average steer carcass weight............................................ 873 lb. Total U.S. slaughter.................................................... 17,293,000

2011 1,491,226 836 lb. 18,096,000

Trade Summary EXPORTS 2012 Fed cattle to U.S. (to June 30)....................................... 204,184 Feeder cattle and calves to U.S. (to June 30).................. 99,013 Dressed beef to U.S. (to May)............................... 227.03 mil.lbs Total dressed beef (to May).................................. 294.37 mil.lbs

2011 215,260 51,269 236.66 mil.lbs 297.05 mil.lbs

IMPORTS 2012 Slaughter cattle from U.S. (to May) .......................................... 0 *Dressed beef from U.S. (to May)........................ 132.26 mil.lbs *Dressed beef from Australia (to May)..................... 11.90 mil.lbs *Dressed beef from New Zealand (to May)................ 25.29 mil.lbs *Dressed beef from Uruguay (to May)................... 11.35 mil.lbs

2011 0 131.94 mil.lbs 7.29 mil.lbs 26.82 mil.lbs 7.60 mil.lbs

Canadian Grades (to July 14) % of A grades AAA AA A Prime Total EAST WEST

+59% 19.7 27.0 1.6 0.2 48.5 Total graded 310,579 1,135,545

Yield –53% Total 12.7 55.9 2.8 39.6 0.0 1.7 0.6 1.2 16.1 Total A grade 98.4% Total ungraded % carcass basis 61,864 62.7% 88 82.0%

54-58% 23.5 9.8 0.1 0.4 33.8

Only federally inspected plants

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

market talk with Gerald Klassen

Feed grain complex changes

I

n the previous issue, I was quite bearish on barley and on record and the corn crop has suffered in the northern corn prices as the North American crops were seeded Corn Belt of Illinois and Ohio and parts of Nebraska in a timely fashion under favourable conditions. and Iowa. The 2011 average yield was 146.7 bushels However, there have been significant changes in the per acre but analysts feel the 2012 yield will come in the feed grain complex over the past couple months. First, range of 135 to 140 bushels per acre. The corn market Canadian barley acres are down from earlier expectais also functioning to ration demand. There is a lot of tions. Secondly, a large portion of the U.S. Corn Belt winter wheat moving into feed channels but the adverse has experienced drought-like conditions causing corn conditions in Russia will result in a sharp increase in U.S. futures to skyrocket. The Black Sea region has also sufwheat exports. The 2012-13 U.S. corn carry-out is profered adverse growing conditions resulting in stronger jected to drop under one billion bushels down to pipeline barley prices on the world market. All these factors have stocks. There is potential for new historical highs in the resulted in a sharply tighter world fundamental structure corn and barley markets over the next six months. and it appears that feed grain prices will stay firm for the Drought-like conditions are having an adverse effect 2012-13 crop year. on the cattle market. Feeder prices in the U.S. have Statistics Canada estimated barley acres at 7.4 mildropped sharply and cow-calf producers in the drier lion; while this is up from the 2011 seeded area of 6.5 regions are liquidating high-quality heifers and cows. million, it is down from earlier estimates that ranged Earlier in the year, analysts were expecting the catfrom 7.8 million to 8.5 million. tle herd to expand but this will Growing conditions have been likely be delayed for one or two quite favorable in Western Canyears. At the same time, fed catThe 2012-13. U.S. corn ada and using a normal yield tle prices have drifted lower and projection, Canadian barley profeeding margins are moving into carry-out is projected to duction will likely finish near 8.5 red ink. Canadian feeder prices million tonnes compared to 7.8 have held up fairly well but will drop under one billion million last year. eventually come in line with the bushels down to pipeline Barley prices on the world U.S. market. market have surged due to lower When looking at past drought stocks. There is potential barley and wheat production in years, the feed grain complex Ukraine and Russia. Offers from tends to make highs in the fall for new historical highs in the Black Sea region have dried period. The market then slightly the corn and barley markets softens when the South American up and major barley importers have been caught off guard with harvest comes on stream during over the next six months the rising prices. I’m forecastthe late winter and fall period. ing a Canadian export program In the meantime, cattle producof 1.5 million mt, which will be ers have to factor in a worstmostly feed barley. At this time, feed demand is stronger case scenario that corn prices could reach over $10 per than malt which has caused the malt premium over feed bushel. This will cause a large uncertainty in the feeder barley to erode. cattle market because the deferred live cattle futures The function of the Canadian barley market is to have softened. Large placements in the summer and fall ration demand. Domestic feed prices need to trade at a period, due to herd liquidation will cause beef produclarge premium to world values to temper offshore movetion to come in larger than earlier projections for the ment. The Canadian barley carry-out is projected to dip fourth quarter of 2012 and first quarter of 2013. It is to 1.0 million mt, which is down from the 10-year averprudent to have a risk management program in place age of 2.4 million mt. Therefore, prices are expected to as we have all seen how conditions can change within a remain at historical highs for the 2012-13 crop year. 30-day window. The USDA estimated corn acres at 96.4 million which is up from the 2011 acreage of 91.9 million. Despite the Gerald Klassen analyzes markets in Winnipeg and also maintains large acreage, yield will likely come in below year-ago an interest in the family feedlot in southern Alberta. He can be levels. June was one of the driest and warmest months reached at [email protected] or 204-287-8268. www.canadiancattlemen.ca

Cattlemen / august 2012 51

SALES AND EVENTS EVENTS August

14-17—Canadian Cattlemen’s Association Semi-annual Meeting, Deerfoot Inn and Casino, Calgary, Alta. 15—Beef 2012 — International Livestock Congress, Deerfoot Inn and Casino, Calgary, Alta. 20—Cattlewomen for the Cure Golf Tournament, Cottonwood Coulee, Medicine Hat, Alta., www.cattlewomenforthecure.com 23-24—Young Canadian Simmentalers National Classic Events and Show, Turo, Nova Scotia 23-25—Canadian Simmental Association AGM, Best Western Glengarry Hotel, Truro, Nova Scotia 23-25—Maritime Classic Show, Nova Scotia Provincial Exhibition, Truro, Nova Scotia

September

11-13—Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show, Canada’s Outdoor Park, Woodstock, Ont.

19—Canada Beef Annual General Meeting and Forum, Sheraton Cavalier, Calgary, Alta. 19-23—Lindsay Exhibition Fall Fair, Lindsay Exhibition, Lindsay, Ont.

November

1-3—34th Stockade Roundup, Lloydminster Exhibition, Lloydminster, Alta. 1-4—Manitoba Livestock Expo, Keystone Centre, Brandon, Man. 2-11—Royal Winter Fair, Direct Energy Centre, Toronto, Ont. 3-11—Canadian Finals Rodeo, Expo Centre, Edmonton, Alta., www.canadianfinalsrodeo.com 5-10—Farmfair International, Rexall Place, Edmonton, Alta., www.farmfair.ca 7-10—Agri-trade, Westerner Park, Red Deer, Alta., www.agri-trade.com 7-10—Saskatoon Fall Fair, Prairieland Park, Saskatoon, Sask., www.saskatoonex.com 13-14—Canfax Cattle Market Forum, Deerfoot Inn, Calgary, Alta. 15—Best of Canadian Agri-marketing Association Awards, Saskatoon, Sask., www. bestofcama.com, www.cama.org

19-24—Canadian Western Agribition, Evraz Place, Regina, Sask., www.agribition.com

January 2013

12-27—107th National Western Stock Show, National Western Complex, Denver, Colorado 23-25—Saskatchewan Beef Industry Conference, Saskatoon Inn, Saskatoon, Sask.

February

7-8—Manitoba Beef Producers AGM, Victoria Inn, Brandon, Man.

SALES December

4—MJT Cattle Co. Ltd. — Hereford and Angus Dispersal, at the ranch, Edgerton, Alta. 15—Perrot-Martin Charolais Complete Herd Dispersal, at the farm, Niacam, Sask.  Event listings are a free service to industry.  Sale listings are for our advertisers. Your contact is Deborah Wilson at 403-325-1695 or [email protected]

AD INDEX Page Agrowplow Canada 45 Bar T5 Agra Services 48 Beef Improvement Ontario 44 Boehringer Ingelheim 19 Bow Slope Shipping Assoc. 31 Calgary Stockyards Ltd. 31 Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show 37 Canadian Angus Assoc. IFC, 3 Canadian Charolais Assoc. OBC Canadian Gelbvieh Assoc. 44 Canadian Hereford Assoc. 44 Canadian Limousin Assoc. 44 Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society 44 Canadian Shorthorn Assoc. 43 Canadian Simmental Assoc. 44 Canadian Welsh Black Society 44 Canfax Cattle Market Forum 21 Direct Livestock Marketing 31, 47 Double D Custom Hats 48 Ford Motor Company Canada 17 Frontier Western Shop 48 General Motors 5 Greener Pastures 29 Grunthal Livestock Auction Mart 31 Home Quarter Mercantile & Pie 48 Innisfail Auction Market Ltd. 31 International Stock Foods 44 Iron Solutions Inc. 25 Kawartha Lakes Co-op 31 Lakeland Group/Northstar 10 a-p Meadow Lake Stockyards Ltd. 31 Merck Animal Health 35, IBC Merial 7 New Holland 9 Norheim Ranching 44 Novartis Animal Health Canada 13 Ontario Livestock Exchange 31 Pasture Pro 45 Perlich Bros. Auction Market Ltd. 31 Pfizer Animal Health A 1-16 Picture Butte Auction Market 31 Pioneer Hi-Bred Ltd. 14, 15 Real Industries 47 Red Brand Fence 29 Southern Alberta Livestock 25 Vermeer Corporation 23 VJV Foothills Livestock Auction 31 Winnipeg Livestock Sales Ltd. 31 Xplornet 39

52 CATTLEMEN / AUGUST 2012

Canadian Angus Assoc. board of directors (l-r): Cecilie Fleming, director; Kevin Blair, president elect; Jon Fox, director; Jerome Richard, director; Lorraine Sanford, director; Tom McDonald, director; Lois McRae, director; Dawn Wilson, director; Gar y Latimer, president; Corinne Gibson, director; Jim Colodey, director; David Bolduc, past president; Rob Smith, CEO.

Canadian Limousin Assoc. board of directors. Seated (l-r): Anne BrunetBurgess (general manager), Bill Campbell (president), Brian Lee (vice-president), Terr y Hepper (treasurer). Standing (l-r), directors: Tim Andrew, Alta.; Jim Richmond, Alta.; Lynn Combest, Alta.; Dale Turner, Sask. Missing: Kelly Yorga, Sask. and Luc Forcier, Que. www.canadiancattlemen.ca

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The science of healthier animals Untitled-6 1

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CCA2012.indd 1

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STOCK BUYER’S C FALL FEEDER SALES

AUGUST 2012

SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION

BRITISH COLUMBIA ABBOTSFORD McClary Stockyards Ltd.* Box 40, Abbotsford, B.C. V2T 6Z4 Phone: 604-864-2381 • Fax: 604-854-3038 E-mail: [email protected] Website: mcclarystockyards.com Contact: Jono Rushton ............................. 604-823-2125 Dave Rushton ............................ 604-823-6692 Regular Sales: Every Mon., 11 a.m. – Slaughter & feeder cattle, sheep & goats Every Wed., 1 p.m. – Dairy & beef cattle Special Sales: Contact for details

ARMSTRONG Valley Auction Ltd.* 903 Raffan Road Armstrong, B.C. V0E 1B7 Phone: 250-546-9420 • Fax: 250-546-3399 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.valleyauction.ca Contact: Peter Raffan .............................. 250-260-0758 Rod Burnett ............................... 250-308-8185 Donald J. Raffan ........................ 250-558-6789 Regular Sales: Thurs., 11 a.m. – All breeds Special Sales: Check website for details Internet Sales: Canadian Satellite Livestock Auction www.cslauction.com (see Red Deer)

DAWSON CREEK VJV Dawson Creek Auction 301-116th Ave., Dawson Creek, B.C. V1G 3C9 Phone: 250-782-3766 • Fax: 250-782-6622 Contact: Don Fessler ................................ 250-719-5561 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., 10 a.m. Special sales: Mon., Sept. 17; Oct. 15, 22, 29; Nov. 19; Dec. 10, 17 – Calves & yearlings Mon., Nov. 5, 26; Dec. 3 – Bred cows & heifers Sat., Sept. 29 – Horses Internet Sales: Canadian Satellite Livestock Auction www.cslauction.com (see Red Deer)

KAMLOOPS B.C. Livestock Producers Co-operative Association* #1 10145 Dallas Dr., Kamloops, B.C. V2C 6T4 Phone: 250-573-3939 • Fax: 250-573-3170 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.bclivestock.bc.ca Contact: Tom Vicars ................................. 250-573-3939 Wilf Smith .................................. 250-398-7174 Al Smith ..................................... 250-567-4333 Larry Jordan ............................... 250-573-3939 Wayne Jordan ............................. 250-573-3939 Regular Sales: Okanagan Falls: Mondays Kamloops: Tuesdays Williams Lake: Thursdays Vanderhoof: Fridays Special Sales: Horse sales/equipment/bred cow & heifers/bull sales Internet Sales: TEAM (The Electronic Auction Market) www.teamauctionsales.com (see Calgary)

LANGLEY Fraser Valley Auctions 21801 – 56th Avenue Langley, B.C. V2Y 2M9 Phone: 604-534-3241 • Fax: 604-534-4770 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.fraservalleyauction.com Contact: Ken Pearson ............................... 604-534-3241 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 11 a.m. – Cattle Special Sales: Aug. 14, 28; Sept. 11; Oct. 2, 7 p.m. – Mixed feeder

ALBERTA BONNYVILLE Western Pride Auction Co. Ltd.* Box 6587, Bonnyville, Alta. T9N 2H1 Phone: 780-826-2233 • Fax: 780-826-2243 Contact: Marc Jubinville........................... 780-826-0992 Andy Jubinville ........................... 780-645-6695 Robert Gagne ............................. 780-826-1131 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 10 a.m. Special Sales: Contact for details

BROOKS Bow Slope Shipping* Box 1299, Brooks, Alta. T1R 1C2 Phone: 403-362-5521 • Fax: 403-362-5541 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.bowslope.com Contact: Manager, Rod MacLean ............. 403-793-3060 Lachie McKinnon ............................................... Lowell Johnston.................................................. Regular Sales: Every Fri., 9 a.m. Special Sales: Fri., Sept. 7, 10 a.m. – 72th Annual Anniversary sale, yearlings & calves Mon., Sept. 17, 1 p.m. – Sheep & goats Wed., Sept. 26, 5:30 p.m. – Horses & tack Oct. 22, 23, 29; Nov. 5, 10 a.m. – Red & Black Angus calf sales Oct. 24, 31; Nov. 4, 10 a.m.– LimoX & CharX calf sales Oct. 27; Nov. 3, 10 a.m. – Rancher calf sales

Nov. 12, 14, 21; Dec. 3, 10 a,m. – All breed calf sales Nov. 17, 21, 24, 28; Dec. 5, 8, 13, 12 noon – Bred cows & heifers Internet Sales: Every Thurs. DLMS www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

CALGARY Calgary Stockyards – Strathmore 1 mile west of Strathmore on Trans Canada Hwy. Phone: 403-934-3344 • Fax: 403-934-4383 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.calgarystockyards.com Contact: Don Danard................................ 403-234-7429 Bryan Danard............................. 403-934-1644 Will Irvine ................................... 403-560-4343 Bill Wilson.................................. 403-560-5265 Jason Danard ............................. 403-519-8916 Lester Gurnett ............................ 403-681-3151 Cliff Pahl.................................... 403-854-1900 Ben Payne .................................. 403-633-4175 Jeff Van Wert .............................. 403-793-9988 Regular Sales: Thurs., 8 a.m. – All classes Every Wed. starting Nov. 2 to Dec. 14, 11 a.m. – Bred cows & heifers Special Sales: Calf sales every Sat., Oct. 13 to Dec. 1 Internet Sales: TEAM (The Electronic Auction Market) www.teamauctionsales.com Calgary Stockyards Ltd. #200-5925 12th St. S.E. Calgary, Alta. T2H 2M3 Contact: Jason Danard ............................. 403-519-8916 Don Danard................................ 403-234-7429 Will Irvine ................................... 403-560-4343 Bill Wilson.................................. 403-560-5265 Bryan Danard............................. 403-934-1644 Lester Gurnett ............................ 403-681-3151 Cliff Pahl.................................... 403-854-1900 Ben Payne .................................. 403-633-4175 Jeff Van Wert .............................. 403-793-9988 TEAM (The Electronic Auction Market) Contact: Jason Danard ............................. 403-234-7429 Regular Sales: Thurs., 9:30 a.m. MST – Slaughter cattle Fri., 9 a.m. MST – Feeder cattle Real time bidding, picture, pre-approval required for bidding www.teamauctionsales.com

NOTES

_ _____________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________ _ _____________________________________________________________ CLYDE Nilsson Bros. Inc. Box 119, Clyde, Alta. T0G 0P0 Phone: 780-348-5893 • Fax: 780-348-5704 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.nbinc.com Contact: Len Hrehorets......................................991-6737 Garth Rogers.......................................349-1491 Purebred & special sales Travis Rogers......................................307-3144 Regular Sales: Tues. & Thurs., 9 a.m. Special Sales: Tues., Sept. 11; Oct. 9; Nov. 13 – Angus influence sales Sat., Nov. 10 – Farm Fair Top Ten Bred Heifer sale Sat., Dec. 1 – Annual Cow Extravaganza Contact for details Internet sales: DLMS www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton) Contact: Reagan Huculak......................... 780-554-4939

DRAYTON VALLEY Sekura Livestock* Box 6808, Drayton Valley, Alta. T7A 1S2 Phone: 780-542-4337 • Fax: 780-542-3444 E-mail [email protected] Website: www.sekuraauctions.com Contact: Corey Sekura............................... 780-898-5600 Mack Vars................................... 780-898-5604 Roy Abey..................................... 780-898-5605 Travis Sekura.............................. 780-621-6841 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., 9 a.m. – Cattle Special Sales: Call for fall feeder, stock cow & bred heifer sale dates

Edmonton DLMS #303 13220 St. Albert Trail Edmonton, Alta. T5L 4W1 Phone: 780-554-4939 • Fax: 780-7324385 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.dlms.ca Internet Sales: Thurs., 10 a.m. MT– DLMS Direct Off-farm cattle sales Daily (fall, winter & spring) – Live broadcast of presort

sales from auction rings across Western Canada. Purebred and Specialty Sales Pre-approval required for bidding Participating markets: Assiniboia Livestock Market; Balog Auction Services; Bow Slope Shipping Assoc.; Burnt Lake Livestock Market; Cowtown Livestock Exchange; Highwood Livestock Auction; Fort Macleod Auction; Grande Prairie Livestock Market; Heartland Livestock Services (HLS) Lloydminster; HLS Yorkton; HLS Prince Albert; HLS Swift Current; HLS Moose Jaw; HLS Brandon; HLS Virden; NBI Clyde; NBI Vermilion; Provost Livestock Exchange; Saskatoon Livestock Sales; Weyburn Livestock Exchange.

FORT MACLEOD Southern Alberta Livestock Exchange Box 1330, Fort Macleod, Alta. T0L 0Z0 Phone: 403-553-3315 • Fax: 403-553-4264 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.livestock.ab.ca Contact: Darren Shaw............................... 403-601-5165 Justin Keeley............................... 403-627-6534 Dan McDougall........................... 403-634-0604 Allan Lively................................. 403-627-7776 Sheep/ hog Blaine Kellington................................. 403-312-1279 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m. – Mixed cattle Every Thurs., Oct. & Nov., 10 a.m. – Calves Internet sales: DLMS www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

Grande Prairie Grande Prairie Livestock Market 14809 – 100 St., Grande Prairie, Alta. T8V 7C2 Phone: 780-532-3949 • Fax: 780-532-2211 Website: www.gplmcattle.com Contact: Marty Gilfillan............................. 780-831-4399 Ralph Calder............................... 780-518-5586 Regular Sales: Every Wed. Special sales: See our website or a calendar from the GPLM. Internet Sales: DLMS www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

HIGH RIVER Southern Alberta Livestock Exchange Box 5145, High River, Alta. T1V 1M3 Phone: 403-652-3343 • Fax: 403-652-3446 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.livestock.ab.ca Contact: Darren Shaw............................... 403-601-5165 Allan Lively................................. 403-627-7776 Peter Wambeke........................... 403-652-9647 Justin Keeley............................... 403-627-6534 Sheep & hogs Blaine Kellington........................ 403-312-1279 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 9 a.m. – Mixed cattle Fri., Oct. & Nov., 10 a.m. – Calves Internet Sales: DLMS www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

INNISFAIL Innisfail Auction Mart* 4504 – 42 St., Innisfail, Alta. T4G 1P6 Toll free 1-800-710-3166 Phone: 403-227-3166 • Fax: 403-227-2202 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.innisfailauctionmarket.com Contact: Jack Daines................................. 403-227-5113 Danny Daines............................. 403-227-1075 Duane Daines............................. 403-358-4971 Mark Daines................................ 403-350-0200 Regular Sales: Every Wed. – All classes of cattle Every Mon. in the fall, 10 a.m. – Calves Bi-weekly horse sales

LETHBRIDGE Balog Auction Services Inc. Box 786, Lethbridge, Alta. T1J 3Z6 Phone: 403-320-1980 • Toll free 877-320-1988 Fax: 403-320-2660 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.balogauction.com Contact: R.C. (Bob) Balog......................... 403-320-1980 Louis Balog................................. 403-331-0611 Brad Balog.................................. 403-642-7444 Mark Lenz................................... 403-330-7600 Andy Carrol................................. 403-308-9493 Ron Reid..................................... 403-625-0233 ................................................... 403-320-1980 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 10:30 a.m. – Finished cows & bulls 12:30 p.m. – Special yearling sales Special Sales: Aug. 17, 1:30 p.m. – The Fall Roundup Brand of Excellence video cattle sale feat. yearlings & calves for immediate delivery, Lethbridge Lodge Every Fri., Sept. 14 to Dec. 21, 10:30 a.m. – Rancher calves Tues., Oct. 23, Nov. 6 10:30 a.m. – British breed calves Tues., Oct. 30, 10:30 a.m. – Angus Appreciation calf sale Every Mon., Oct. 29 to Dec. 17, 1 p.m. – Special stock cow & bred heifer sales Sat., Nov. 24, 1 p.m. – 14th Annual Rainbow’s End replacement bred & open heifer sale

Perlich Bros. Auction Market Ltd.* Box 1057, Lethbridge, Alta. T1J 4A2 Phone: 403-329-3101 • Fax: 403-327-2288 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.perlich.com Contact: Bob Perlich................................. 403-382-7800 Darcy Moorhead.......................... 403-635-0308 John Perlich................................ 403-331-9911 Ken Lidberg................................. 403-382-8189 Regular Sales: Thurs., 10:30 a.m. – Slaughter cattle Thurs., 11:30 a.m. – Yearling cattle Special Sales: Every Mon. & Wed., Oct. to Dec., 10 a.m. – Calves Every Tues., Nov. to Dec., 1 p.m. – Stock cows & bred heifers Every Thurs., Sept. to Oct., 11:30 a.m. – Special yearlings Every Sat., Oct. 15 to Nov. 12 – Presort

MEDICINE HAT Medicine Hat Feeding Co.* 3381 Gershaw Dr. S.W., Medicine Hat, Alta. T1B 3N2 Toll free 1-800-452-3129 Phone: 403-526-3129 • Fax: 403-528-9355 Website: www.mhfc.ca Contact: Lyle Taylor................................... 403-528-0797 Nolan Herman............................. 403-502-6417 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 9:30 a.m. Special Sales: Fri., Aug. 31; Sept. 7, 10 a.m. – Special yearling sales Mon., Oct. 15, 22, 29; Nov. 5, 10 a.m. – Presort calves Wed., Oct. 24, 31, 10 a.m. – Presort calf sales Fri., Oct. 19, 26; Nov. 2, 9, 16; Dec. 7., 10 a.m. – Presort calf sales Mon., Nov. 14, 21, 28; Dec. 5, 12, 19, 1 p.m. – Bred cows & heifers

OLDS

NOTES

_ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________ _ __________________________

Olds Auction Mart Ltd.* 4613 – 54 St., Olds, Alta. T4H 1E9 Phone: 403-556-3655 • Fax: 403-556-2688 Website: www.oldsauction.com Contact: Dan Rosehill............................... 403-556-4458 Jim Crawford............................... 403-556-4457 Greg Sanderson.......................... 403-559-7204 Joel Waddell................................ 403-512-6151 Tyler Rosehill............................... 403-507-1782 Patrick Cassidy........................... 403-559-7202 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m. – All classes Special Sales: Every Fri., Sept. to Dec., 10 a.m. – Presort calves (load lots) Every Fri., Dec. to Apr., 2013, 10 a.m. – Preconditioned calves Every Tues., Oct. to Dec., 1 p.m. – Bred heifers & cow dispersals

PICTURE BUTTE Picture Butte Auction Market 2001 Ltd.* Box 6, Picture Butte, Alta. T0K 1V0 Phone: 403-732-4400 • Fax: 403-732-4405 Website: www.picturebutteauction.ca Contact: Erik............................................. 403-308-6662 Steven......................................... 403-715-9305 Regular Sales: Tues., 10:30 a.m. – Cattle Sat., 11 a.m. – All livestock Special sales: 10:30 a.m. Tues., Aug. 28; Sept. 18 – Yearlings Tues., Oct. 23, 30 – All breeds of calves Tues., Nov. 6 – Angus calves featured Tues., Nov. 13 – Charolais calves Sat., Oct 6, 13, 20, 27; Nov. 3, 10,17, 12 noon – All breeds of calves

PONOKA Vold, Jones and Vold Auction Co. Ltd.* 4410 Hwy. 2A, Ponoka, Alta. T4J 1J8 Phone: 403-783-5561 • Fax: 403-783-4120 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.vjvauction.com Contact: Mike Brennan............................. 403-783-1074 Neil Campbell............................. 780-814-4113 Trevor Duke................................. 403-740-5753 Donny Fessler.............................. 250-719-5561

Mel Heintz................................... 780-922-3449 Mitch Hettler............................... 403-302-0681 Craig Jacklin............................... 403-783-1453 Ron Kramer................................. 250-827-3245 Doug Lamoureux......................... 403-392-4317 Harry Makkinga(dairy).................. 403-783-1274 Stan Skeels................................. 403-704-0288 Nansen Vold................................ 403-783-0349 Andrew Wildeboer....................... 780-348-9358 Trapper Green............................. 780-837-0171 Regular Sales: Every Wed. 8:30 a.m. – Butcher cows/bulls (rings 1, 2); 9 a.m. – Stockers & feeders (ring 1) 11 a.m. – Canadian Satellite Livestock Auction followed by Canadian Gold Show Alley with live online bidding (ring 1); Hay & straw (outside); 12 noon – Dairy cows/baby calves, hogs (ring 3); 2 p.m. – Bred cows & heifers, cow-calf pairs (ring 2) Special Sales: Sat., Sept. 8 – All breed horse sale Sat., Oct.13 – Calf/yearling sale feat. Speckle Park Sat., Oct. 20 – Calf/yearling sale feat. Simmental/Charolais Sat., Oct. 27 – Calf/yearling sale feat. Angus/Limo Sat., Nov. 3, 24; Dec. 15 – Bred cow & heifer sale Internet Sales: Canadian Satellite Livestock Auction www.cslauction.com (see Red Deer)

PROVOST Provost Livestock Exchange* Box 808, Provost, Alta. T0B 3S0 Phone: 780-753-2369 • Fax: 780-753-2493 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.plecattle.com Contact: Jerry Hewson............................... 306-753-7788 Dean Lawes................................ 780-753-0803 Jack Lawes.................................. 780-753-0813 Darcy Lakevold........................... 780-753-8669 Wayne Black............................... 403-578-4640 Regular Sales: Every Fri., 9 a.m. – Butcher cows & bulls, yearlings & reputation stocker calves (presort cattle sell first) Special Sales: Fri., Oct. 5 to Dec. 21 9 a.m. – Presort live broadcast all breed calves Mon., Oct. 22 to Nov. 26, 9 a.m. – Presort live broadcast all breed calves Mon., Oct. 29; Nov. 12 – Black & Red Angus, Limosin X calves Wed., Nov. 14, 21, 28; Dec. 5, 12, 19, – Bred heifers & stock cows Internet Sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

RED DEER Burnt Lake Livestock Mart 131A-28042-Hwy 11 Red Deer, Alta. T4S 2L4 Phone: 403-347-6100 • Fax: 403-340-3560 Website: www.burntlakelivestock.com Contact: Mel Glencross............................. 403-358-9442 Ken Buckland............................. 403-350-0889 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., 9 a.m. – Slaughter

BRD PFIZER REVOLUTIONIZED THE WAY CALVES ARE PROTECTED AGAINST BOVINE RESPIRATORY DISEASE

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10 a.m. – Feeder cattle & calves Special Sales: 10 a.m. Aug. 23, 30; Sept. 6, 13, 20 – Yearlings Sept. 27 – Calf & yearlings Oct. 4, 25; Nov. 8 – Angus influence Oct. 11, 18; Nov. 1 – Charolais & Simmental calves Nov. 8 – British breeds influence calves Nov. 15, 22 – All breed calves Nov. 1, 8, 15 – Feeder Dec. 6, 202 – Bred cow & heifers Internet Sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton) Canadian Satellite Livestock Auction Box 26005, Red Deer, Alta. T4N 6X7 Phone: 403-346-8365 • Fax: 340-2019 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.cslauction.com Canadian Satellite Livestock Auction now offers a total internet service, in association with OnLine Ringman, the largest Internet auction company. Live sales are broadcast every Wednesday at 11 a.m. on www.cslauction.com featuring live video with internet bidding on the cattle as well as phone-in bidding. Live Auctioneer, Live Video, Real-Time Bidding. Call for details on bull sales or farm sales.

RIMBEY Rimbey Auction Mart* Box 680, Rimbey, Alta. T0C 2J0 Phone: 403-843-2439 • Fax: 403-843-3485 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.rimbeyauction.com Contact: Allen Olson.................................. 403-783-0556 Darryl Friesen.............................. 403-318-1630 Barry Neumeier........................... 403-350-8222 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m. – All classes Special Sales: Sept. 18 – Charolais calves Sept. 25 – Simmental calves Oct 23; Nov. 23 – Angus calves Oct. 26; Nov. 16, 30; Dec. 7, 21 – Bred cows Internet Sales: TEAM (The Electronic Auction Market) www.teamauctionsales.com (see Calgary) Contact: Darryl Friesen

STAVELY

THORSBY

VJV Foothills Livestock Auction Stavely Box 10, Stavely, Alta. T0L 1Z0 Phone: 403-549-2120 • Toll free 877-549-2121 Fax: 403-549-2253 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.vjvfoothillsauction.com Contact: Rob Bergevin.............................. 403-625-7171 Kim Cochlin................................ 403-625-1035 Lorne Depaoli.............................. 403-652-0344 Regular Sales: Every Fri., 9 a.m. – Slaughter cattle, feeder cattle to follow Special Sales: Every Mon., through out Oct. & Nov. Contact for details Internet sales: Canadian Satellite Livestock Auction www.cslauction.com (see Red Deer)

Thorsby Auction Mart Ltd.* Box 379, Thorsby, Alta. T0C 2P0 Phone/Fax: 780-789-3915 Contact: Harley Steinke (Res.).................. 780-986-1097 (Cell)........................................... 780-991-6307 Regular Sales: Every Mon. at 12 noon – All breed mixed livestock Horse sale first Thurs. of the month, 6 p.m. Special Sales: Bred cow, heifer & bull sales to be announced. Contact for details

STETTLER Stettler Auction Mart (1990) Ltd.* Box 1238, Stettler, Alta. T0C 2L0 Phone: 403-742-2368 • Fax: 403-742-8151 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.stettlerauction.ab.ca Contact: Jim Abel...................................... 403-740-9609 Greg Hayden............................... 403-740-9610 Brad Lohr.................................... 780-679-5500 Dick Creasey............................... 403-740-9434 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m. – Mixed sales Fri., 10 a.m. – Special calf/bred cows Special Sales: Aug. 14, 28; Sept. 4, 18 – Yearling feeder Sept. 25; Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26; Nov. 9 – Presorted calves, single owner lots Oct. 12; Nov. 2 – Angus/British calves Oct. 27; Nov. 16, 23, 30; Dec. 7, 14, 21 – Bred cows & heifers Nov.2 – Limousin calves Nov. 6 – Charolais & Simmental calves Dec. 4, 11 – Preconditioned calves All cattle scanned. Watch for age verified sales Internet Sales: www.stettlerauction.ab.ca

VERMILION Nilsson Bros. Livestock Exchange Box 3300, Vermilion, Alta. T9X 2B2 Phone: 780-853-5372 • Fax: 780-853-2521 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.nbinc.com Contact: Rusty Stalwick............................ 780-853-7669 Jim Pulyk..................................... 780-853-0626 Bob Foxwell................................. 780-842-0410 Les Trach.................................... 780-645-0939 Harvey Trach............................... 780-645-5172 Pat Lawerence............................ 780-826-2655 Steiger Stalwick.......................... 780-853-7946 Dave Crittal.......................306-344-2188/2184 Ryan Noble.................................. 306-839-7949 Roland Goertz ............................ 780-656-0506 Lorne Davey............................. 306-843-7606 Regular Sales: Every Wed. 9 a.m. – Butcher cows & bulls 12 noon – Presort Internet sales Special Sales: Sat., Oct. 20; Nov. 3, 10 a.m. – Angus influence presort Internet calves Sat., Oct. 27, 10 a.m. – Exotic cross presort Internet calves Sat., Nov. 24; Dec. 1, 22, 12 noon – Bred cow/heifer sales Mon., Dec. 3, 12 noon – Annual Westman Farms bred heifer sale Sat., Dec. 8, 12 noon – 800 Black Angus cow dispersal sale Mon., Dec. 10, 12 noon – Y-Coulee bred heifer sale Sat., Dec. 15, 12 noon – Bred cow sale (open consignment) Mon., Dec.17, 12 noon – Bred heifer sale (open consignment) Internet Sales: DLMS www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

VETERAN Dryland Cattle Trading Corp. Box 615, Veteran, Alta. T0C 2S0 Phone: 403-575-3772 • Fax: 403-575-3935 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.drylandcattle.com Contact: Ian Goodbrand............................ 780-753-1515 Graham Schetzsle....................... 403-575-4001 Bob Wills..................................... 403-575-1108 Kirk Goldsmith............................ 403-575-5654 George Glazier............................. 403-575-1165 Kurt Cole..................................... 403-575-5388 Regular Sales: Every Mon. – Slaughter cows & bulls, feeders Special Sales: Please check our website for dates for feeder calf, bred cow & bred heifer sales

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VIKING Viking Auction Market Ltd. Box 100, Viking, Alta. T0B 4N0 Phone: 780-336-2209 • Fax: 780-336-2278 E-mail: vikau[email protected] Website: www.vikingauctionmarket.ca Contact: Cliff Grinde ................................ 780-336-6333 Darcy Sheets .............................. 780-336-6485 Allen Stefiuk............................... 780-632-8701 Garry Zimmer ............................. 780-889-3793 Robert Kunnick .......................... 780-336-6301 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m. – Cattle

WESTLOCK Triple J Livestock Ltd. 9004 – 110 A St., Westlock, Alta. T7P 2N4 Phone: 780-349-3153 • Fax: 780-349-5466 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.triplejlivestock.com Contact: Ken Assenheimer ....................... 780-305-3787 Ivan Potts ................................... 780-349-1270 Bob Scott ................................... 780-689-9203 Trent Ewasiw.............................. 780-349-0239 Hank Stach ................................ 780-898-3733 Wade Schaupmeyer ................... 780-305-4104 Regular Sales: Every Fri., 9:00 a.m. Every 2nd & 4th Wed. – Sheep & goats Every 3rd Sat. – Horse sale Special Sales: Call for details

NOTES

_____________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________ __________________________

SASKATCHEWAN ALAMEDA Alameda Auction Market Box 370, Alameda, Sask. S0C 0A0 Phone: 306-489-2221 • Fax: 306-489-2238 Contact: Brad Knutson ............................. 306-594-7637 Don Jermey................................. 306-483-7765 Regular Sales: 10 a.m. Wed., Sept. 12, 26; Oct. 3, 17, 31; Nov. 14, 28; Dec. 5, 12, – All classes Special Sales: Wed., Aug. 15, 29 – Yearlings Wed., Oct. 10, 24; Nov. 7, 21 – Presort calves Call for dates on bred cow sales

ASSINIBOIA Assiniboia Livestock Auction* Box 1328, Assiniboia, Sask. S0H 0B0 Phone: 306-642-5358 • Fax: 306-642-4549 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.assiniboiaauction.com Contact: Roy Rutledge Ryan Rutledge Chris Hannah Regular Sales: Every 2nd Wed. starting Oct. 10 to Dec. 19 Special Sales: Mon., Aug. 20 – Yearlings Sat., Dec. 1, 8, 15, 22 – Bred cow/heifers Internet sales: 11 a.m. (Pre-approval required for bidding) Sat., Oct. 27; Nov. 24, – Presorted Angus & Hereford calves Sat., Oct. 13, 20; Nov. 3, 10, 17, – Presorted Angus/ AngusX calves Tues., Oct. 16 – CharolaisX or Xbred calf/ yearlings Tues., Oct. 23; Nov. 13, 27 – Presorted CharX & Red AngusX calf/yearlings Tues., Oct. 30; Nov. 6 – Presorted CharX or Red AngusX calves Tues., Dec. 4, 11 – Presorted all breeds calf/yearlings Internet Sales: DLMS www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

GLENAVON Candiac Auction Mart Box 39, Glenavon, Sask. S0G 1Y0 Phone: 306-424-2967 • Fax: 306-424-2097 Contact: Kevin Czerwonka........................ 306-539-4090 Janet Czerwonka ........................ 306-429-2029 Brad Stenberg............................ 306-551-9411 Regular Sales: Every Fri., 10 a.m. Special Sales: Contact for details

KELVINGTON Kelvington Stockyards Box 640, Kelvington, Sask. S0A 1W0 Phone: 306-327-4642 • Fax: 306-327-4311 Contact: Clint Peterson ............................ 306-327-4642 Gary Rudychuk ........................... 306-865-7448 Special Sales: Contact for details

LEROSS Parkland Livestock Market* Box 250, Kelliher, Sask. S0A 1V0 Phone: 306-675-2077 • Fax: 306-675-2033 E-mail: [email protected] website: www.parklandlivestockmarket.com Contact: Brian Murry ................................ 306-621-1239 Robert Ross ............................... 306-795-7387 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., Aug. 16 to Dec. 13, 10 a.m. – Slaughter cows & bulls, feeder cattle & calves Special Sales: Aug. 16, 23, 30; Sept. 6, 13, 20, 27 – Off grass yearlings & calves Thurs. Oct., 25; Nov. 1, 15, 29; Dec. 6 – Red & Black Angus influence calves Nov. 3, 17; Dec. 1, 13 – Bred cow & heifers

LLOYDMINSTER Heartland Livestock Services Box 930, Lloydminster, Sask. S9V 1C4 Phone: 306-825-8831 • Fax: 306-825-7713 E-mail: [email protected] or [email protected] Website: www.hls.ca Contact: Russ Copeland........................... 780-808-6548 Wayne Woodman ........................ 306-821-6310 Doug Health ............................... 306-821-6668 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., 9 a.m. Special Sales: Every Wed. 8:30 a.m., Sept. 26 to Dec. 19 – Presort yearling & calves Wed., Oct. 17, Nov.28, 8:30 a.m. – Presort Black Angus & Angus influence calves Mon., Nov. 5, 8:30 a.m. – Special annual presort Black Angus & Angus sale Wed. Nov.7, 8:30 a.m. – Special annual presort Speckle Park sales Every Thurs., 10 a.m. – Off farm Internet sales Every Fri. in Nov. & Dec., 11 a.m. – Bred cows & heifers Internet Sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

MANKOTA Mankota Stockmen’s Weigh Co. Ltd.* Box 248, Mankota, Sask. S0H 2W0 Phone: 306-478-2229 • Fax: 306-478-2443 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.mankotastockmens.com Contact: John Williamson ......................... 306-478-2433 Ev Chanig .................................. 306-478-2229 Special Sales: 12 noon Sept. 7 – All classes feat. yearlings Oct. 5 – Special yearling sale Oct. 12 – All classes feat. yearlings & calves Oct. 19 – Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed Green Tag calf sale Oct. 26 – Red Angus, Hereford & Charolais calf sale Nov. 2 – Angus calf sale Nov. 9 – All breeds calf sale Nov. 16 – All classes Dec. 7 – 23nd Annual select bred heifer, open replacement & long yearling bulls Dec. 14 – All classes with bred cows & heifers

MAPLE CREEK Cowtown Livestock Exchange Inc.* Box 730, Maple Creek, Sask. S0N 1N0 Toll free 1-800-239-5933 Phone: 306-662-2648 • Fax: 306-662-2615 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.cowtownlivestock.ca Contact: Wayne Bowyer............................. 306-662-2648 Gordie Cameron.......................... 306-622-2234 Rocky Houff................................. 403-527-0352 Darvin Mason............................. 306-662-8218 Regular Sales: Tues., Aug. 7 to Oct. 19 & Nov. 6 to Dec. 18, 11 a.m. Special Sales: Thurs. Aug. 16, 23, 30; Sept. 6, 13 – Presorted yearlings Tues., Sept. 25; Tues., Nov. 6 – Off-truck yearlings with regular sale Sat., Oct. 13; Nov. 10 – Presort all breed calves Tues., Oct. 16 & Thurs., Oct. 18 – Presort Angus calves Sat, Oct. 20 – Presort Angus & Hereford calves Tues., Oct. 23 – Presort Charolais & Simmental calves Thurs., Oct. 25; Tues., Oct. 30 – Presort all breed calves feat. Angus Sat., Oct. 27; Thurs., Nov. 1 – Presort all breed calves feat. Angus & Hereford Thurs., Nov. 15, Nov. 22; – Bred cows & heifers Tues., Nov. 20, 27 – Regular sale with bred cows & heifers Thurs., Nov. 29 – Money in the Bank bred heifer sale Sat., Dec. 1 – Presort fresh-weaned & preconditioned calves Thurs., Dec. 6 – Cowtown Cowmaker bred heifer sale Internet Sales: DLMS www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

Meadow lake Meadow Lake Stockyards Ltd. Box 130, Meadow Lake, Sask. S9X 1Y1

Phone: 306-236-3411 • Fax: 306-236-3412 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.mlstockyards.com Contact: Brent Brooks.......................................240-5340 Brad Brooks........................................240-5342 Blair Brooks........................................240-9883 Regular Sales: Mon., 9:30 a.m. – Calf & yearlings Thurs., 11 a.m. – Presort internet from Oct. 4 Fri., 12 noon – Bred cows from Nov. 30 Monthly horse sales Internet sales: TEAM (The Electronic Auction Market) www.teamauctionsales.com (see Calgary)

MOOSE JAW Heartland Livestock Services Box 608, Moose Jaw, Sask. S6H 4P4 Phone: 306-692-2385 • Fax: 306-692-7996 E-mail: [email protected] Contact: Grant Barnett......................................631-0410 Tyler Cronkhite....................................630-6846 Jerrad Schollar....................................630-4059 Regular Sales: Thurs. starting Sept. 13 (after the presort sale) Special Sales: 9:30 a.m. Tues., Aug. 14 – Presort yearlings Tues., Aug. 28; Sept. 11, 25 – Presort yearling & calves Thurs., Oct. 11 – Presort yearlings & calves Tues, Oct. 16; Nov. 27; Dec. 4, 11 – Presort calves all breeds Thurs., Oct 25; Nov.1, 8, 15,22, 29 – Presort calves all breeds Tues., Oct. 23 – 32nd annual Red & Black Angus presort sale Tues., Oct. 30 – Charolais Extravaganza sale Tues., Nov. 6. – Red & Black Angus presort sale Tues., Nov 13 – Charolais & Simmental presort sale Internet sales: DLMS www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton) Johnstone Auction Mart Ltd.* Box 818, Moose Jaw, Sask. S6H 4P5 Phone: 306-693-4715 • Fax: 306-691-6650

E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.johnstoneauction.ca Contact: Scott Johnstone.......................... 306-631-0767 Corey Mantell.............................. 306-631-1888 Regular Sales: Every Sat. – All breeds bred cows/heifers/pairs

PRINCE ALBERT Heartland Livestock Services Box 186, Prince Albert, Sask. S6V 5R5 Phone: 306-763-8463 • Fax: 306-763-4620 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.hls.ca Contact: Glen Smith.................................. 306-960-4732 Regular Sales: Every Mon., 9:00 a.m.; Tues., 8:30 a.m. Thurs., 8:30 a.m. Special Sales: Call in advance for the summer schedule

Saskatoon Saskatoon Livestock Sales Ltd.* Box 60, Saskatoon, Sask. S7K 3K1 Phone: 306-382-8088 • Fax: 306-382-8319 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.saskatoonlivestocksales.com Contact: Michael Fleury.....................................222-9526 Bob Blacklock.....................................221-8943 Harvey Welter......................................227-8684 Alvin Busby.........................................221-0905 Regular Sales: Every Mon., Tues., Wed., 9 a.m. – All classes Special Sales: Mon., Nov 5, 19 – Calf sale feat. Angus calves Sat., Oct. 27; Nov. 17 – Presorted all breed calves Fri., Nov. 9, 23; Dec. 7, 20, 12 noon – Bred cow & bred heifer Fri., Dec. 14 – Special bred heifer sale Purebred bull & female sales (refer to our website) Internet Sales: DLMS www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton) TEAM (The Electronic Auction Market) www.teamauctionsales.com (see Calgary)

SHAUNAVON Shaunavon Livestock Sales (88) Ltd. Box 1419, Shaunavon, Sask. S0N 2M0 Phone: 306-297-2457 • Fax: 306-297-2371 Contact: Ralph Oberle............................... 306-297-2304 Kelly Oberle................................. 306-297-3430 Regular Sales: Usually Mon. at least one per month, 12 noon Contact for details Fall Sales: Contact for details Special Sales: Fall sorted calf sales & bred sales Contact for details

SPIRITWOOD Spiritwood Stockyards (1984) Ltd.* Box 160, Spiritwood, Sask. S0J 2M0 Phone: 306-883-2168 • Fax: 306-883-3913 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.spiritwoodstockyards.ca Contact: Brian Jacobson........................... 306-883-7375 Fred Walter................................. 306-883-7368 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 9 a.m. on real-time Internet (incl. individual producer presort show pens) Internet Sales: TEAM (The Electronic Auction Market) www.teamauctionsales.com (see Calgary)

SWIFT CURRENT Heartland Livestock Services Box 367, Swift Current, Sask. S9H 3V8 Phone: 306-773-3174 • Fax: 306-773-8570 E-mail: [email protected] Contact: Lee Crowley ................................ 306-741-5701 Steve Muddle ............................. 306-741-5115 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m. All classes of feeder & Slaughter cattle Special Sales: Thurs., Sept. 6, 9:30 a.m. – Sorted yearlings Tues., Sept. 25, 9:00 a.m. – Off truck yearlings Thurs., Oct. 11; Nov. 15, 22, 29, 9:30 a.m. – Sorted all breed calves Sat., Dec. 8 – Sorted all breed Sat., Oct. 13, 20; Nov. 3, 10, 17, 24; – Sorted Black & Red Angus calves Thurs., Oct. 18. 9:30 a.m. – All breed feat. Charolais Thurs., Oct. 25, 9:30 a.m. – Sorted Charolais & Gelbvieh calves Sat., Oct. 27, 9:30 a.m. – Sorted ranch calves Thurs., Nov. 1, 9:30 a.m. – Sorted all breed calves feat. Simmental Thurs., Nov. 8, 9:30 a,m. – Sorted all breed calves feat. Angus Tues., Nov. 13, 20, 27, 1 p.m. – Bred cow & heifers Thurs., Dec. 6, 13, 1 p.m. – Bred cow & heifers Sat., Dec. 1, 1 p.m. – Cadieux Reg. Black Angus herd dispersal Mon., Dec. 3, 1 p.m. – Six Mile Red Angus bred heifers Mon., Dec. 10, 1 p.m. – Rock Solid bred heifers Thurs., Dec. 20 1 p.m. – Bred cow & heifers feat. Lost Valley Black Angus dispersal Internet sales: Direct Livestock Marketing Systems www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

TISDALE Edwards Livestock Centre Box 727, Tisdale, Sask. S0E 1T0 Phone: 306-873-5049 • Fax: 306-873-2328 Contact: Bruce Edwards .......................... 306-873-5049 Bruce Edwards(Cell) .................. 306-873-7779 Bryan Hadland(Cell) .................. 306-921-7667 Regular Sales: Assembly for all local auction markets. Contact for details Special Sales: Livestock sales facility available for your elite purebred bull & female sales & commercial stock cow sales. Contact for details

WEYBURN Weyburn Livestock Exchange* Box 1504, Weyburn, Sask. S4H 3N8 Phone: 306-842-4574 • Fax: 306-842-3610 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.weyburnlivestock.com Contact: Dean Martins Ryan Rutledge Brennin Jack Regular Sales: Every 2nd Wed., Sept. 5 to Dec. 12, 9 a.m. – Cull cows & bulls Special Sales: Mon., Aug. 27; Sept. 10 . – Presorted yearlings

Internet sales: (pre-approval required for bidding) Mon., Oct. 1; Nov. 19; Dec.3, 10, 11 a.m. – Presort all breed calves & yearlings Mon., Oct. 15, 29; Nov. 12, 26 – Presort Angus or AngusX calf/yearlings Mon., Oct. 22; Nov. 5 – Presort Charolais, Simmental & Xbred calf/yearlings Fri., Nov. 30; Dec. 7, 14, 21 – Bred cows & heifer sales Internet Sales: Direct Livestock Marketing Services www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

WHITEWOOD Whitewood Livestock Sales* Box 68, Whitewood, Sask. S0G 5C0 Phone: 306-735-2822 • Fax: 306-735-4284 Website: www.whitewoodlivestock.com Contact: Gene Parks................................. 204-729-7118 Rhett Parks ................................ 306-735-7813 Glen Vargo ................................. 306-736-7710 Chad Kelly ................................. 306-735-7810 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m. – All types of cattle Special Sales: Oct. 2; Nov. 8, 20, 27 – All breed presort feeders Oct. 9. – Simmental influence presort Oct. 16, 30; Nov. 13 – Angus influence presort Oct. 23 – Charolais influence presort Nov. 2, 16; Dec. 7, – Bred cow sales Dec. 18 – Last sale of 2012 Visit www.whitewoodlivestock.com for delivery schedules, market reports & contacts.

Mon., Sept. 16 to Apr., 8 a.m. – Cows, bulls & butcher cattle Special Sales: Wed., 10 a.m. – Internet presort calves Sept. 19, 26; Nov. 28 – All breeds Oct. 3; Nov. 7 – Angus featured Oct. 17; Nov. 21 – Simmental featured Oct. 24; Nov. 14 – Charolais featured Oct. 31 – Rancher's Choice Angus presort green tag sale Fri., Nov. 2, 23; Dec. 7, 14, 11 a.m. – Bred cow & heifers Wed., Dec. 5, 12, 8 a.m. – All breeds Fridays – Sheep, lamb & goat sell at 12 noon & horses at 5 p.m. Internet sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

MANITOBA ASHERN Interlake Cattlemen’s Co-op Assoc. Ltd.* Box 599, Ashern, Man. R0C 0E0 Phone: 204-768-2360 • Fax: 204-768-3690 E-mail: [email protected] www.ashernauction.com Contact: Lorne (Buddy) Bergner .............204-768-2669 Regular Sales: Every Wed. from mid Aug. to June, 2013, 9 a.m. – All classes of cattle Special Sales: Sat. 11 a.m. – Fall feeders Contact for details

BRANDON

YORKTON Heartland Livestock Services Box 490, 107 York Road E., Yorkton, Sask. S3N 2W4 Phone: 306-783-9437 • Fax: 306-782-4110 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.hls.ca Contact: Clayton Hawreluik...................... 306-621-3824 Harvey Exner .............................. 306-621-5486 Barry (Junior) Baczuk ............................... 306-621-5421 Regular Sales: Wed. Apr. to Sept. 12, 8 a.m. – All classes

Heartland Livestock Services* 329 – 12th Street North, Unit A Brandon, Man. R7A 7K4 Phone: 204-727-1431 • Fax: 204-727-6520 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.hls.ca Contact: Keith Cleaver (mgr.)................... 204-761-0668 Brad Delgaty .............................. 204-570-0716 Kyle Howarth .............................. 204-523-6770 Drillon Beaton ............................ 204-761-0947 John Lamport ............................. 204-724-0421

NOTES

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Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m. Every Thurs., 9 a.m. (Sept. to May, 2013) Special Sales: Internet presort calves Bred cows – Contact for details Internet sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

Regular Sales: Every Thurs., 9 a.m. – Cows, bulls, fats & feeders Special Sales: Bred cow sales as scheduled. Contact for details

GLADSTONE

Valley Livestock Sales Hwy. 10, Box 295, Minitonas, Man. R0L 1G0 Phone: 204-525-4363 • Fax: 204-525-2460 Contact: Randy Hart................................. 204-734-8624 Colin Hart .................................. 204-734-0422 Regular Sales: Every Mon., 10 a.m., Sept. to Apr. 2013 Closed in June & July

Gladstone Auction Mart* Box 318, Gladstone, Man. R0J 0T0 Phone: 204-385-2537 • Fax: 204-385-2582 E-mail: [email protected] Contact: Gerald McGowan........................ 204-385-2043 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 10 a.m. Oct. to Dec., 9 a.m. Special Sales: Contact for details

GRUNTHAL Grunthal Livestock Auction Mart* Box 71, Grunthal, Man. R0A 0R0 Phone: 204-434-6519 • Fax: 204-434-9367 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.grunthallivestock.com Contact: Harold Unrau ............................. 204-871-0250 Regular Sales: Tues., 9 a.m. – Cattle Special Sales: Check the website Internet Sales: TEAM Auction Sales www.teamauctionsales.com (see Calgary)

KILLARNEY Killarney Auction Mart Ltd.* Box 1435, Killarney, Man. R0K 1G0 Phone: 204-523-8477 • Fax: 204-523-8190 www.killarneyauctionmart.com Contact: Allan Munroe.............................. 204-523-6161 Scott Campbell .......................... 204-724-2131 Regular weekly Sales: Mon., 9 a.m. Special Sales: Bred cow sales as advertised. Spring bull sales

MELITA Taylor Auctions Box 568, Melita, Man. R0M 1L0 Phone: 204-522-3996 • Fax: 204-522-8121 E-mail: [email protected] Contact: Ross Taylor................................. 204-522-5356 Brock Taylor ............................... 204-522-6396

MINITONAS

STE. ROSE DU LAC Ste. Rose Auction Mart Ltd.* Box 450, Ste. Rose du Lac, Man. R0L 1S0 Phone: 204-447-2266 • Fax: 204-447-3369 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.srauctionmart.com Contact: Myles Masson ............................ 204-447-7054 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., 8 a.m. – Feeder calf sales (1,500 – 2,000 head) Special Sales: Oct. 25, 8 a.m. – Angus influence feeder (1,500 – 2,000 head) Nov. 27; Dec. 4, 11, 18, 11 a.m. – Annual bred cow & heifers Presorted show listings of 10 or more to be placed on Internet show listing with live video feeds provided by Online Ringman. On-farm videos can be taken of backgrounded cattle, bulls, bred cows & heifers and uploaded to our ring. Cattle accepted Tues. & Wed. Call for details.

STRATHCLAIR Strathclair Auction Mart Ltd. Box 155, Strathclair, Man. R0J 2C0 Phone: 204-365-5327 • Fax: 204-365-2051 Regular Sales: Every Mon., 10 a.m. – Cattle One Sat. a month 10:30 a.m. – Horses

VIRDEN Heartland Livestock Services* Box 340, Virden Man. R0M 2C0 Phone: 204-748-2809 • Fax: 204-748-3478 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.hls.ca Contact: Robin Hill ................................... 204-851-5465 Rick Gabrielle ........................... 204-851-0613 Jim Blackshaw ........................... 204-748-2809 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 9 a.m. – Feeder cattle Every Mon. Oct. 15 to Mar. 27, 2013, 9 a.m. – Butcher cows, bulls & fats Special Sales: Wed., Sept. 26; Oct. 3, 24; Nov. 14 – All breed presort Wed., Oct. 10 – Green tag Angus sale Wed. Oct. 17; Nov. 7, 21 – Angus presort sales Wed. Oct., 31 – Charolais presort sale Oct. 26; Nov. 9, 23,30; Dec. 3, 7, 14 – Bred cows Sheep & horse sales: Call for details Jan. to Apr. 2013 – Special presort & bred cow sales Internet sales: DLMS www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

WINNIPEG Winnipeg Livestock Sales Ltd.* Box 13, Group 220, R.R. 2 Winnipeg, Man. R3C 2E6 Phone: 204-694-8328 • Fax: 204-697-4476 Website: www.winnipeglivestocksales.com email: [email protected] Contact: Scott Anderson........................... 204-782-6222 Mike Nernberg............................ 204-930-9557 Jim Christie................................ 204-771-0753 Regular Sales: Every Fri., 8.a.m. – Feeder/slaughter cattle 1st & 3rd Thurs. of the month, 1 p.m. – Sheep & goat sale

ONTARIO NORTHERN CATTLE SALES NETWORK For sale results of the Northern Cattle Sales Network, cattlemen of Canada can call toll-free 1-888-461-9622 or check our Website at www.northerncattlesales.com for location details and sale results. We are expecting 15,000 head.

HOARD’S STATION Sponsor: Quinte Cattlemen’s Association Contact: Denton Meiklejohn 2530 Spring Brook Road Spring Brook, Ont. K0K 3C0 E-mail: [email protected] Phone/Fax: 613-395-2008 Sale week: 705-653-3660 Special Sales: Register with: www.CattleinMotion.com for on-line bidding Sept. 21, 11 a.m. – 700 yearlings/calves, 90% vaccinated Oct. 26, 11 a.m. – 700 yearlings/calves, 90% vaccinated Nov. 30, 11 a.m. – 700 head calves, 100% vaccinated Jan. 25, 2013, 11 a.m. – 800 head, 100% vaccinated



Mar. 15, 2013, 11 a.m. – 700 head, 90% vaccinated May. 3, 2013, 11 a.m. – 900 head, 100% vaccinated

Location: Hoard’s Station Sale Barn, 15 miles north of Belleville, halfway between Stirling and Campbellford on the county road

Peterborough/ Victoria Counties Sponsor: Peterborough-Victoria County Cattlemen’s Association Contact: Wayne Telford 2264 Chemory Road R.R. 1, Peterborough, Ont. K9J 6X2 Phone: 705-292-9531 Sale week: 705-439-4444 Special Sales: Oct. 3, 11 a.m. – 750 yearlings, 100% vaccinated Nov. 7, 11 a.m. – 1,000 head certified calves Nov. 21, 11 a.m. – 300 yearlings, 400 calves, 100% vaccinated Jan. 16, 2013, 11 a.m. – 600 head, 100% vaccinated Mar. 20, 2013, 11 a.m. – 600 head, 100% vaccinated May 1, 2013, 11 a.m. – 1,050 head, 100% vaccinated Location: Kawartha Lakes Co-op (KLC) Sales Barn, County Road #9, Woodville, Ont.

NOTES

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Thessalon Sponsor: Algoma Co-operative Livestock Sales Contact: Dennis Kirby R.R. 2, Iron Bridge, Ont. P0R 1H0 Phone: 705-842-5534 Sale Barn 705-842-2249 Special Sales: Sept. 18, 10 a.m. – 1,200 yearlings Oct. 20, 10 a.m. – 400 calves May 4, 2013, 11 a.m. – 200 head Location: East of Thessalon, off Highway 17 at Green Lane, at the Stockyards

Wiarton Sponsor: Grey-Bruce Livestock Co-operative Contact: Ron Cunningham 1153 Bruce County Road #9 R.R. 6, Wiarton, Ont. N0H 2T0 Phone: 519-534-2651 Sale day 519-534-0400 E-mail: [email protected] Special Sales: Thurs., Sept. 6, 10 a.m. – 1,500 yearlings Thurs., Oct. 25, 10 a.m. – 1,000 calves Thurs., May 2, 2013, 10 a.m. – 1,000 head Location: At the base of Bruce Peninsula on Hwy # 6, just south of Wiarton. Free transportation available from the airport at Wiarton.

BRUSSELS Brussels Livestock* Box 59, 42845 Newry Rd. Brussels, Ont. N0G 1H0 Phone: 519-887-6461 • Fax: 519-887-9449 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.brusselslivestock.ca Contact: Len Gamble................................. 519-887-6461 Kip Gamble................................................... 519-856-2538 Kevin McArter................................................ 519-357-0594 Mark Ferraro................................................. 519-492-0181 Regular Sales: Fri., 10 a.m. – Stocker calves & yearlings Tues., 9 a.m. – Fed cattle, bulls, cows Thurs., 8 a.m. – Bob calves, veal, lambs, goats, sheep Special Sales: Sat., Oct. 6, 10 a.m. – 4-H show & sale Fri., Oct. 26, 1 p.m. – Hereford influence sale Sat., Nov. 3, 11 a.m. – Bred cow sale Mon., Nov. 12, 10 a.m. – Huron County Beef Producers vaccinated calf & yearling sale, Hereford & Angus Influence sale Mon., Nov.26, 10 a.m. – Huron County Beef Producers vaccinated calf & yearling sale

Fri., Nov. 30, 1 p.m. – Angus influence sale

campbellford Community Livestock Exchange Hoard Station 2508 County Road 8 R.R. 5, Campbellford, Ont. K0L 1L0 Phone: 705-653-3660 • Fax: 705-653-4610 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.hoardstnsalebarn.ca Contact: David DeNure.............................. 705-653-3660 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 12 noon – Special sales by request Special Sales: 11 a.m., Quinte Cattlemen’s Stocker sales. Stocker sales will be on live video. Online bidders please register



Fri., Sept. 21 – Vaccinations preferred Fri., Oct. 26; Nov. 30; Jan. 25, 2013 – Vaccinated & catalogued Mar. 15, 2013 - Vaccinations preferred

CARGILL Cargill Auction Market Inc. Box 64, Cargill, Ont. N0G 1J0 Phone: 519-366-2214 • Fax: 519-366-2444 Contact: Alan Anstett................................ 519-366-2214 Calvin Anstett............................. 519-881-6623 Brian Kirkland............................. 519-797-1668 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 7 p.m. – Stockers & feeders Special Sales: Fri., Sept. 7; Oct. 5, 7 p.m. – Charolais & exotic cross yearlings, steers & heifers Fri., Sept. 28, 7 p.m. – All breed heifers Fri., Oct. 26; Nov. 2, 7 p.m. – Local calves

COBDEN Renfrew Pontiac Livestock 18156 Hwy. 17, R.R. 3, Cobden, Ont. K0J 1K0 Phone/Fax: 613-646-7335 Contact: Harry Dick................................... 613-649-2426 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 1 p.m. – All breeds

COOKSTOWN Ontario Stockyards Inc.* Box 402, Cookstown, Ont. L0L 1L0 Phone: 705-458-4000 • Fax: 705-458-4100 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.ontariostockyards.on.ca Contact: Wayne Small............................... 705-435-1423 Murray Morrison.......................... 416-233-1526 Brian Pascoe............................... 705-878-7026 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., 11 a.m. – Stockers & feeders Special Sales: Tues., Sept. 18; Oct. 2, 23; Thurs., Dec. 6, 11 a.m. – Yearlings Thurs., Oct. 18, 11 a.m. – Canadian Angus Certified calves/Canadian Hereford Association sale/ Ottawa Valley-Renfrew calves, yearlings Tues., Nov. 13, 27, 11 a.m. – Ontario Stockyards Inc. vaccinated sale Tues., Nov. 25, 11 a.m. – Annual Leeds/Grenville calf sale in conjunction with regular sale Fri., Nov. 23, 7 p.m. – Bred cow sale Ottawa Valley/Renfrew calve & yearling sale: Date to be announced

DENFIELD Denfield Livestock Exchange R.R. 2, Denfield, Ont. N0M 1P0 Phone: 519-666-1140 • Fax: 519-666-1143 Contact: Stan Rees................................... 519-871-5968 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 12 noon Special Sales: Sat., Sept. 22; Oct. 6, 20; Nov. 17, 11 a.m. – Stockers, cows, cow/calf pairs Sat., Nov. 3, 11 a.m. – Local calf sale

GREELY Ottawa Livestock Exchange Ltd.* Box 340, 1643 Sale Barn Road Greely, Ont. K4P 1N6

Phone: 613-821-2634 • Fax: 613-821-4594 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.ottawalivestockexchange.ca Contact: Steven Spratt.............................. 613-822-1351 Charles J. Menard....................... 819-983-1056 Robert/Richard/Denis.................. 613-821-2634 Regular Sales: Mon., 11 a.m. – Calves Mon., 1 p.m. – Slaughter cows & stockers Thurs., 11 a.m. – Calves, slaughter cows Thurs., 12:30 p.m. – Dairy cows Thurs., 2 p.m. – Stockers Special Sales:  For upcoming stocker & bred cows sales visit our website

Hanover Maple Hill Auctions Box 341, Hanover, Ont. N4N 3T2 Phone: 519-506-1400 • Fax: 519-506-1402 Contact: Andy McCulloch.......................... 519-379-1370 Regular Sales: Mon., 7 p.m. Special Sales: Every Mon. Aug. 20 through fall, 7 p.m. – Stocker sales Sat., Sept. 1, 1 p.m. – Ontario Autumn Angus Classic female sale Sun., Sept. 16, 1 p.m. – Ontario Autumn Simmental Classic female sale Sun., Sept. 23, 1 p.m. – Bluewater Angus female sale Sat., Sept. 29, 1 p.m. – Upin the Ante Charolais female sale Mon., Oct. 8, 22; Nov. 12, 7 p.m. – Local vaccinated calf sales

Listowel David Carson Farms & Auction Services Ltd.* R.R. 3, Listowel, Ont. N4W 3G8 Phone: 519-291-2049 • Fax: 519-291-5065 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.davidcarson.on.ca Contact: David/Brad Carson..................... 519-291-2049 Don Robertson............................ 519-291-8582 Bill Haalstra............................... 905-774-1739 Regular Sales: Sat., 11 a.m. – Stockers, cow/calf pairs, cows & bulls Special Sales: Contact for details Listowel Livestock Ltd.* R.R. 3, Listowel, Ont. N4W 3G8 Phone: 519-291-2200 • Fax: 519-291-1381 E-mail: [email protected] Contact: Grant Jackson............................. 519-291-4450 Bob Jackson................................ 519-291-3365 Graham Jackson......................... 519-291-4528 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 1 p.m. – All breeds Special Sales: Fri., Oct. 26, 12 noon – Local vaccinated calves

MILVERTON Parks Livestock of Canada LP 6 Spencer Street, Milverton, Ont. N0K 1M0 Phone: 519-595-8555 • Fax: 519-595-8552 Website: www.parkslivestock.com Contact: John Nicholson............................ 519-595-8555 Regular Sales: Every Mon., 12 noon – Farm fresh bob calves & veal

NEW LISKEARD



Temiskaming Livestock Exchange 883006 R.R. 3, New Liskeard, Ont. P0J 1P0 Phone: 705-647-5415 • Fax: 705-647-4411 Contact: Bill Stewart.........................................544-3508 Regular Sales: Every Mon., 2 p.m. – All classes of livestock Special Sales: Oct. 5, 19, 12 noon – Calves Oct. 26, 12 noon – Bred cows





Selby Selby Livestock and Auction Centre Box 453, Selby, Ont. K7R 3P5 Phone: 613-354-6260 • Fax: 613-354-5884 Website: www.selbyauctions.ca Contact: Bert Nibourg............................... 613-536-9157 Doug Lewis................................. 613-388-2355 Regular Sales: Every Mon., 1 p.m. – All classes of livestock

TALBOTVILLE Talbotville Livestock Exchange Limited 9959 Lyle Rd., Talbotville, Ont. N0L 2K0 Phone: 519-631-1850 • Fax: 519-631-8036 Contact: Matt Ferraro Regular Sales: Every Sat., 11 a.m. – All classes Special Sales: Stockers (call for details)

Tara Keady Livestock Market R.R. 4, Tara, Ont. N0H 2N0 Phone: 519-934-2339 • Fax: 519-934-2715 Website: www.keadylivestock.com Contact: Garry Kuhl................................... 519-934-1626 Ron Kuhl..................................... 519-477-4404 Scott Kuhl................................... 519-477-2339 Tom McNabb............................... 519-794-3072 Regular Fall Sales: 9 a.m. Every Tues., Sept. 14 to Oct. 12 – 1,200 to 1,500 head of yearling steers & heifers Sat., Oct 20 – Bruce Peninsula Calf Club sale (members only), 1,000 to 1,500 mainly Charolais age veried, vaccinated & presorted calves





Tues. Oct. 23. – Georgian Bay Charolais Calf Association sale (members only), 1,000 to 1,500 mainly Charolais, age verified, vaccinated, presorted calves Thurs., Oct. 25, – Bluewater Black Calf Club sale (members only), 1,000 to 1,500 mainly Black, age verified, vaccinated, presorted calves Sat., Oct. 27, – Central Calf Association sale (members only), 800 to 1,000 all breed age verified, vaccinated calves selling in owner lots Fri., Nov. 2, 16 – Local calves, preweaned or right off the cow in owner lots (1,000 to 1,500 per sale) Fri., Nov. 9 – 1,200 to 1,500 head of yearling steers & heifers Fri., Nov. 23, 5 p.m. – Bred cow & heifer sale Tues., Dec. 18, 2012 – Last sale of 2012 Tues.,Jan. 22, 2013 – First sale of 2013

VANKLEEK HILL Vankleek Hill Livestock Exchange* Box 134, 1239 Ridge Road • Vankleek Hill, Ont. K0B 1R0 Phone: 613-678-3008 Fax: 613-678-6017 E-mail: [email protected] Contact: Francois Tremblay....................... 514-233-9383 Regular Sales: Every Mon., 4 p.m.; Wed., 2 p.m. Special Sales: Last Wed. of the month 7 p.m. – Stockers & cows

WATERLOO Ontario Livestock Exchange Inc.* Box 443, Waterloo, Ont. N2J 4A9 Phone: 519-884-2082 • Fax: 519-884-0509 Website: www.olex.on.ca E-mail: [email protected] Contact: David Ropp................................. 519-749-5072 Brian Yost................................... 519-741-6205 Larry Witzel................................. 519-741-6333 Allen Colwell............................... 519-501-0147 Live Sales: Wed, 1 p.m. – Vaccinated Feeder Cattle Thurs., 11 a.m. – Regular stocker sale

Special Sales: Daily Internet Presort Sales & Direct from Ranch Sales, Contributing markets: Moose Jaw Swift Current Provost Lloydminster Vermilion Yorkton Maple Creek Meadow Lake Assiniboia Weyburn Mankota

WOODVILLE Kawartha Lakes Co-op 580 Woodville Road, R.R. 3, Woodville, Ont. K0M 2T0 Phone: 705-439-4444 • Fax: 705-439-3145 E-mail: [email protected] • Website: www.klcauction.ca Contact: Kevin Barker .............................. 705-878-2947 Jane Barker ................................ 705-439-4444 Regular Sales: Every Sat., 10 a.m. – Cull cows, bulls, finished cattle, veal calves, bob calves, replacement cattle, stocker cattle, bred cows & cows with calves Special Sales: Wed., Oct. 3; 11 a.m. – Peterborough/Victoria County Cattlemen’s sale Wed., Oct. 10, 24; Nov. 14; Dec. 5, 11 a.m. – Stocker sales Wed., Oct. 17, 11 a.m. – Eastern Angus stocker sale Wed., Nov. 7, 11 a.m. – Peterborough/ Victoria Cattlemen’s certified stocker sale (live video) Wed., Nov. 21 – Peterborough/ Victoria Cattlemen’s sale To consign to Peterborough/Victoria Cattlemen’s sales: Contact: Wayne Telford 705-292-9531 or 705-439-4444 on sale week For the Eastern Angus stocker sale: Contact: Kevin Barker ............................. 705-878-2947 Sun., Oct. 21, 1 p.m. – Autumn Harvest Angus purebred sale Sun., Nov. 18, 1 p.m. – Central Invitational Simmental purebred sale Wed., Nov. 28, 6 p.m. – Bred cow sale Jan. 16, 2013, 11 a.m. – Peterborough Victoria Cattlemen's stocker sale

QUEBEC The Feeder Calf Sales’ Agency 555, boul. Roland-Therrien, suite 305 Longueuil, Que. J4H 4G2 Phone: 450-679-0540 ext. 8891 Contact: Feeder calf development marketing officer, Eve Martin E-mail: [email protected]

BIC

St-Isidore-de-Dorchester, Que. G0S 2S0 Toll free 1-866-839-9475 • Phone: 418-882-6341 Special Sales: 9 a.m. Aug. 12 – 1,850 head Aug. 31 – 1,750 head Sept. 7 – 1,000 head Sept. 14 – 1,350 head Sept. 21 P – 1,000 head Sept. 28 – 1,250 head Oct.5 – 1,200 head Oct. 12 – 1,200 head Oct. 19 – 1,850 head Oct. 26 A – 1,850 head Nov. 2 – 1,650 head Nov. 9 – 1,850 head Nov. 16 – 1,400 head Nov. 23 – 1,850 head Nov. 30 – 1,850 head Dec. 7 – 1,850 head 2013 Special Sales: 9 a.m. Jan. 11 – 1,550 head Jan. 18 – 1,800 head Feb. 1 P – 1,850 head Feb. 8 A – 1,250 head Feb. 22 – 1,850 head Mar. 1 – 1,100 head Mar. 15 – 1,800 head Mar. 22 – 1,850 head Apr. 5 – 1,200 head Apr. 12 – 1,350 head Apr. 19 – 850 head Apr. 26 – 1,600 head May 3 – 1,000 head May 17 – 1,400 head May 24 – 1,850 head May 31 – 1,700 head

Coopérative des encans d’animaux du Bas-St-Laurent 3229, Route 132 Ouest, Bic, Que. G0L 1B0 Phone: 418-736-5788 Special Sales: 9:00 a.m. Aug. 23 – 800 head Sept. 20 P – 700 head Nov. 1P – 800 head 2013 Special Sales: 9:30 a.m. Jan. 16, – 700 head Mar. 14 – 700 head Apr. 18, – 700 head May 30, – 800 head

LA GUADELOUPE Marché d’animaux vivants Veilleux & Frères Inc. 1287, 14th Avenue, La Guadeloupe, Que. G0M 1G0 Phone: 418-459-6832 Special Sales: 9 a.m. Sept. 6P – 750 head Oct. 4 – 800 head Oct. 24A – 1,100 head Nov. 28 – 650 head 2013 Special Sales: 10 a.m. Jan. 17 – 1,150 head Feb. 21 – 650 head Apr. 25 – 550 head

SAWYERVILLE Encan Sawyerville Inc. 420, Route 253, Cookshire, Que. J0B 1M0 Phone: 819-849-3606 • 819-875-3577 Special Sales: 9 a.m. Aug. 30 – 1,100 head Sept. 13P – 800 head Sept. 27C – 1,000 head Oct. 11, P – 950 head Oct. 25 A – 1,500 head Nov. 8 – 1,500 head Nov. 22 – 1,500 head Nov. 29 – 800 head Dec. 6 – 1,150 head 2013 Special Sales: 9 a.m. Jan. 10 – 1,500 head Jan.31 P – 1,000 head Feb. 7 A – 1,100 head Mar. 21 – 1,300 head Apr. 11 – 1,150 head May 2 – 900 head May 23 – 1,200 head

ST-ISIDORE Réseau Encans Québec 2020, Rang de la Rivière

NOTES

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C A P P

Charolais special sale Angus special sale Pfizer special sales Pfizer special sale

NEW BRUNSWICK FLORENCEVILLE Carleton Co-op Sales Barn Florenceville, N.B. E7L 3G2 Phone: 506-392-5587 Contact: Carvell Crandlemire ..................... 506-375-8161 Regular Sales: Every Mon., 12 noon

SUSSEX Sussex and Studholm Agric. Soc. Auction Barn P.O. Box 5063, Sussex, N.B. E4E 5L2 Phone: 506-432-1841 • Fax: 506-432-1825 Regular Sales: Every other Wed., 11:30 p.m. – All breeds Feeder & stock cow sales start at 11:30 a.m. Call for details

NOVA SCOTIA TRURO Atlantic Stockyards Box 293, Truro, N.S. B2N 5C1 Phone: 902-893-9603 • Fax: 902-893-4483 Contact: Sean Firth .................................. 902-670-5999 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., 1 p.m. – All classes of livestock Fall Feeder Sales: 10 a.m. Sat., Sept. 15; Oct. 13; Nov. 10; Dec. 1 Special sales: Contact for details *2012 member of the Livestock Markets Association of Canada (LMAC)

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A LA-200 NEO-SULFALYTE OXYMYCINE LA OXYMYCINE LP PEN-AQUEOUS ALVERIN DECTOMAX VALBAZEN ENVIRACOR J-5 NOVODRY PLUS ORBESEAL PIRSUE SPECIAL FORMULA 17900 CE SYNOVEX H SYNOVEX PLUS SYNOVEX S CIDR 330 CIDR 1380 FACTREL LUTALYSE BOVI-SHIELD GOLD 5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD F P5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP 5+L5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP R 4+VL5 CATTLEMASTER GOLD FP 5 INFORCE 3 LEPTOFERM 5 ONE SHOT RESVAC 4/SOMUBAC SCOURGUARD 4KC SOMUBAC SPIROVAC TSV-2 ULTRABAC-7/SOMUBAC ULTRACHOICE 7 IBITANE KOPERTOX NEWCELLS OXY LA 300 OXYTOCIN PREDEF REVIBE REVIBE H.E. 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A180 CALFSPAN DRAXXIN EXCEDE 200 EXCENEL RTU INE LP PEN-AQUEOUS ALVERIN DECTOMAX VALBAZEN ENVIRACOR J-5 NOVODRY PLUS ORBESEAL PIRSUE SPECIAL FORMULA 17900 FORTE SPECTRAMAST DC SPECTRAMAST LC SYN 0 CIDR 1380 FACTREL LUTALYSE BOVI-SHIELD GOLD 5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD F P5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP 5+L5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP 5+VL5 BOVI-SHIELD IBR/PI3 CALF-GUARD CATTLEMA 3 LEPTOFERM 5 ONE SHOT RESVAC 4/SOMUBAC SCOURGUARD 4KC SOMUBAC SPIROVAC TSV-2 ULTRABAC-7/SOMUBAC ULTRACHOICE 7 ULTRACHOICE 8 ULTRACHOICE 8 VIBRIN CALOXYTOCIN PREDEF REVIBE REVIBE H.E. A180 CALFSPAN DRAXXIN EXCEDE 200 EXCENEL RTU EXCENEL LIQUAMYCIN LA-200 NEO-SULFALYTE OXYMYCINE LA OXYMYCINE LP PEN-AQU ESEAL PIRSUE SPECIAL FORMULA 17900 FORTE SPECTRAMAST DC SPECTRAMAST LC SYNOVEX C SYNOVEX CHOICE SYNOVEX H SYNOVEX PLUS SYNOVEX S CIDR 330 CIDR 1380 FAC D GOLD FP 5+L5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP 5+VL5 BOVI-SHIELD IBR/PI3 CALF-GUARD CATTLEMASTER 4+L5 CATTLEMASTER 4+VL5 CATTLEMASTER GOLD FP 5 INFORCE 3 LEPTOFERM 5 ON SV-2 ULTRABAC-7/SOMUBAC ULTRACHOICE 7 ULTRACHOICE 8 ULTRACHOICE 8 VIBRIN CAL-NATE 23 DYSTOSEL FLUNIXIN HIBITANE KOPERTOX NEWCELLS OXY LA 300 OXYTOCIN PRE EXCENEL LIQUAMYCIN LA-200 NEO-SULFALYTE OXYMYCINE LA OXYMYCINE LP PEN-AQUEOUS ALVERIN DECTOMAX VALBAZEN ENVIRACOR J-5 NOVODRY PLUS ORBESEAL PIRSUE S EX C SYNOVEX CHOICE SYNOVEX H SYNOVEX PLUS SYNOVEX S CIDR 330 CIDR 1380 FACTREL LUTALYSE BOVI-SHIELD GOLD 5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD F P5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP 5+L5 BO R 4+L5 CATTLEMASTER 4+VL5 CATTLEMASTER GOLD FP 5 INFORCE 3 LEPTOFERM 5 ONE SHOT RESVAC 4/SOMUBAC SCOURGUARD 4KC SOMUBAC SPIROVAC TSV-2 ULTRABAC-7/SOM 3 DYSTOSEL FLUNIXIN HIBITANE KOPERTOX NEWCELLS OXY LA 300 OXYTOCIN PREDEF REVIBE REVIBE H.E. A180 CALFSPAN DRAXXIN EXCEDE 200 EXCENEL RTU EXCENEL LIQUAMY LVERIN DECTOMAX VALBAZEN ENVIRACOR J-5 NOVODRY PLUS ORBESEAL PIRSUE SPECIAL FORMULA 17900 FORTE SPECTRAMAST DC SPECTRAMAST LC SYNOVEX C SYNOVEX CHOIC LYSE BOVI-SHIELD GOLD 5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD F P5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP 5+L5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP 5+VL5 BOVI-SHIELD IBR/PI3 CALF-GUARD CATTLEMASTER 4+L5 CATTLEMASTER RESVAC 4/SOMUBAC SCOURGUARD 4KC SOMUBAC SPIROVAC TSV-2 ULTRABAC-7/SOMUBAC ULTRACHOICE 7 ULTRACHOICE 8 ULTRACHOICE 8 VIBRIN CAL-NATE 23 DYSTOSEL FLUNIX REVIBE H.E. A180 CALFSPAN DRAXXIN EXCEDE 200 EXCENEL RTU EXCENEL LIQUAMYCIN LA-200 NEO-SULFALYTE OXYMYCINE LA OXYMYCINE LP PEN-AQUEOUS ALVERIN DECTOMAX ORMULA 17900 FORTE SPECTRAMAST DC SPECTRAMAST LC SYNOVEX C SYNOVEX CHOICE SYNOVEX H SYNOVEX PLUS SYNOVEX S CIDR 330 CIDR 1380 FACTREL LUTALYSE BOVI-SHIE IELD GOLD FP 5+VL5 BOVI-SHIELD IBR/PI3 CALF-GUARD CATTLEMASTER 4+L5 CATTLEMASTER 4+VL5 CATTLEMASTER GOLD FP 5 INFORCE 3 LEPTOFERM 5 ONE SHOT RESVAC 4/SOMU C ULTRACHOICE 7 ULTRACHOICE 8 ULTRACHOICE 8 VIBRIN CAL-NATE 23 DYSTOSEL FLUNIXIN HIBITANE KOPERTOX NEWCELLS OXY LA 300 OXYTOCIN PREDEF REVIBE REVIBE H.E. A LA-200 NEO-SULFALYTE OXYMYCINE LA OXYMYCINE LP PEN-AQUEOUS ALVERIN DECTOMAX VALBAZEN ENVIRACOR J-5 NOVODRY PLUS ORBESEAL PIRSUE SPECIAL FORMULA 17900 CE SYNOVEX H SYNOVEX PLUS SYNOVEX S CIDR 330 CIDR 1380 FACTREL LUTALYSE BOVI-SHIELD GOLD 5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD F P5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP 5+L5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP R 4+VL5 CATTLEMASTER GOLD FP 5 INFORCE 3 LEPTOFERM 5 ONE SHOT RESVAC 4/SOMUBAC SCOURGUARD 4KC SOMUBAC SPIROVAC TSV-2 ULTRABAC-7/SOMUBAC ULTRACHOICE 7 IBITANE KOPERTOX NEWCELLS OXY LA 300 OXYTOCIN PREDEF REVIBE REVIBE H.E. A180 CALFSPAN DRAXXIN EXCEDE 200 EXCENEL RTU EXCENEL LIQUAMYCIN LA-200 NEO-SULFA VALBAZEN ENVIRACOR J-5 NOVODRY PLUS ORBESEAL PIRSUE SPECIAL FORMULA 17900 FORTE SPECTRAMAST DC SPECTRAMAST LC SYNOVEX C SYNOVEX CHOICE SYNOVEX H SYNO LD GOLD 5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD F P5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP 5+L5 BOVI-SHIELD GOLD FP 5+VL5 BOVI-SHIELD IBR/PI3 CALF-GUARD CATTLEMASTER 4+L5 CATTLEMASTER 4+VL5 CATTLE

PEACE OF MIND

WITH PFIZER’S COMPLETE LINE OF CATTLE PRODUCTS

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