Request for Proposals


Feb 27, 2014 - Applications Portfolio Management and. Support. Application .... Evaluation. This Section provides information regarding the evaluation...

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Issue Date: February 27, 2014

Request for Proposals ________________________________

City of Minneapolis Information Technology

RFP for Outsourced IT Services February 27, 2014

Proposals Due by: 1:00 p.m. CT April 24, 2014

Issue Date: February 27, 2014

Table of Contents 1.

OVERVIEW ........................................................................................................................................................1 1.1 PURPOSE OF THIS RFP......................................................................................................................................1 1.2 SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES ................................................................................................................................1 1.3 PRINCIPAL CONTACT AND INFORMATION REQUESTS .......................................................................................1 1.4 PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE ..........................................................................................................................2 1.5 OVERVIEW OF THE SCOPE OF SERVICES AND THE CITY'S DELIVERY STRATEGY ..............................................2 1.6 OBTAINING DETAILED SCOPE MODELS FOR USE IN SUPPLIER PROPOSAL ........................................................5 1.7 OBTAINING ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR USE IN SUPPLIER PROPOSAL. .....................................................6 1.8 STRUCTURE OF RFP .........................................................................................................................................6 2. BACKGROUND INFORMATION REGARDING THE CITY OF MINNEAPOLIS .................................8 2.1 OVERVIEW OF THE CITY OF MINNEAPOLIS.......................................................................................................8 2.2 OVERVIEW OF THE CITY'S GOVERNMENT ...................................................................................................... 13 2.3 OVERVIEW OF THE CITY'S OPERATING STRUCTURE ....................................................................................... 13 2.4 CHARTER DEPARTMENTS ............................................................................................................................... 14 2.5 MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENTS ...................................................................................................................... 16 3. AS-IS IT ENVIRONMENT DESCRIPTION ................................................................................................. 17 3.1 VISION ........................................................................................................................................................... 17 3.2 IT ORGANIZATION ......................................................................................................................................... 17 3.3 AS IS DELIVERY MODEL ................................................................................................................................ 18 3.4 TECHNOLOGY HIGHLIGHTS ............................................................................................................................ 19 3.5 IN-FLIGHT PROJECT HIGHLIGHTS................................................................................................................... 19 3.6 LOCATIONS .................................................................................................................................................... 21 3.7 SERVICE DESK ............................................................................................................................................... 21 3.8 SERVERS AND STORAGE................................................................................................................................. 21 3.9 APPLICATIONS, DATABASES AND SOFTWARE ................................................................................................ 22 3.10 CLIENT COMPUTING .................................................................................................................................... 22 3.11 "SANDBOX" ENVIRONMENT ......................................................................................................................... 23 3.12 NETWORK .................................................................................................................................................... 24 3.13 DATA CENTERS ............................................................................................................................................ 28 4. SOLUTION OBJECTIVES, CONSTRAINTS, TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS AND SOLUTION DESIGN CRITERIA ................................................................................................................................................. 28 4.1 OBJECTIVES ................................................................................................................................................... 28 4.2 CONSTRAINTS ................................................................................................................................................ 30 4.3 TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS AND SOLUTION DESIGN CRITERIA .................................................................... 31 5. PROPOSAL RESPONSE ................................................................................................................................. 35 5.1 COVER LETTER .............................................................................................................................................. 36 5.2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY................................................................................................................................... 36 5.3 SUPPLIER COMPANY OVERVIEW .................................................................................................................... 37 5.4 RESPONSE TO THE CITY'S OBJECTIVES, CONSTRAINTS AND TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS/SOLUTION DESIGN CRITERIA ................................................................................................................................................................. 37 5.5 SCOPE ............................................................................................................................................................ 37 5.6 SOLUTION DESIGN ......................................................................................................................................... 38 5.7 TRANSITION & TRANSFORMATION................................................................................................................. 38 5.8 PERFORMANCE MODEL TERM SHEET............................................................................................................. 38 5.9 PRICING MODEL............................................................................................................................................. 39 5.10 TERMS AND CONDITIONS ............................................................................................................................. 39 5.11 REFERENCES ................................................................................................................................................ 39 5.12 SUPPLIER’S DUE DILIGENCE REQUIREMENTS .............................................................................................. 40 5.13 SUPPLIER FINANCIAL INFORMATION ............................................................................................................ 40 5.14 SMALL AND UNDERUTILIZED BUSINESS PROGRAM...................................................................................... 40 5.15 OTHER (OPTIONAL) ..................................................................................................................................... 40 6. INSTRUCTIONS ON RFP PROCESS ........................................................................................................... 41 6.1 PROPOSAL SUBMISSION ................................................................................................................................. 41 6.2 SUPPLIER PRESENTATIONS ............................................................................................................................. 42 6.3 DOWNSELECTION; COMPETITIVE NEGOTIATIONS AND MUTUAL DUE DILIGENCE ......................................... 43

Issue Date: February 27, 2014

6.4 CITY'S RIGHTS; REJECTION OF PROPOSALS .................................................................................................... 44 6.5 MODIFICATION OR TERMINATION OF RFP PROCESS ...................................................................................... 44 6.6 SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION ...................................................................................................................... 44 6.7 NO REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES ....................................................................................................... 44 6.8 PROPOSAL PREPARATION COSTS ................................................................................................................... 45 7. EVALUATION .................................................................................................................................................. 45 8. LIST OF ATTACHMENTS AND EXHIBITS ............................................................................................... 45 8.1 ATTACHMENT A: NON-DISCLOSURE AGREEMENTS ...................................................................................... 45 8.2 ATTACHMENT B: AS-IS ENVIRONMENT INFORMATION ................................................................................. 45 8.3 ATTACHMENT C: CITY POLICIES/CERTAIN REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS ................................................... 45 8.4 ATTACHMENT D: PROPOSAL DOCUMENTS/TEMPLATES ................................................................................ 45 8.5 ATTACHMENT E: SUPPLIER QUESTIONS TEMPLATE ....................................................................................... 46 8.6 ATTACHMENT F: SCOPE MODELS (AVAILABLE PURSUANT TO SECTION 1.6) ................................................. 46

Issue Date: February 27, 2014

1.

OVERVIEW 1.1

Purpose of this RFP The City of Minneapolis, Minnesota (the "City") is issuing this RFP for the outsourcing of IT services more fully described in this document (the “Services”). The City seeks comprehensive, responsive proposals from the recipient of this RFP ("Supplier") and other select organizations believed to have the capability and capacity to satisfy the City’s complex requirements and a serious interest in providing the Services. This RFP provides information on City and the Services, and instructions for the preparation and submission by Supplier of a proposal to provide the Services (the “Proposal”).

1.2

Schedule of Activities The City has developed an estimated timeline for this Initiative. As a result, the City requests that Supplier make a dedicated team available to participate in the Proposal development and evaluation processes as necessary to participate in the activities and meet the deadlines provided in the table below (which are subject to change in City's discretion):

Activity Publish RFP Pre-Proposal Conference Supplier Questions Submission City Response to Questions Proposal Submission Deadline Begin Supplier Presentations Begin Mutual Due Diligence (the City and Supplier), Competitive Negotiations Selection of Preferred Supplier(s) Contract(s) Execution; Begin Transition

Date February 27, 2014 March 19, 2014 March 21, 2014 March 31, 2014 1:00 p.m. CT on April 24, 2014 Beginning the week of May 19, 2014 Beginning August 1, 2014 December 1, 2014 February 1, 2015

Several of the activities identified in the above table are described in more detail in Section 6. 1.3

Principal Contact and Information Requests (a)

Supplier's primary interface with the City will be Robert Arko (the "Principal Contact") who will act as the City’s designated representative for the Initiative. Prospective responders shall direct any inquiries/questions in writing only to: [email protected] Supplier should direct all inquires to the Principal Contact.

(b)

The Principal Contact is the only individual who can be contacted regarding the Initiative before proposals are submitted. The Principal Contact cannot vary the terms of the RFP. Supplier should not, under any circumstances, contact any City personnel (including senior City management or City employees with whom Supplier has an existing business or personal relationship) to discuss this RFP without the Principal Contact’s prior written consent. Utmost discretion is expected of Supplier and all other RFP recipients. Any recipient attempting to circumvent this process risks elimination from further participation in the RFP process.

(c)

All inquiries shall be made using the template provided at Attachment E (Supplier Questions Template), and shall be sent via email to the Principal

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Issue Date: February 27, 2014

Contact no later than the date set forth in Section 1.2 for "Supplier Questions Submission". Such emails should be sent with the subject heading: “[Your company’s name] – Initial Questions, City of Minneapolis Sourcing Initiative 2014 RFP. (d)

1.4

Responses to the Questions are expected to be provided by the date set forth in Section 1.2 for "City Response to Questions", and will be posted on the City’s RFP website at: http://www.minneapolismn.gov/finance/procurement/rfp.

Pre-Proposal Conference A pre-proposal conference will be held at 9:00 a.m. CT on March 19, 2014 at the Hennepin County Library-Downtown Minneapolis, Doty Board Room, 300 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55401. All potential suppliers are encouraged to attend this conference, although attendance is not mandatory for Supplier to submit a proposal. An audio option will also be made available during the conference should Suppliers choose to participate remotely. For more information about the audio option, please contact [email protected]

1.5

Overview of the Scope of Services and the City's Delivery Strategy (a)

(b)

At the highest level, the City is contemplating the sourcing of service delivery functions for the following service categories (each a "Service Category") (i)

data center/central computing (the "Computing Service Category");

(ii)

network (the "Network Service Category");

(iii)

service desk/client computing (the "Service Desk/Client Computing Service Category"); and

(iv)

managed security services (the "Managed Security Service Category").

The following is intended to provide a high-level overview of the scope of Services corresponding to each Service Category. (i)

(ii)

Computing Service Category (A)

Hosting data center services, including management and operations of data center facilities for the housing and operation of computing, storage, network, telecommunications, and ancillary equipment; and

(B)

Central computing services for server platforms (standalone servers, server frames, server farms, virtual instances), storage platforms, storage area networks, data restore technology, data replication technology, load balancing and other associated infrastructure located in a data center (either a primary hosting data center or the City Hall data center) to operate and maintain the server and storage infrastructure environment.

Network Services Category (A)

Network operation services for telecommunications equipment and telecommunications facilities (local, campus, metropolitan and wide area communications facilities are generally included); and

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(B) (iii)

(iv)

Network transport services for both data and voice environments (e.g., Ethernet connectivity, voice telephone service).

Service Desk/Client Computing Services Category (A)

Service desk services to serve as a single source to obtain help with problems or service requests (e.g., call center configuration with the options for clients to utilize self- service tools for help); and

(B)

End-to-end operation support and maintenance for personal computing, peripherals and supporting software.

Managed Security Service Category (A)

Expert security consulting, centralized event monitoring and incident management; and

(B)

Advanced threat management, vulnerability management, compliance monitoring, and remote security systems administration, support and maintenance.

The following diagram depicts a high level overview of the four Service Categories and the functions corresponding to each of them. Please note that above high-level description, and the diagram below, are intended to provide an introduction and high-level overview of the scope of the Services. Supplier is encourged to obtain a copy of the Scope Models (referenced in Section 1.6 below) for a more detailed and precise description of the scope of the Services. In the event of any conflict between this overview and the Scope Models, the Scope Models shall prevail.

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To Be Delivery Model (Tops Down View) City of Minneapolis Supplier 1 Supplier 2 Supplier 3 Supplier 4 Supported by Non IT Department IT Strategy & Management Customer Relations Enterprise Architecture Solution Requirements Domain Architecture / Standards Program Management (Project Intake), Project Management Capacity Management (Planning and Performance) Configuration Management, Release Management, Asset Management

Governance and Leadership

Services Management

Service Desk, Incident, Problem, Change Client Computing Premium Public Safety Vehicle Compute Voice Systems Service Delivery

Client Computing Standard Multi Cellular Device Function Support Voice/Contact Center Applications

Applications Portfolio Management and Support Application Development Public Works - Traffic Control, Parking

Managed Security Services ( Integrated Centralized Management and Monitoring ) Network - LAN, WAN, MAN

Public Works Water SCADA Network

Network Transport

Compute and Storage Platforms Primary Data Center (s) and Data Center Networks

City Hall Data Center Facility

(c)

The City contemplates sourcing these four Service Categories under a "best of breed" approach. Under this approach, the City prefers selection of a single preferred supplier to be responsible for the delivery of the corresponding Services for each Service Category (which may consist of a single supplier delivering these Services, or a single supplier acting as a prime contractor in concert with other supplier subcontractors to deliver such Services), but contemplates the possibility that different suppliers could be selected for different Service Categories, depending on the results of the City's evaluation. Accordingly, Supplier is invited to submit a proposal for any one or more of the Service Categories. In addition, while not the City's preferred approach, the City reserves the right to select more than one supplier for delivery of Services corresponding to a single Service Category, depending on the results of the City's evaluation.

(d)

With the above mentioned, the City is also contemplating sourcing the delivery of and use of IT service management tools and standard processes for use with the "best of breed" sourcing approach. The City’s preference is this approach would integrate the Service Categories and the City’s IT for critical service management process such as incident, problem, change, configuration management and capacity management.

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1.6

(e)

As further described in the RFP, the City is seeking for Supplier to propose an initial solution for the corresponding Services. However, apart from implementation of an agreed solution as part of Transition and Transformation, and as further described in the Scope Models, the City intends to retain responsibility for performing solution development from technical requirements on an ongoing basis. Nevertheless, the City expects to engage and collaborate with any ultimate Supplier(s) selected for Service delivery in order to perform such responsibility.

(f)

At the present time, the City has not yet determined its preferred strategy with respect to ownership and financial responsibility for assets to be used by the City and its clients in connection with the Services (e.g., servers, site routers, PCs), which the City believes may depend in part upon the ultimate solution selected (e.g., for the Computing Service Category, a traditional data center solution versus IaaS). Accordingly, the City has requested that the Supplier provide, as part of its Pricing Model proposal described more fully in Section 5.9, separate pricing for assets and Services. In no event shall the City procure solely hardware or physical assets from any supplier through this RFP, without the purchase of any associated services. Rather, the City contemplates either procuring services only, or services and assets owned by the Supplier on an integrated basis (or some combination of these alternatives).

Obtaining Detailed Scope Models for Use in Supplier Proposal (a)

While Section 1.2 of this RFP includes a high-level description of the scope of Services, a package of supplementary materials that more fully describes the scope of the Services (including identifying specific processes and elements comprising the Services) corresponding to each Service Category (the "Scope Models") is available to the Supplier. The Scope Models are set forth in a proprietary format made available by the City's advisor on this initiative, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP ("Pillsbury"). While obtaining the Scope Models is not required in order for Supplier to submit a Proposal, the City believes that Supplier will be at a significant disadvantage in its ability to understand the specificity of the scope of Services for each Service Category without use of the Scope Models. For clarity, in the event of a conflict between the high-level description of the scope of Services set forth in Section 1.2, the Scope Models shall take precedence and govern.

(b)

In order to obtain a copy of the Scope Model materials, Supplier must complete and execute the non-disclosure agreement with Pillsbury set forth in Attachment A-1 (Pillsbury Confidentiality and Non-Disclosure Agreement) (the "Pillsbury NDA"). Except for insertion of Supplier's name and address in the corresponding areas of the Pillsbury NDA, and signature by an authorized representative of Supplier, Supplier should not make any other changes to the Pillsbury NDA. Supplier should e-mail an executed, scanned original of the Pillsbury NDA with the e-mail subject line indicating Supplier's name as follows: "[insert supplier name] - Pillsbury NDA for City of Minneapolis RFP", to Mr. Sean Williamson, Associate, at [email protected], with a copy to Mr. Brian Bodor, Partner, at [email protected] Supplier's communication should specify the e-mail address to which Supplier would like the Scope Model materials provided. Upon receipt of an executed Pillsbury NDA without modification except as set forth above, within 3 days Pillsbury will provide electronically (a) a countersigned version of the Pillsbury NDA, and (b)

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Attachment F (Scope Models) to this RFP, which contains the Scope Models, as well as a brief overview of the format used to convey this information. 1.7

1.8

Obtaining Additional Information for Use in Supplier Proposal. (a)

To the extent that Supplier proposes to provide Services corresponding to the Network Service Category or the Managed Security Service Category, additional detailed information is available relating to the City's network environment and security environment, respectively.

(b)

To obtain this information, Supplier must complete and execute the nondisclosure agreement with the City as set forth in Attachment A-2 (City Confidentiality and Non-Disclosure Agreement) (the "City NDA"). Except for insertion of Supplier's name and address in the corresponding areas of the City NDA, and signature by an authorized representative of Supplier, Supplier should not make any other changes to the City NDA. Supplier should either e-mail a scanned original, or mail a hardcopy original, to Mr. Robert Arko, 310 4th Avenue South, Suite 400, Minneapolis, MN 55415 (e-mail [email protected]), specifying (A) the e-mail address to which Supplier would like the information materials provided, and (B) whether Supplier is requesting the additional information for the Network Service Category, the Managed Security Service Category, or both. Upon receipt of an executed City NDA without modification except as set forth above, within 3 days the City will provide electronically (a) a countersigned version of the non-disclosure agreement, and (b) Attachment B-1 (City Locations & Associated IT Equipment) and/or Attachment B-3 (Security Environment Information) to this RFP, as applicable.

Structure of RFP The remainder of the RFP is structured as follows: Contents Section 2

Section 3

Section 4

Section 5

Background Information Regarding the City of Minneapolis. This Section provides background information regarding the City of Minneapolis, including information relating the structure and organization of the City's government. As-Is IT Environment Description. This Section provides a description of City's current IT environment, referencing various asset, location, organizational and other information regarding the current IT environment. Solution Objectives, Constraints & Technical Requirements. This Section describes, in a non-prescriptive fashion, the objectives that the City is interested in achieving from Supplier’s solution, as well as certain constraints and technical requirements with which the Supplier's solution must comply. Proposal Response. This Section: • Provides a roadmap to the contents that are required to be included in Supplier’s Proposal. It describes the topics to be addressed and the character of information to be included; and • References Attachment D (Proposal Documents/Templates), which contains various documents and templates that Supplier must populate and return as part of its Proposal.

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Section 6 Section 7

Section 8

Instructions on RFP Process. This Section provides information and instructions regarding the RFP process, including activities and timelines following the Proposal submission from Supplier. Evaluation. This Section provides information regarding the evaluation of Supplier proposals. List of Attachments and Exhibits to RFP. This Section provides a table of contents for the various attachments and Exhibits to the RFP.

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2.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION REGARDING THE CITY OF MINNEAPOLIS 2.1

Overview of the City of Minneapolis Minneapolis combines the Dakota word for water ("minne") with the Greek word for city ("polis"), a fitting name for the City with 22 of Minnesota's 12,034 lakes. Minneapolis is renowned for combining the best of urban life with the neighborhoods and quality of life found in smaller towns. Residents enjoy exciting cultural and recreational opportunities in beautiful natural surroundings. (a)

History In the mid-17th Century, French explorers searching for the Northwest Passage were the first Europeans to visit the region. In the 1820s, at the confluence of the Minnesota and Mississippi rivers, soldiers from Fort Snelling constructed a saw-mill and a flour mill at the St. Anthony Falls. By the 1850s, the village of St. Anthony had been established on the east bank of the Mississippi and the village of Minneapolis on the west bank. The two towns were soon linked by a suspension bridge. Minneapolis' first volunteer fire company was organized in 1862, and the community was incorporated as a city in 1867. In 1872, Minneapolis and St. Anthony were united to form one city.

(b)

Location Minneapolis is the largest city in Minnesota and the center of finance, industry, trade and transportation for the Upper Midwest. At 44.58°–north latitude and 93.15°–west longitude, Minneapolis is 59 square miles (153 square kilometers), including 3.6 square miles (9.4 square kilometers) of inland water. It drapes along the banks of the nation’s largest river, the Mississippi.

(c)

Climate Minneapolis has an average summer temperature of 70° F, and an average winter temperature of 16° F. 1 Minneapolis has four distinct seasons, with moderate spring and fall weather. Summer is comfortable because lakes and trees serve as natural air conditioners. opulation Minneapolis is home to an estimated 393,000 people. Males and females each make up approximately 50% of the population. Children and youth under 18, seniors aged 65 and above, make up 20% and 8% of the population respectively. African Americans comprise 19% of the population, with Hispanics making up 11% of the population. People of American Indian and Alaska Native descent comprise 2% of the population and people of Asian ethnicity make up 6% of the population. People of another race, or those of two or more races, make up 4% of the population. 2

1 2

Source: Minnesota DNR, www.dnr.state.mn.us/faq/mnfacts/climate.html Source: US Census Bureau 2012 estimates, http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/27/2743000.html

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(d)

Economy

In the early years, Minneapolis’ economy was based on a booming lumber industry and the processing of Minnesota grain with the tremendous power-generating capabilities of St. Anthony Falls. Large flourmills along the river evolved into the international corporations of Pillsbury, Washburn Crosby (General Mills) and Cargill. In 2010, the ten largest Fortune 500 Companies headquartered in the metro area were as follows: 3

Abbott Northwestern Hospital

Employer United Health Group Target Best Buy CHS Super Valu 3M U.S. Bancorp General Mills Medtronic Land O'Lakes

Revenue $ Billions 110.6 73.3 45.1 40.6 36.1 29.9 22.2 16.7 16.5 14.1

As of the third quarter 2012, the City’s largest employment sectors were health care and social assistance (17%), professional and technical assistance (10%), educational service (9.6%), and finance and insurance (9.5%), and accommodation and food service (8%). The fastest growing employment sectors from first quarter of 2011 to first quarter of 2012 were real estate and rental and leasing, administrative and waste services, and accommodation and food services.4 With twenty-one accredited colleges and universities in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area, and four ABA-accredited law schools, the City’s highly educated workforce continues to be a driving force of a strong economy. The University of Minnesota’s highly acclaimed medical school, and the City’s seven hospitals, has made Minneapolis a leader in the medical field. Since 2009, the City’s unemployment rate has been falling. Details follow: 5

3

Source: Official Statement, November 1, 2013, City of Minneapolis for General Obligation Various Purpose Bond Series 2013 Source: “Minneapolis Trends” available at http://www.minneapolismn.gov/www/groups/public/@cped/documents/webcontent/wcms1p-100744.pdf 5 Source: Official Statement, November 1, 2013, City of Minneapolis for General Obligation Various Purpose Bond Series 2013 4

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Total Labor Force Employment Unemployment Unemployment rate

2008 215,673 204,704 10,969 4.4%

2009 217,941 201,774 16,167 7.4%

2010 218,733 204,234 14,499 6.6%

2011 214,254 201,281 12,973 6.1%

2012 212,979 201,016 11,963 5.6%

2013 216,257 205,487 10,770 5.0%

The City’s top ten payers of property taxes in 2010 follow: 6 Taxpayer Northern States Power Co. Target Corporation MB Mpls. 8th Street LLC NWC Limited Partnership Minneapolis 225 Holdings LLC SRI Ten Center LLC Wells Operating Partnership LP I First Minneapolis-Hines Co. Hilton Hotels Corp. Hines Global Reit 50 So. 6th St LLC Total

(e)

Type of Business Utilities Office Buildings and retail Office Buildings Commercial/Industrial Buildings Office Buildings Office Buildings and Residential Office Buildings Banks Hotel/Hospitality Office Buildings

Net Tax * Capacity

% of Total Net Tax Capacity

$6.4M $4.2M $3.6M $3.3 M

1.78% 1.12% 0.95% 0.88%

$3.2M $3.0M

0.87% 0.82%

$2.7 M $2.8M $2.4M $2.2M $33.9M

0.73% 0.71% 0.64% 0.59% 9.09%

Neighborhoods Minneapolis has 81 residential neighborhoods offering 177,309 residential housing units. 7 The City is well known for its concerned and active citizenry which has engaged in partnerships with government and business to improve neighborhoods and create economic opportunities. The City shares the nation’s current challenge to increase the number of affordable housing units and preserve housing stock in the face of foreclosures.

(f)

Downtown According to the City’s analysis of the data from the State of Minnesota, approximately 132,000 jobs were located in downtown Minneapolis as of 2010.8

6

lbid Source: Minneapolis Assessor, January 2012 8 Source: CPED analysis of DEED data as of 2010 7

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Second-story skyways keep downtown busy and thriving even on the coldest days. Nicollet Mall, a 12-block-long shopping area closed to automobile traffic and flanked by some of the nation's finest department stores and specialty stores is the retail heart of Minneapolis, with many stores located in Gaviidae Common, City Center, and the Crystal Court. (g)

The Arts Minneapolis is second only to New York City in per capita attendance at theater and arts events. Minneapolis has more than 30 theaters. The Guthrie Theater and the Children's Theatre Company are recognized as two of the country's best. In June of 2006, the Guthrie Theater celebrated the opening of its $125 million theater on the banks of the Mississippi River on the northeastern edge of downtown. The City also boasts two world-class art museums, the Minneapolis Institute of Art and the Walker Art Center, and is home to the internationally acclaimed Minnesota Orchestra. Neighborhood arts activities including festivals, galleries and events play a growing role in resident art participation.

(h)

Education The City offers several vocational training and specialty schools. The main campus of the University of Minnesota sits on the banks of the Mississippi just minutes from downtown. It is a major land-grant research institution with a long tradition of community and public service, and it ranks among the top 20 universities in the U.S. It is also one of the largest. In addition to the University of Minnesota, other institutions of higher education include Minneapolis Community and Technical College, Dunwoody Institute, Minneapolis College of Art and Design, Augsburg College, Metropolitan State University, the University of Saint Thomas, St. Mary’s University, the College of Saint Catherine, and Capella University.

(i)

The Washington Avenue Bridge crosses the Mississippi River and connects the University’s East and West Banks

Sports and Outdoor Recreation Many major league teams call Minnesota home. Fans can watch Major League Baseball’s Minnesota Twins in action at Target Field, located in the Warehouse District of downtown Minneapolis. When the National Football League’s Minnesota Vikings are in town, the Metrodome can seat 64,000 football enthusiasts. The new Vikings stadium will have a sitting capacity of 65,000 football fans (expandable to 73,000). The Minnesota Timberwolves of the National Basketball Association

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and the national champion Minnesota Lynx of the Women’s National Basketball Association play downtown in the Target Center. Minnesota’s National Hockey League team, the Wild, play in St. Paul. Minneapolis has the capacity to host large events at the City’s Convention Center.

Minneapolis residents not only watch sports, they participate actively. In 2008, Men’s Fitness magazine ranked Minneapolis number two on their top ten fittest cities list. Playing in summer softball leagues, golfing, jogging, swimming, playing tennis, biking or rollerblading around and sailing in the City's lakes are favorite pastimes. In 2008, Bicycling Magazine awarded Minneapolis #1 Bike City. The City’s Park and Recreation Board maintain 87 miles of walking and biking paths. The City also maintains sports fields, outdoor ice rinks, tennis courts, golf courses, and supervised beaches. In the winter, residents enjoy ice skating, ice fishing, skiing, and ice sailing. Early in Minneapolis' development, the land around five large lakes was dedicated to the public as parkland. With one acre of parkland for every 60 residents, outdoor recreation is an important part of life, and it is estimated that a City park is ready for fun no more than six to eight blocks from every home. (j)

Nationally Recognized Minneapolis has recently received national recognition as being a great place to visit, to live, run a business, and forge community connections. The following is a sample of some of the City’s recent honors: • • • • • • •

2011 Best city in the country for workers to find employment – Forbes Magazine 2011 Best Place to Live in a Big City Designed for Getting Outside – Men’s Journal Cleanest City in America 2010 – Travel and Leisure Magazine Third Best Market for Young Professionals 2010 – Forbes Magazine # 8 on America’s Best Cities List – Outside Magazine Minneapolis one of the “Best Places to Live in 2010” – Men’s Journal Minneapolis/Saint Paul Named Top Metro Area for Business – MarketWatch

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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Minneapolis Best City in the Country to Find Employment - Forbes Minneapolis Identified as the “Most Affordable Place to Live Well” – Forbes One of 2007’s Top Destinations – Frommer’s One of World’s Top Biking Cities – Travel + Leisure # 1 Bike City – Bicycling Magazine City of Minneapolis Received Gold Award for “Bike Friendly Business” – League of American Bicyclists # 4 City for Eating Smart, Being Fit, and Living Well – Cooking Light Minneapolis Named the Nation’s Second Fittest City – Men’s Fitness # 3 Best Cities for Singles – Forbes Magazine Most Literate City – Central Connecticut State University # 4 Smartest City in America – The Daily Beast # 2 City to Have a Baby – Fit Pregnancy Best Cities for Working Mothers – Forbes Magazine Minneapolis/Saint Paul Ranks in Top 10 Areas in the Nation for EnergyEfficient Buildings - EPA # 7 Sustainable City – Sustain Lane Minneapolis Cleanest City in the Country – Travel + Leisure Minneapolis One of the 10 Greenest Cities in the Nation – Move.com Minneapolis/Saint Paul Area Ranked Top in the Nation for Volunteering – National & Community Service # 1 National Night Out City of 2007 – National Association of Town Watch

For links to more information on many of these top rankings, visit www.minneapolismn.gov/visitors/. 2.2

2.3

Overview of the City's Government (a)

The City is a municipal corporation governed by a Mayor–Council form of government. It was incorporated in 1867 and adopted a Charter on November 2, 1920. Thirteen City Council Members from individual wards and the Mayor are elected for terms of four years. There is no term limit on these positions. The Mayor and City Council are jointly responsible for the adoption of the annual budget and a five-year capital improvement program. As required by Charter, the Mayor is responsible for preparing an annual operating and capital budget recommendation for the City Council’s consideration. The Mayor has veto power, which the Council may override with a vote of nine members.

(b)

The City Finance Officer is charged with maintaining and supervising the various accounts and funds of the City as well as several boards and commissions. In addition, the City Budget Director is charged with assisting the Mayor, City Council and City departments in preparing the City's annual capital and operating budget. The City Finance Officer reports to the City Coordinator, who is appointed by the Mayor and serves as chief administrative officer of the City.

(c)

The City includes organizations for which the primary government is financially accountable and for which the nature and significance of their relationships with the primary government are such that exclusion could cause the City's budget report to be misleading or incomplete.

Overview of the City's Operating Structure Under the Mayor and City Council, the City Government is organized into specific

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departments. These departments fall into one of two categories:

2.4

(a)

Charter departments established in the City Charter having a direct reporting relationship to the Mayor and City Council; and

(b)

Management departments supporting the business operations of the enterprise and reporting to the City Coordinator.

Charter Departments The head (director) of each of the following charter departments is nominated by the Mayor and appointed to a two-year term by the executive committee, subject to ratification by the full City Council. (a)

City Assessor: The City Assessor classifies and values all property within the city in an accurate, ethical, equitable, and defensible manner as prescribed by state law.

(b)

City Attorney: The City Attorney is the legal advisor and attorney for the Mayor and City Council and leads the team of in-house attorneys in representing and defending the interests of the City. The City Attorney’s Office encompasses criminal and civil divisions: the criminal division prosecutes misdemeanor, gross misdemeanor, and petty misdemeanor crimes within the city; the civil division

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provides legal services to elected officials, departments, and boards and commissions. (c)

City Clerk: The City Clerk is the clerical officer and parliamentarian of the City Council, the chief elections official of the city, and custodian of the records of the City of Minneapolis.

(d)

City Coordinator: The City Coordinator is the chief operations officer, acts as principal policy advisor to the Mayor and Council, and provides leadership for management functions across the enterprise.

(e)

Civil Rights: The Department of Civil Rights enforces non-discrimination policies through its Complaint Investigations, Contract Compliance, and Office of Police Conduct Review units. These units manage small and underutilized business programs, prevailing wage programs, and promote understanding of civil rights among residents, businesses, and government.

(f)

Community Planning & Economic Development: CPED works to grow a sustainable city through its major business lines: Community Planning, Economic Policy & Development, Workforce Development, Housing Policy & Development, and Planning & Development Services. CPED guides and develops these focus areas to achieve a thriving community and economy.

(g)

Fire: The Minneapolis Fire Department provides emergency response to structure fires, medical emergencies, emergencies on lakes and rivers, technical and hazardous materials crises, and natural disasters citywide. The Fire Department also provides prevention education and outreach throughout the community.

(h)

Health: The Health Department, under the direction of the Health Commissioner, promotes healthy residents, communities, and environments by focusing on modifying social conditions and physical environments. Additionally, the Health Department protects the public’s health through disease prevention and control, and emergency preparedness.\

(i)

Internal Audit: The Internal Audit Department, with oversight provided by the Audit Committee, provides internal audit services to the City of Minneapolis and functions in accordance with the International Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing set by the Institute of Internal Auditors.

(j)

Police: The Police Department, through its Patrol Bureau, Investigations Bureau, and Professional Standards Bureau is responsible for keeping the peace and protecting property through patrols, investigations and community interaction.

(k)

Public Works: Public Works provides critical infrastructure and is responsible for promoting health and safety by proving water, collecting and disposing of solid waste, recycling and problem materials. Additionally, Public Works serves the community be offering residents a variety of transportation options throughout the city.

(l)

Regulatory Services: Regulatory Services is charged with protecting the health, safety and welfare of Minneapolis residents through a program of regulation, inspection, and enforcement of laws and ordinances pertaining to housing inspection, fire inspections, traffic control, problem properties, and animal care and control.

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2.5

Management Departments The head (director) of each of the following departments is appointed to an undefined term by the City Coordinator, and each carries the concurrent title “Assistant City Coordinator” in addition to the title each executive bears for direct supervision of his or her department. For example, the director of the Finance & Property Services Department is the Assistant City Coordinator and Chief Financial Officer (Director of Finance & Property Services Department). (a)

Communications: The Communications Department leads communication planning and execution for the enterprise, including elected officials and departments. Additionally, Communications manages the City's cable franchise and produces and broadcasts online and cable content.

(b)

Convention Center: The Convention Center coordinates in-house departments and contracted services for major event activities including production and setup. Additionally, the Convention Center ensures sufficient building, safety, and capital resources are maintained along with sales and marketing services for the facility.

(c)

Customer Service (Minneapolis 311): Minneapolis 311 provides a centralized point-of-contact for the City Government and functions as the primary in-take agency for service requests, referrals, and general information for the City of Minneapolis.

(d)

Emergency Communications (911): The 911 Emergency Dispatch Center receives and processes 911 and 10-digit emergency calls, dispatches police and fire response, and serves as the warning point for the city.

(e)

Emergency Management: The Office of Emergency Management protects the people who live, work and play in the City of Minneapolis by building, sustaining, and improving the capability to mitigate against, prepare for, respond to, and recover from threatened or actual disasters, whether natural or man-made, and acts of terrorism.

(f)

Finance & Property Services: The Finance and Property Services Department provides essential financial services, resource and asset management, and guides policy and management decisions to ensure the City’s lasting vibrancy and financial strength.

(g)

Human Resources: The Human Resources Department provides human resource solutions in alignment with the vision and goals of the enterprise. Areas of focus include workforce recruitment and retention, health care and wellness programs, talent management and workforce planning. In addition, the department works to ensure workforce practices are in alignment with Civil Service Commission rules and local, state and federal employment laws.

(h)

Information Technology: The Information Technology Department manages the City's computing architecture, installation, configuration, administration, and maintenance activities. Additionally, IT manages the City's network including data, voice, and video services. Finally, IT manages and maintains the databases necessary to store the electronic data used by the City.

(i)

Intergovernmental Relations: The Intergovernmental Relations Department effectively represents the City of Minneapolis and its policy priorities to its

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partners at multiple levels of government to achieve legislative and program success. (j)

3.

Neighborhood And Community Relations: The Neighborhood and Community Relations Department is charged with strengthening our City’s quality of life through vigorous community participation, resident involvement in neighborhood and community organizations, and supporting clearly defined links between the City, City services and neighborhood and community

AS-IS IT ENVIRONMENT DESCRIPTION This Section contains a description of City’s current "as is" IT environment, and related data, metrics and other information. The information in this Section 3 is intended as background to aid Supplier in (a) evaluating the City's objectives, constraints, technical requirements, and solution design criteria for the "to be" environment, and the scope of the City’s IT outsourcing initiative (the “Initiative”), and (b) in preparing its Proposal in response to this RFP accordingly. For clarity, this Section is intended only to describe the current IT environment, and not to reflect the aspects desired by the City for the "to be" environment, which are described in Section 4. 3.1

Vision The City of Minneapolis IT vision centers on empowering the workforce and two-way public communication. The expectations of the IT department are to add value to the City's workers and residents through the delivery of reliable and cost-effective information services.

3.2

IT Organization (a)

Objectives and Principles The primary objective of the City's IT organization is to add value to the City's workers and residents through the delivery of reliable and effective information services with the following emphasis:

(b)

(i)

Strive to maximize the productivity of the City's workers and residents;

(ii)

Be flexible and adaptive to changing needs;

(iii)

Tap into new capabilities and innovations;

(iv)

Provide quality and timely service;

(v)

Control costs and complexity; and

(vi)

Attract and retain a highly skilled and effective staff.

Organization The current IT organization consists of approximately 60 City employees with deep knowledge of the City departments and technology to support the goals and objectives of the City. IT operations for client computing, network, servers, storage, and data center are currently sourced to a single third-party supplier, Unisys, who utilizes a combination of dedicated and pooled resources to support the City's IT infrastructure and operations. IT Operations for voice systems and applications are supported by City employees and supplemented by a maintenance vendor. From time to time the City supplements its IT workforce by engaging other third parties on an ad hoc basis. The City's IT functional organization is along the following areas:

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3.3

(i)

Enterprise Application Support

(ii)

Business Application Maintenance

(iii)

Solution Development/Engineering

(iv)

Help Desk Services

(v)

Client Services/Support

(vi)

Security

(vii)

Network Management and Support

(viii)

Data Center Management and Support

(ix)

Architecture

(x)

Business Analysis

(xi)

Telecom Services

(xii)

Vendor Management

(xiii)

Project Management

(xiv)

End-Point Device Management

(xv)

Digital Inclusion

As Is Delivery Model The following diagram is a high-level description of the current allocation of responsibility among the City and third parties for service delivery. For clarity, this diagram depicts the "as is", and not the "to be", allocation of responsibility.

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As Is Delivery Model (Tops Down View) City of Minneapolis Unisys City of Minneapolis and Unisys Black Box Niche Provider (Specialty or Application) CenturyLink Supported by Non IT Department (Water, Traffic Control, Parking) IT Strategy & Management Customer Relations Enterprise Architecture Solution Requirements Domain Architecture / Standards Program Management (Project Intake), Project Management IT Service Management (Incident, Problem, Configuration, Change, Release and Asset Management)

Governance and Leadership

Services Management

Client Computing VIP Public Safety Vehicle Compute Voice Systems Maintenance

Client Computing Standard Services

Applications Portfolio Management and Support

Cellular Application Development Device Voice System Voice/Contact Public Works - Traffic Public Works (SCADA) Administration/Telecom Center Control, Parking Multi Function Devices

Service Delivery

Network - LAN, MAN, WAN, Security Operations Compute and Storage Platforms Data Center (s) and Data Center Network

City Hall Data Center Facility

Network Transport

3.4

Technology Highlights Key technology aspects of the City's IT environment include the following:

3.5

(a)

Metropolitan Optical Ethernet (MOE) connecting 20 locations and direct fiber connectivity to 14 sites;

(b)

Wireless intranet and extranet;

(c)

Over 400 business applications;

(d)

Voice over IP and data network consolidation;

(e)

311 and Utility Billing call centers handling over 45,000 calls per month;

(f)

911 emergency call centers handling over 50,000 calls per month; and

(g)

Public safety systems that support police, fire, and EMS mobile workforces; cellular broadband and Wi-Fi technologies are leveraged for network connectivity.

In-Flight Project Highlights As Minneapolis continues to grow, so does the demand for technology changes to empower the workforce and provide secure, real-time data. In a typical year, IT drives approximately 145 enterprise and departmental projects at a total spend of approximately $7.3M. These projects each range from approximately $20,000 to $1.2M in spend. The following are in-flight enterprise projects as of the date of this RFP:

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(a)

Refresh (i)

(b)

(c)

Network Infrastructure Refresh – Objective is to maintain the currency and stability of critical network equipment (ongoing). Current projections indicate the following end of service dates for network equipment: •

2016: 150



2017: 0



2018: 20



2019: 24



2020: 12



2021: 49

(ii)

Desktop Refresh – Objective is to maintain the currency and stability of client computing devices (ongoing)

(iii)

Server Refresh – Objective is to maintain the currency and stability of server hardware (ongoing). The current equipment in the City Hall Data Center is less than one year old.

Security (i)

Secure web gateway – Adoption of enhanced internet security protection and content filtering tool (expected to be completed 12/31/14)

(ii)

Forefront Identity Management (FIM) – Deployment of identity and information management system (expected to be completed by 6/1/14)

(iii)

Active Directory (AD) – Refresh and restructuring (expected to be completed 6/1/2015)

Client Computing Services (i)

In-building wireless access – Objective is to provide City workers and guests with wireless network access (expected to be completed by 12/31/14)

(ii)

BYOD – Objective is to enhance VPN capabilities to support personal computing device access to network (expected to be completed by 12/31/14)

(iii)

Tablets – Expands alternate tablet offerings (expected to be completed by 6/1/14)

(iv)

Windows 7 – Enterprise deployment (expected to be completed by 5/1/14)

(v)

Microsoft Office 365 Services deployment (expected to be completed by 9/30/14)

(vi)

Enterprise Land Management System (ELMS) – New system to replace several existing systems for the enterprise management of land and related activities. (expected to be completed by 12/31/15).

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3.6

(vii)

Intelligent Operations Platform (IOP) – Deployment of integrated operations analytics platform (expected to be completed by 3/31/14)

(viii)

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) – People Soft and Business Intelligence system upgrade – (expected to be completed by 6/1/2015)

(ix)

Minneapolis Emergency Call Center (MECC) 911 – Complete server, SAN and storage infrastructure refresh for the mission critical 911 emergency computer aided dispatch environment; includes move to server virtualization (expected to be completed by 12/31/14).

Locations The City’s IT provides services and connectivity to approximately 70 facilities. There are different types of facilities depending on the services provided at that location. The types of facilities include but are not limited to administrative office buildings, City Hall, public works, fire stations, police precincts, service centers, impound lots, etc. A listing of locations with IT equipment is provided in Attachment B-1 (City Locations & Associated IT Equipment).

3.7

Service Desk The City IT department provides a Service Desk to over 3,600 City workers using the City’s IT services, providing a central point of contact for IT services. Primary Service Desk functions are currently sourced to Unisys. The Service Desk is available 7 days a week, 24 hours a day. The Service Desk handles approximately 1,500 calls per month and approximately 1,000 emails per month. A “red phone” between the Minneapolis Emergency Control Center (MECC) operations center and the Service Desk is used to communicate critical outage notifications. The red phone is a dedicated phone located in the MECC and at the Service Desk that will automatically dial the other station when the handset is taken off the hook.

3.8

Servers and Storage (a)

There are approximately 75 physical and 108 virtual windows servers supporting the City's applications and databases (further described below) in the Unisys data center. The servers are generally Windows-based servers running on X86 platforms using VMWare configured on Unisys hardware. There are approximately 40 x86 servers in the CAD 911 environment, 30 test and production servers located in City Hall datacenter and 7 disaster recovery servers located in the Unisys Data Center in Eagan.

(b)

Server storage within the Unisys data center is currently owned and managed by Unisys and standardized in the Unisys data center on EMC platforms. Tier

Unisys Data Center Storage Description

Allocated (GB)

1

RAID 5 configuration

3,848

2

RAID 5 configuration

67,811

2 NAS

RAID 5 configuration

14,440

3

ATMOS network-attached disk

City of Minneapolis RFP for Outsourced IT Services 21

0

Issue Date: February 27, 2014

The CAD 911 environment utilizes EMC SAN storage located in the City Hall Data Center. A combination of RAID 10 and 5 levels are used. There are 2,310 GB allocated for use in the CAD 911 environment. 3.9

Applications, Databases and Software The applications are generally commercial off-the-shelf ("COTS") applications hosted in a data center environment provided by Unisys or SaaS provider and on desktops. PeopleSoft software is used to support Human Resources and Finance and has the largest City employee application team. In addition to PeopleSoft, the City's application environment consists of the following:

3.10

(a)

Approximately 20 major enterprise business systems

(b)

Approximately 200 business and general productivity applications

(c)

Approximately 40 SaaS applications

(d)

Approximately 100 applications have a data center component, the majority of which reside in the Unisys data center

(e)

The City of Minneapolis uses ESRI software for its GIS system

(f)

Infrastructure software is listed in Attachment B-2 (Infrastructure Software).

(g)

The City of Minneapolis has standardized its environment on two types of databases, SQL Server and Oracle. There are approximately 600 SQL Server and 50 Oracle databases.

Client Computing (a)

(b)

Overview (i)

The City has over 3,000 client computing devices. The clients generally use laptops and desktops with additional tablets and smart phones. Tablets and smart phones have full VPN access to all resources that clients require.

(ii)

Public Safety has approximately 380 vehicles for police, fire and EMS that are equipped with specialized vehicle computing devices which include ruggedized laptops and mounted workstations (Data911). These devices are used to connect into the City's network via VPN using both the City's public Wi-Fi provided by USIW and cellular broadband service data coverage. The availability of these devices to their users, and the connectivity of these devices into the City's network, is critical to maintain public safety for the City.

(iii)

The City's client computing operating system for laptops and desktops is in the process of being refreshed to Windows 7.

(iv)

There are approximately 40 tablets deployed and supported by Unisys.

(v)

Client computing support is grouped into two different types, standard and premium. Premium is designed to provide a higher level of service to a smaller subset of clients.

Client Computing The City is using Dell laptops and desktops. The tablet environment is more varied. The device description listed in the following table is for example

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purposes only, the devices in the environment differ somewhat depending on the age of the equipment. The City plans on evolving with the industry in regards to Windows mobile devices.

Device Type

Quantity/Service Type

Device Description

Laptop

974/ Standard

6430 Processor: Intel Core i5 3320 (2.6ghz), Operation System: Windows 7, Memory: 4.0GB, DDR3 1600 mhz, Display: 14 Inch Anti-Glare LCD, Hard Drive: 320GB HDD 7200RPM Drive: 8X DVD+/- RW, Battery: 6 Cell Primary Battery, Case: Dell Professional 16" Carrying Case, Wireless: 802.11n mini-card

96 /Premium

Desktop

1,840 / Standard

34 / Premium

9010 SFF Processor: Intel Core i5 3570 3.4ghz), Operation System: Windows 7, Memory: 4.0GB, DDR3 1600 mhz, Monitor: Dell 21.5 inch flat panel UltraSharp U2212H monitor Video: Integrated Intel DP/DP/VGA Hard Drive: 250GB SATA Hard Drive, Drive: 8X DVD+/- RW Slim, Keyboard: USB Keyboard Mouse: Dell USB Optical mouse

iPad

231 / Standard

Apple iPad

Tablet PC

38 / Standard

Dell Latitude XT3 Tablet - Intel® Core™ i5 2520M, Memory 4GB, 13.3 HD LCD with camera, Windows 7,320GB 7200rpm, Network: Intel 802.11n, Power: 6-Cell Primary Battery

1 / Premium Mounted Workstation/Mobile Data Computer

366 / Standard

(c)

Data911 M6 mobile computer. These devices are supported by Unisys but the hardware is owned by the City of Minneapolis. These devices are located in public safety vehicles.

Printers, Multi-Functional Devices and Peripheral Equipment There are approximately 550 standard printers that are either network-connected or locally to a client’s computing device. There are approximately 430 multifunctional devices. Multi-functional devices are defined as a combined copy, print, and scan capable network connected devices. The multi-functional devices are currently supported through independent suppliers. Peripheral devices include desktop cameras, desktop scanners and other peripheral devices giving clients the flexibility to have peripheral hardware tools connected to their client computing device. The client-provided devices are tested by the City's IT engineers and are installed by Unisys technicians. These devices are generally considered consumable products and therefore do not carry specific warranty or support on the hardware. The deskside support staff generally support the required manufacturer software required to run the peripheral device on the client computing device.

(d)

Mobile Device Management (MDM) MDM services are provided by Airwatch via Unisys. Currently there are approximately 230 supported iOS devices, both City and client provided. The City expects to increase its mobile management capabilities.

3.11

"Sandbox" Environment The City utilizes a “sandbox” environment as a research and development environment intended to isolate changes from the City’s production environment. The “sandbox”

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environment is utilized by the City’s IT staff principally for internal application research and development, and 3rd party software or tools assessment. It is also used by City's architects to experiment with a wide range of infrastructure and enterprise technologies.

3.12

(a)

Support and maintenance for the sandbox’s environment is provided by the City's IT Solution Engineering and Enterprise Infrastructure groups. This includes all support and maintenance activities (account provisioning, patching, backups, monitoring, scheduling) associated with the infrastructure software (operating systems, active directory, databases – physical/logical, etc.). This environment is completely separate from the rest of the City’s infrastructure currently supported by Unisys, and from the City's application development environment and hence there is no overlap in support responsibilities. External trusts have been set-up to allow IT staff to use their City production credentials when accessing resources in the sandbox environment.

(b)

Managing the support aspects of the “sandbox” environment is critical to enabling the City's architects to accurately determine if existing/future solutions may meet the goals and objectives of the City.

(c)

From a hardware perspective, the “sandbox” environment consists of 5 Hypervisor host servers, 2 iSCSI SANs, and 2 associated SAN switches. There are also a limited number of client devices (desktops, laptops). This hardware is owned by the City and hardware support is currently the City’s responsibility. All hardware was purchased within the last 6 months, has a 4 year warranty, and is covered by the hardware vendor’s "4 Hour Mission Critical Onsite Parts and Labor Dispatch" plan.

(d)

All “sandbox” devices are on a dedicated segment of the City's network. Network infrastructure and network security is currently supported by Unisys.

Network (a)

(b)

Data networking platforms (i)

The City places much emphasis on the operation of the City’s network, and attempts to stay aligned with industry best practices as it regards system design, product and service selection, staffing models, and other architectural decisions.

(ii)

The City has generally standardized on Cisco network hardware.

General description of the City’s WAN Environment (i)

Operation of the City’s network spans over 70 facilities with 160 miles of connectivity utilizing approximately 470 network devices.

(ii)

The City’s private network connects the Unisys host data center in Eagan and Roseville with over 70 locations using Century Link Metro Optical Ethernet services, Century Link DS1 services and direct fiber connections.

(iii)

The Cisco Nexus hardware platform is used to connect the Unisys Eagan data center with the City Hall data center and the City’s locations with a Metro Optical Ethernet ring.

(iv)

Unisys network services includes hardware, software, operations and management all routers required to run an efficient secure network.

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(c)

(d)

(e)

(v)

External connections include CAD/911 infrastructure, Hennepin County, Park Board, State of MN, University of Minnesota, Unisys Blue Bell Support.

(vi)

The Unisys disaster recovery data center is located in Roseville MN and is connected to Eagan with one DS3 circuit.

(vii)

The Minneapolis Emergency Call Center (MECC) and the production Public Safety CAD 911 system are located in City Hall. External Public Safety call centers (Hennepin County Medical Center, University of Minnesota) connect to the production system via a Century Link Metro Optical Ethernet connection.

(viii)

The Disaster Recovery Public Safety CAD 911 system is located in the Unisys Data Center in Eagan. The MECC Disaster Recovery call center connects to the DR system via a Century Link Metro Optical Ethernet connection.

General description of Internet Service Provisioning (i)

At the Unisys Data Center, the City utilizes high-speed internet services. Redundant connectivity is provided by two Century Link Metro Optical Ethernet connections and two Broadwing connections and require a capacity of up to 100 MB.

(ii)

Unisys manages all devices (routers, firewalls, IDS, etc.) used to provide the Internet service. This includes working with carriers to resolve any service issues.

Description of site Local Area Networks (i)

All networks provide a common layer 1-3 infrastructure. The City provides gigabit server connections and switch-to-switch connections. Power-over-Ethernet services are provided as needed for IP telephones and wireless devices.

(ii)

The typical small and medium LAN is built from a “core” switch providing IP routing services and 3-8 stackable LAN switches providing access services. There are some redundant links present.

(iii)

The City has deployed wireless access points for network connectivity in approximately 25 locations for internal city workforce and guests. There are approximately 240 wireless access points. The City has also deployed an external wireless access service managed and deployed by USIW. Facility low voltage wiring for voice, data and building access points is currently coordinated through the City IT department and is installed by All State Communications.

Virtual Private Network (VPN) Remote Connections (i)

Remote Access services are consumed by approximately 35% of the internal workforce. The Cisco VPN solution is located in the Eagan Data Center and includes the client desktop software for authorization and authentication. Two-factor (password and certificate) authentication is required. The City is licensed for 500 simultaneous connections. The current volumes are approximately 80-100 simultaneous remote connections.

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Issue Date: February 27, 2014

(f)

(ii)

Quality of Service (QOS) configuration provides for Public Safety VPN remote access connection to have bandwidth priority.

(iii)

Public Safety Vehicles utilize Netmotion VPN mobile solution. This solution provides two factor authentication with 2FA One add on software. The solution is configured to support 400 devices. The current volume indicates approximately 200 simultaneous connections at peak times.

(iv)

Third Party connections currently connect via VPN. There are approximately 25 B2B VPN connections.

Transport (i)

(ii)

(g)

In general, the types of transport services currently utilized are: (A)

Ethernet services generally referred to as Metro Ethernet;

(B)

Time-division multiplexing supporting certain voice communications and services (ISDN, Primary Rate Interfaces, Normal Single Line telephone service that offers custom calling features, i.e. call forward, call waiting. services, DS3, DS1-both interstate and intrastate, MOE, 1FB, DID, DSL, POTS);

(C)

Long distance services;

(D)

Session Initiated Protocol services; and

(E)

ISP and other services

Transport is currently provided by Century Link. Circuits include: (A)

(3) Century Link 2-way PRI’s over copper

(B)

(4) Century Link 2 way PRI’s over DS3

(C)

(1) Century Link 311 PRI over copper

(D)

(9) Century Link DS1s for voice and data

(E)

(27) Century Link enterprise MOEs for voice and data

(F)

(8) Century Link MOEs for CAD/911

(G)

(20) Century Link Centrex connected sites for voice.

Voice Systems and Applications The City has both a main voice system platform and 911 system platform. These platforms have connectivity via the data circuits indicated above. A local certified Unify maintenance provider is contracted to provide the maintenance support, repairs and certain installs, moves, adds and changes (IMACs) for these systems.

(h)

Public Works Network The Minneapolis Water Treatment and Distribution Services (WTDS) Division provides safe drinking water to the City of Minneapolis, 7 surrounding suburbs, and numerous large users such as the University of Minnesota and the MSP Airport. Minneapolis Water Treatment & Distribution Services has many facilities, including river intakes and pump stations, treatment plants, reservoirs and other facilities, as well as approximately 1000 miles of water mains that

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bring our tap water to customers. Minneapolis WTDS has two main treatment locations or campuses, which will be the focus of network support. These campuses are located in Fridley and Columbia Heights, both adjacent suburbs to Minneapolis. These locations contain approximately 120 employees. The treatment facilities and processes are staffed and operated 24/7/365 and are considered to be critical infrastructure. The uptime, performance and support for both networks are key to the production of potable water. Minneapolis WTDS utilizes two distinct and separated networks in additions to the City’s network: (i)

(ii)

Water Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Network. Isolated control system wide-area network (WAN) internal to the Fridley and Columbia Heights locations. Network currently hosts systems such as SCADA, Maximo, Records and Record Management software, and Drawings / Water Files. (A)

The backbone of the WAN is redundant, non-parallel fiber connectivity between each treatment facility within each location. Within each facility exists both copper and fiber media connecting SCADA devices back to a facility switch, sometimes through a media converter. The network also extends out to devices in the field via fiber to facilities such as lagoons and pump stations that are not necessarily inside buildings.

(B)

The standard SCADA switch is a Cisco product.

(C)

The SCADA network consists of approximately 22 servers, 75 workstations and 10 laptops.

(D)

Over 100 Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) are connected to the network.

(E)

The network is segmented into 2 subnets and VLANs at each location (total of 4 subnets and VLANS).

(F)

The two locations are connected via point-to-point 5.8GHz microwave radio that offers speeds up to 100Mbps.

(G)

Switching Routers existing between each campus.

(H)

The domain is Microsoft Server 2008R2 with Active Directory. The workstations are XP and Win7.

Water Security Network. Isolated WAN internal to Fridley and Columbia Heights. This network hosts physical access and perimeter detection systems. (A)

The Security network designed to match the SCADA network. Connectivity is similar within and between each location, including the same make and model of switches, convertors, and microwave.

(B)

Core switch is a Cisco product. There are 9 facility or area switches.

(C)

One subnet and VLAN are on the Security network.

(D)

One 2008 Domain Controller, 2 existing security application servers, and 2 disk storage servers are used for video recording.

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Issue Date: February 27, 2014

3.13

(E)

A new perimeter detection system implementation is near completion and utilizes 4 servers.

(F)

There are approximately 10 Win7 and XP workstations.

(G)

Currently, no remote access or wireless exists on either WTDS network. Data centers for each WTDS network exist in Fridley with one server closet at Columbia Heights for both networks.

Data Centers (a)

Unisys - Eagan MN (Primary), Roseville MN (Back Up) Unisys provides a primary hosting data center located in Eagan, MN with a second data center to be used in the event of a disaster in Eagan located in Roseville MN. The Eagan data center is certified as Tier 3 while Roseville is certified as Tier 1. Production and test environments for the server based applications are hosted in the Eagan data center. The current disaster recovery solution is designed for seven designated applications with a recovery point objective ranging between .3 hours to 72 hours. The Public Safety 911 disaster recovery/ back up environment is located in the Unisys Eagan data center with a 4 hour Recovery Point Objective. The Unisys data center is also the Internet access point for the City.

(b)

City Hall Data Center The City Hall building includes two data center configurations. This data center contains the 911 infrastructure production environment, application development environment, voice systems, and the “sandbox” environment described above. The 911 environment is configured on a separate network and domain. There is currently a dedicated Unisys technical staff to support the 911 infrastructure. This data center is also the main distribution point for telecommunications connectivity with the exception of internet access.

4.

SOLUTION OBJECTIVES, CONSTRAINTS, TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS AND SOLUTION DESIGN CRITERIA This Section 4 sets forth at a high level what the City desires in a supplier solution. More specifically, this Section sets forth the objectives that the City expects to realize, as well as certain constraints governing Supplier's solution. In addition, this Section sets forth certain technical requirements that must be satisfied by Supplier's solution. 4.1

Objectives (a)

Relationship (i)

(ii)

Create a value-added relationship between City and the supplier whereby the supplier: (A)

accepts accountability for fulfillment of its responsibilities;

(B)

makes decisions and acts in the best interest of the City;

(C)

remains knowledgeable about City's business; and

(D)

remains committed to the business success of City.

Create a flexible relationship:

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(b)

(A)

under which the supplier will be responsive to the City's requirements, changes in technology, and improved methods for providing technology services; and

(B)

which cost effectively accommodates changes in volumes of operation, new generations of technology, and improved methods of monitoring, measuring and achieving increased levels of service.

(iii)

Ensure that the City retains appropriate control over key decisions affecting users or impacting the IT environment.

(iv)

Maintain an "A" team to provide the Services and engage with the City in maintaining the parties' relationship.

(v)

Make available to the City benefits available to the supplier by leveraging the supplier's own network and relationships with strategic partners and vendors.

Solution (i)

Conduct a documented and planned transition of outsourced services to the supplier from City and existing contractor(s) in a manner that ensures minimal business disruption and business risk to the City.

(ii)

Develop and provide a solution that: (A)

aligns with the City's "2020" vision goals, as may be modified from time to time (a current version of which can be viewed at http://www.minneapolismn.gov/council/council_goals_index);

(B)

aligns with and enables the City's IT vision for: (1) (2)

empowering the City's workforce through IT, and closing the "digital divide" and motivating residents to join the digital society, to improve the ability of the City's residents to access information and otherwise engage with the City;

(C)

reduces unnecessary complexity, favors simplicity in design, and is adaptable to change;

(D)

maintains appropriate levels of security; and

(E)

interoperates and integrates with City’s technology architecture and environment in a seamless and efficient manner.

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(c)

Service Delivery & Performance (i)

Provide high-quality services and continuous improvement using robust and standardized processes, consistent with that of industry standards and best practices (e.g., ITIL).

(ii)

Support and enable the improvement of IT clients' satisfaction with and their assessment of IT services provided by the City.

(iii)

Align performance and satisfaction measures with client experience.

(iv)

Enable the City's vision of IT serving as an agile enabler of technology and information solutions to the City's IT clients by, among other things:

(v) (d)

Responding and adapting quickly to changing needs and priorities (e.g., providing rapid response timeframes for IT project estimating);

(B)

Being agile to provide solutions in support of new initiatives, applications, business functions and processes;

(C)

Supporting the City's IT staff to focus more on enhancing the relationship between the City's IT and its clients and performing its core competencies, such as strategic IT planning, architecture and the integration of new technologies and business opportunities; and

(D)

Establishing an environment that rewards creativity, and a framework for making available innovative solutions for the benefit of the City's IT clients; and

(E)

Evolving the Services to reflect industry innovations.

Establish and maintain currency of the systems used to provide the services.

Financial (i)

4.2

(A)

Explore opportunities to increase the value, or reduce the cost, of the Services to the City, by among other ways: (A)

Providing pricing for the Services that is market competitive; and

(B)

Achieving efficiency through simplification of the IT environment.

(ii)

Provide the City with a flexible pricing structure for the Services to enable the City to leverage both fixed and consumption-based expense structures.

(iii)

Provide an agreed set of levers which at the City's option could be exercised during the term to achieve cost reductions (e.g., to accommodate budget reductions).

(iv)

Adopt a framework whereby the supplier retains the economic risk associated with its failure to fulfill its responsibilities.

Constraints (a)

General

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Supplier's solution and performance under any ultimate agreement must be in compliance with all applicable laws and City’s policies relevant to the Services, including those referenced in Attachment C (City Policies/Regulatory Requirements). (b)

(c)

4.3

Solution (i)

All City data must reside within the continental United States.

(ii)

Any Supplier personnel interfacing with the City's internal IT clients or accessing the City's operational environment must be on-shore.

(iii)

Supplier personnel with physical or logical access to criminal justice information must be a U.S. citizen, permanent resident and/or have been living in the United States for at least 5 years.

(iv)

Supplier's solution must exhibit a culture of support and dedication to minority and women-owned businesses ("M/WBEs").

Commercial (i)

Supplier's Proposal should reflect an anticipated term of five years for a definitive agreement. However, the City may wish to specify a longer or shorter term during the negotiation process, in which case the City would work with Supplier to understand the impacts, if any, to its Proposal during such process. The City shall have two term renewal options, with each option permitting a renewal for a period of time up to two years, as specified by the City. Notwithstanding the foregoing, if Supplier believes a different length of term will permit it to provide better pricing or value to the City, it may propose such different length as part of an Alternative Proposal (as described in Section 5.15 below).

(ii)

The City shall have termination rights permitting City to terminate at any time for its convenience.

(iii)

The account leadership team whom Supplier proposes to be primarily responsible for the City engagement (including without limitation the individual that Supplier proposes be responsible for the City's account (e.g., Account Executive or similar title)) should be present at and participate in any solution discussions and negotiations with the City.

Technical Requirements and Solution Design Criteria City expects Supplier's solution, Transition (and if applicable Transformation) to meet the following technical requirements and design criteria: (a)

General Solution Design Criteria for all Service Categories With respect to each Service Category, Supplier's solution should satisfy the following attributes: (i)

General Criteria Solutions should demonstrate agility, flexibility and innovation to increase, decrease or change as the City evolves and/or technology evolves. In addition, solutions should provide for: (A)

Proactive monitoring;

(B)

Flexibility to introduce new technology ;

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(ii)

(C)

Opportunities to leverage cloud type services where aligned with the City's objectives and constraints;

(D)

Fast provisioning of additional and/or changing capacity; and

(E)

All encryption algorithms will have a minimum of a 128 bit encryption.

Security The City expects all Suppliers to recommend, implement and maintain secure services and apply industry standard security controls in all aspects of their services and operations that impact the City’s information security objectives for confidentiality, integrity and availability. All solutions are expected to deliver the following: (A)

Privileged User Management. The City expects Supplier to monitor the activity of privileged users assigned to deliver Services to the City, and maintain the availability and integrity of activity history records for at least 12 months.

(B)

Vulnerability Management. The City expect the Suppliers to maintain and report on a vulnerability management program for all Supplier-managed devices and software used to provide Services to the City.

(C)

Managed Security Services Integration. The City expects the Supplier to accommodate integrations; implementations and administrative controls required by the City’s managed security services implementation.

(D)

Supplier's solution should have the flexibility to accommodate third-party performance of Services corresponding to the Managed Security Service Category.

Additional security requirements and design criteria that are specific to each Service Category are noted in the sections below. (iii)

Service Management Process and Tools (A)

The intention of the City is to have suppliers follow consistent processes; detailed process descriptions are provided as part of the Scope Models referenced in Section 1.6.

(B)

The City’s objective is to have an overarching, proactive monitoring framework such that the City’s IT and suppliers know about a problem before their clients. Dashboard tools for the City’s IT experts will be critical. In addition to each Supplier’s performance of monitoring functions relative to the scope of Services it intends to provide, the City is seeking a solution with the following attributes: •

Proactive monitoring;



Framework for end-to-end application monitoring;



Web performance monitoring;



Utilization and capacity monitoring; and

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• (b)

Computing Service Category (i)

Without dictating the actual solution the City is interested in exploring a solution that provides the benefits of Cloud services (IaaS).

(ii)

With respect to the Computing Service Category only, the solution should satisfy the following attributes:

(iii)

Level 1 ) Mission Critical

(c)

a client dashboard.

2) Business Critical

(A)

Minimum of Tier 3 certified data center for production systems;

(B)

Defined network segmentation if shared with other clients;

(C)

Infrastructure to support n -tier application architecture;

(D)

Data center network providing a minimum of Gigabit Ethernet network connections with Quality of Service (QOS);

(E)

Availability of proxy services;

(F)

Proactive monitoring of environment with auto alerting;

(G)

Production and test environment separation;

(H)

Internet Service Provider connection with fully redundant, dual carrier, automatic failover connections. Bandwidth minimum of 100 MB with ability to expand capacity to 1 GB by 2016;

(I)

Storage solutions should be industry-standard, provide the opportunity for automating information lifecycle management, and provide robust monitoring and effective reporting for purposes of capacity management. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, such solutions should include tiered storage systems capability.

Disaster Recovery (A)

Data center-level recovery at an alternative site in the event of a catastrophic facility or location event; and

(B)

Solutions should provide for the following recovery levels with the following corresponding attributes (note that the number of applications are as of the present time and are subject to change): Current Number of Applications 4

Definition

26

Loss of availability impacts continuity of critical business operations

Loss of availability impacts lifesafety

Recovery Time Objective 30 minutes 4 hours

Recovery Point Objective 15 minutes 24 Hours

Network Services Category

With respect to the Network Services Category only, Supplier's solution should satisfy the following attributes:

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(d)

(i)

Internet Service Provider connection with fully redundant dual carrier with automatic failover connections. Bandwidth minimum of 100 MB with capacity to 1 GB by 2016.

(ii)

Ability to identify distinct devices on the network and apply access rules to grant full or limited access to authorized devices and deny access to unauthorized devices (both wired and wireless);

(iii)

Ability to apply access control policies to VPN connections;

(iv)

Support access control for heterogeneous client devices (e.g. Windows and Mac);

(v)

Prevent multiple location outages resulting from singular network failures;

(vi)

Integrate with mobile device management systems operated by the City or a third party; and

(vii)

For transport Services: (A)

All circuits providing metro Ethernet must be upgradable;

(B)

All Direct-inward-Dial (DID) numbers must remain unchanged and portable;

(C)

Architecture and/or protocol encapsulations and/or translations – at any layer must preserve underlying City protocol identifications; and

(D)

Any internal address translations (NAT, Carrier NATs, etc.) for whatever purpose must do so in a transparent manner preserving the underlying addressing at ingress and egress points.

Service Desk/Client Computing Services With respect to the Service Desk/Client Computing Service Category only, Supplier's solution should provide the following: (i)

City's access to and use of change, incident, problem, and configuration management systems, which should leverage industry standard tools;

(ii)

Integration or bridging with applicable ITSM tools utilized by other suppliers providing services to the City;

(iii)

Capacity management reporting;

(iv)

A configuration management database (CMDB) tool with the capability to receive or integrate data from other sources resulting in a single CMDB.

(v)

Infrastructure to support the service management tools provided by Supplier;

(vi)

Flexibility for clients to implement peripheral devices to enable higher workforce efficiency;

(vii)

Self-service options to clients, thereby promoting efficiency and quality of IT services;

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(e)

(viii)

Client software inventory management and services to detect and report the presence of unauthorized software on managed devices;

(ix)

Ability to accommodate a "bring your own device" ("BYOD") policy; and

(x)

Dual factor authentication at the client computing device level.

Managed Security Services With respect to the Managed Security Services Category only, Supplier's solution should satisfy the following attributes: (i)

Threat intelligence is applied to existing countermeasures;

(ii)

Monitoring sources into centralized SEIM and advanced analytics platform. Advanced analytics should aggregate and correlate events from an optimized set of logs and other sources, per Supplier recommendation, to identify and alert on potential and actual attacks or breaches. Supplier should consider using the Arcsight platform to leverage the City’s current implementation to the degree feasible;

(iii)

24x7 centralized security operations, including but not limited to initial analysis of suspicious events to identify, prioritize and initiate incident response workflows;

(iv)

End-to-end security incident management, including but not limited to, integration with City and other supplier processes to manage incidents across Service Categories;

(v)

Provide centralized tools that include capabilities, including but not limited to: (A)

malware detection and prevention;

(B)

managing security device configuration and policies; and

(C)

log collection, management and retention with capability to normalize log formats for uniform reporting.

Such centralized tools should have capabilities including, but not limited to, dashboard views and easy-to-use reports to audit current state and review change history. 5.

PROPOSAL RESPONSE In order for the City to efficiently and effectively analyze all Supplier proposals, it is important that Supplier's Proposal comply with the requirements in this Section 5, as well as the additional instructions regarding the required Proposal formats and submission process described in Section 6.1. Supplier must use the RFP response templates that are referenced in this Section 5 and provided in Attachment D (Proposal Documents/ Templates); the City may refuse to accept or consider Supplier's Proposal if it does not meet the relevant requirements, including if it is not submitted complete or in the form required. Supplier's Proposal should contain the following sections, with each section provided as a separate file (except for section 9, which requires several separate files). The requirements for each of these Proposal sections are described in more detail in this Section 5.

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Recipient Proposal Sections and Topics Proposal Section # -1 2 3

4 5 6 7 8

Cover Letter Executive Summary Supplier Company Overview Response to City's Objectives, Constraints and Technical Requirements/Solution Design Criteria Scope Confirmation Recipient Solution Recipient Transition and Transformation Performance Model Term Sheet Pricing Model Terms and Conditions References Recipient’s Due Diligence Requirements Supplier Financial Information Small and Underutilized Business Program Other (optional)

9 10 11 12 13 14

5.1

Proposal Section Name

RFP Template or Instructions (if applicable) N/A N/A N/A

Proposal File Naming Convention

00 [Supplier name] Cover Letter 01 [Supplier name] Executive Summary 02 [Supplier name] Company Overview

Attachment D-1

03 [Supplier name] OCTR Response

Attachment D-2 Attachment D-3 Attachment D-3 Attachment D-4

04 [Supplier name] Scope Confirmation 05 [Supplier name] Solution 06 [Supplier name] Transition and Transformation 07 [Supplier name] Performance Model

Attachment D-5-A Attachment D-5-B Attachment D-6 Attachment D-7 N/A

08A [Supplier name] Pricing Workbook 08B [Supplier name] Rate Card 9 [Supplier name] Terms and Conditions 10 [Supplier name] References 11 [Supplier name] Due Diligence

N/A

12 [Supplier name] Financial Information

Attachment D-8

13 [Supplier name] SUBP Participation

N/A

14 [Supplier name] Other

Cover Letter Supplier’s Proposal shall contain a cover letter acknowledging Supplier's understanding of the RFP process and requirements set forth in this RFP, including its commitment to its Proposal. The cover letter shall be signed by an authorized representative of Supplier's company.

5.2

Executive Summary (a)

Section 1 of Supplier's Proposal is to summarize Supplier's offering, its approach and the value it will provide to the City. The executive summary must provide a concise summarization of the products and services being proposed to meet the City’s needs. The Supplier should also summarize their qualifications and experience in similar-sized operations and how their experience demonstrates that their solution is suitable for the City. In addition, the Supplier’s corporate culture should be summarized in this Section.

(b)

No template is provided, but the executive summary must be a standalone document without references to appendices or other materials and should not exceed 10 (one-sided) pages.

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5.3

Supplier Company Overview (a)

(b) 5.4

5.5

Section 2 of Supplier's Proposal is to provide information about the Supplier’s company, services, and corporate structure, including an organizational review, key contacts and customer relations. This section must include the following information: (i)

A brief description of Supplier;

(ii)

Supplier history;

(iii)

Supplier headquarters location, and location of key delivery centers if different than Supplier's headquarters location;

(iv)

Length of time in business;

(v)

Length of time providing the type of services outlined in Supplier's proposal;

(vi)

Length of time doing business with local government entities;

(vii)

Qualifications of the Supplier to respond to this RFP;

(viii)

Description of the Supplier’s involvement, if any, with establishing industry standards in areas relevant to the Proposal; and

(ix)

Names, addresses, telephone numbers and email addresses of principal Supplier contacts for the Proposal.

No template is provided, but the overview must be a standalone document without references to appendices or other materials.

Response to the City's Objectives, Constraints and Technical Requirements/Solution Design Criteria (a)

Section 3 of Supplier's Proposal is to confirm Supplier's agreement with the City's objectives described in Section 4.1 above and describe specifically how its proposal achieves those objectives in accordance with the constraints referenced in section 4.2 above and the technical requirements and solution design criteria referenced in Section 4.3.

(b)

For this section of Supplier's Proposal, Supplier must respond by completing the template provided in Attachment D-1 (Response to City's Objectives, Constraints and Technical Requirements/Solution Design Criteria) in accordance with the included instructions. To the extent that another part of the Proposal directly addresses the objective, constraint or technical requirement/design criteria (as applicable), Supplier may include as part of its response a cross reference to the applicable section/paragraph of its Proposal, to avoid unnecessary duplication. Regardless, each objective and constraint shall be addressed either with a response or a cross reference, or a combination of the two.

Scope (a)

In Section 4 of its Proposal, Supplier shall (i) indicate which one or more of the Service Categories for which it is submitting a proposal, and (ii) expressly confirm whether it agrees to provide all of the Services corresponding to such Service Category(ies), as set forth in the Scope Models referenced in Section 1.6.

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5.6

5.7

5.8

(b)

For this section of Supplier's Proposal, Supplier must respond by completing the template provided in Attachment D-2 (Specification of Service Category(ies) and Confirmation of Scope) in accordance with the included instructions.

(c)

The City's strong preference is that for any Service Category that Supplier wishes to provide a proposal, the Supplier provide all of the Services corresponding to such Service Category. However, if Supplier believes that it can provide a solution that better fits the City's objectives by not providing all of the Services corresponding to a Service Category, then it should: (i)

indicate this in its response to Attachment D-2 and provide a summary of the Services corresponding to such Service Category that are not included in Supplier's Proposal; and

(ii)

using the Scope Models, indicate the specific Process/Element intersections corresponding to such Service Category that are not included as part of Supplier's proposal by placing the letter "X" in such intersections.

Solution Design (a)

Section 5 of Supplier’s Proposal shall describe Supplier’s overall solution design for the Services corresponding to each of the Service Category(ies) that Supplier is proposing to perform for the City (for any Service Category, the "Solution Design" for such category).

(b)

No template is provided, but this section of Supplier's Proposal must comply with the Solution instructions and drafting guidelines provided in Attachment D-3 (Solution and Transition/Transformation Instructions).

Transition & Transformation (a)

Section 6 of Supplier’s Proposal is to describe (a) how Supplier proposes to manage (i) its transition of Services from the incumbent delivery actors to Supplier to achieve the City's objectives ("Transition") and (ii) transformation from the City's current environment to the "to-be" environment contemplated by Supplier's Solution Design (“Transformation”), and (b) the specific projects Supplier proposes to achieve the Transition and Transformation.

(b)

No template is provided, but this section of Supplier’s Proposal must comply with the Transition and Transformation instructions and drafting guidelines provided in Attachment D-3 (Solution and Transition/Transformation Instructions).

Performance Model Term Sheet (a)

Section 7 of Recipient’s Proposal is to provide responses to the City's performance terms, including service levels, as set forth in Attachment D-4 (Performance Model Term Sheet).

(b)

For this section of Recipient's Proposal, Recipient must respond by completing the template provided in Attachment D-4 (Performance Model Term Sheet) in accordance with the included instructions.

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5.9

5.10

Pricing Model (a)

In Section 8 of Supplier’s Proposal, Supplier shall complete the Pricing Templates provided as Attachments D-5-A (Pricing Workbook) and D-5-B (Rate Card) (each in accordance with the instructions provided therein).

(b)

All Pricing Templates shall be submitted with the relevant formulas intact and accessible by the City.

(c)

Attachment D-5-C (Sample Pricing Workbook) contains a sample completed version of the Pricing Template set forth in Attachment D-5-A (Pricing Workbook). This is provided for mechanical guidance purposes only and should not be used for substantive guidance as to pricing.

(d)

The pricing contained in Supplier's responses to the Pricing Templates (Attachments D-5-A and D-5-B) must include all charges Supplier proposes to charge the City with respect to all of the Services comprising the corresponding Service Category(ies) included as part of Supplier's Proposal.

Terms and Conditions Attachment D-6 (Certain City Terms and Conditions) sets forth certain of the City’s standard terms and conditions for services agreements. Section 9 of Supplier’s Proposal shall include confirmation of Supplier's acceptance of the terms and conditions set forth in Attachment D-6, or to the extent that Supplier does not agree to all of such terms and conditions, Supplier should provide specific, proposed revisions to Attachment D-6 (in redline form). In developing its response, Supplier should note the following:

5.11

(a)

The City will not contract using any vendor standard terms and conditions of business, or use such standard terms and conditions as the basis of any negotiations.

(b)

The City reserves the right to modify the terms set forth in Attachment D-6 during the negotiation process. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the City anticipates that a more detailed set of terms and conditions specifically tailored to an IT outsourcing transaction will be prepared and presented to those suppliers who have been selected to participate in competitive negotiations.

References (a)

Supplier shall provide in Section 10 of its Proposal engagement descriptions and verifiable references for at least three (3) Supplier customers that, to the extent possible, have similar geographic footprints, and for which Supplier is currently providing services similar to the Services, including contact information for the references.

(b)

Separately, Supplier shall provide engagement descriptions and verifiable references for at least three (3) former Supplier customers for which Supplier provided within the last two (2) years (but no longer provides) services similar to the Services, including contact information for the references.

(c)

For subcontractors proposed by Supplier to perform a material portion of the Services, Supplier shall also provide the reference information required above with respect to each such subcontractor.

(d)

For this section of Supplier's Proposal, Supplier must respond by completing the template provided in Attachment D-7 (References) in accordance with the included instructions.

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5.12

5.13

Supplier’s Due Diligence Requirements (a)

Following down-select, Supplier will be provided the opportunity, to the extent practical and permitted by (or required of) the incumbent delivery actors, to conduct further due diligence on the then-existing operations. Although this RFP is intended to provide enough information to allow Supplier to develop its Proposal, it is ultimately Supplier's responsibility to request any clarification of any of the information provided with this RFP, either pursuant to the process set forth in Section 1.3 or as part of such due diligence.

(b)

It will be Supplier's responsibility during such due diligence process to obtain the information it deems necessary to provide a final, detailed, unqualified proposal that meets the City's requirements and to negotiate and execute a binding agreement with the City. Such an agreement will not contain provisions for Supplier to conduct due diligence after the agreement is executed or for any postexecution pricing or service level adjustments relating to such due diligence.

(c)

In Section 11 of its Proposal, Supplier should submit a detailed list of any additional due diligence – such as review of specific information, visits of certain facilities, and interviews of particular personnel – that Supplier would need to perform following down-selection if Supplier were chosen as a down-selected provider (as described in Section 6.3 below), in order to develop and submit a detailed and unqualified proposal not subject to assumptions.

(d)

The City requests that any due diligence requirements be tailored to the specific Services which Supplier is proposing to perform, and not seek the provision of information already set forth in this RFP. In addition, Supplier should avoid providing cookie-cutter, "kitchen sink" due diligence lists; the City appreciates thoughtful requests for supplementary information that the Supplier genuinely regards as being necessary in order to submit a detailed and unqualified proposal.

(e)

No template is provided, but Supplier's due diligence requirements must comply with the general instructions regarding the required Proposal formats described in Section 6.1.

Supplier Financial Information If requested by City, prior to award of a contract, the Supplier shall submit proof of adequate financial resources available to perform, execute, and complete the Services properly and within the times proposed in the Supplier’s Proposal, as may be modified during the negotiation process.

5.14

Small and Underutilized Business Program Attachment D-8 (Small and Underutilized Business Enterprises Program) sets forth a summary of the City’s Small and Underutilized Business Program ("SUBP") along with the required SUBP forms. It also includes a list of certified qualified and available Women Business Enterprises and Minority Business Enterprises that Supplier may solicit, a description of the certified NAISC Codes, and a list of women and minority organizations that Suppliers should include in their solicitations.

5.15

Other (Optional) (a)

Section 14 of Supplier's Proposal can be used to describe: (i)

To the extent that Supplier is proposing to perform Services for more than one Service Category, specifically how its Proposal would change if

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Issue Date: February 27, 2014

City selected Supplier to perform all such Services. Said differently, the City expects Supplier's Proposal for any single Service Category to stand on its own, but recognizes that there may be changes to its "stand alone" proposal (e.g., in the form of an opportunity to share Supplier account management resources across Service Categories, or otherwise achieve economies of scale) if the Supplier were selected to perform Services for multiple Service Categories. To the extent of any such changes, Supplier should articulate such changes with specificity as part of its response to this Section.

(b)

6.

(ii)

Supplier may also provide any additional information Supplier believes important for the City to understand to best evaluate Supplier and its offering, although the City does not expect any.

(iii)

In addition, as part of this section, Supplier may (at its option) propose, for consideration by the City, an alternative solution ("Alternative Proposal") to that otherwise proposed earlier in the Proposal. As part of any Alternative Proposal, Supplier should describe (A) specifically which aspects of its Proposal would be different under the Alternative Proposal, and (B) why Supplier believes the alternative approach would be more beneficial to the City. For clarity, Alternative Proposals are intended to be alternatives and supplements to Supplier’s core Proposal, and should not be used as a substitute to addressing City's stated requirements.

No template is provided, but any response must comply with the general instructions regarding the required Proposal formats described in Section 6.1.

INSTRUCTIONS ON RFP PROCESS 6.1

Proposal Submission (a)

Proposal Submission and Due Date (i)

Supplier shall submit (A) 15 complete printed copies of its Proposal (including the signed Cover Letters); and (B) 2 CDs or DVDs containing softcopies of its entire Proposal (including PDFs of the Signed Cover Letters) on or before April 24, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. CT, to the addressee provided below: City of Minneapolis - Procurement 330 2nd Avenue South, Suite 552 Minneapolis, MN 55401 The label should identify the contents as: "City of Minneapolis IT Sourcing Initiative 2014 Proposal – RFP”.

(ii)

Proposals submitted after the deadline, or which state that information will be provided ‘at a later date’, or which are otherwise incomplete or fail to comply with the requirements set forth in this RFP may be disqualified from participation in this RFP process.

(iii)

Notwithstanding any legends on the Proposal or any other statements to the contrary, all materials submitted in connection with Supplier’s response to this RFP will become the property of the City and may be returned only at the City’s option.

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(iv)

(b)

With respect to the information contained on Supplier’s CDs or DVDs: (A)

The folders and/or files should be organized in such a way as to preserve the order and labeling of how such information is presented in Supplier’s printed copy of its proposal;

(B)

Each document (and file name) should clearly show the name of Supplier and the file in accordance with the naming conventions referenced in Section 5 above.

(C)

Each file should be pre-formatted by Supplier to facilitate online viewing and printing in a form consistent with Supplier’s printed copy of its proposal;

(D)

All documents should be presented in a native Microsoft Office format (e.g., Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Project) wherever possible; and

(E)

Documents should not include embedded files.

Proposal Format Supplier shall submit both Microsoft Office and PDF file formats in preparing its Proposal to the maximum extent possible. All pages should be formatted to print on 8 ½ x 11” paper, unless another format is provided by the response template. Supplier responses should be specific, factual, brief and to the point.

(c)

Proposal Expiration Date Proposals in response to this RFP shall remain valid for nine (9) months from the Proposal due date. The City may request an extension of time if needed.

(d)

Supplier Data All Proposals shall be treated as non-public information until the Proposals are opened for review by the City. At that time, the names of the responders become public data. All other data is private or non-public until the City has completed negotiating an agreement with the selected supplier(s). At that time, the Proposals and their contents become public data under the provisions of the Minnesota Government Data Practices Act, Minnesota Statutes, Chapter 13 and as such are open for public review.

(e)

General Subject to questions and clarifications raised on specific issues in accordance with Section 1.3, Supplier shall be deemed, by the submission of its Proposal, to have understood fully the meaning of the overall RFP. Any claims of ambiguity after contract award will not be accepted by the City.

6.2

Supplier Presentations (a)

Upon completion of the City’s review of the written Proposals, the City may ask some or all of the RFP respondents to give an oral presentation of its proposal to the City.

(b)

Details pertaining to (including location and duration of) the oral presentation phase of the RFP process will be confirmed after Proposal submission, however the presentations are tentatively scheduled to begin the week ofMay 12, 2014.

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6.3

(c)

If Supplier is one of the RFP respondents asked to give an oral presentation, Supplier should prepare a comprehensive presentation that concentrates on the business and technical aspects of the Proposal, and should not be marketing discussions. This presentation will be considered part of the Supplier’s Proposal.

(d)

The City requests the actual members of the Supplier's proposed delivery team (including subcontractors) participate in the formal presentation.

(e)

Appropriate visual and written materials are expected, but the format will be left to the discretion of the Supplier. A soft copy of all presentation materials must be delivered to the Principal Contact at least one business day before the beginning of the presentation. Supplier should also bring a sufficient number of printed copies of the materials for the City attendees at the presentation.

(f)

The City may provide a last minute agenda or other direction for the Supplier’s presentation based on the City's initial review of the Proposals.

Downselection; Competitive Negotiations and Mutual Due Diligence After the completion of oral presentations (if any), the City may select those RFP respondents (each a "down-selected provider") with which to conduct simultaneous due diligence and competitive negotiations, leading to an unqualified proposal from each. (a)

(b)

Mutual Due Diligence Process (i)

Following this down-selection, the City will consider each down-selected provider’s request for specific due diligence items on a case-by-case basis. If Supplier is down-selected, it will be Supplier’s responsibility to obtain any additional information it deems necessary to remove any qualifications or contingencies from its Proposal. Any binding agreement the City negotiates and executes with a winning RFP recipient will not contain provisions providing for due diligence after such agreement is executed. Accordingly, there will be no pricing or service level adjustments relating to after-discovered information.

(ii)

The City will use all reasonable efforts to make available the information that is requested by the down-selected providers, and to aid in this process the City requires that, as part of its Proposal, and as further described Section 5.12 above, Supplier include a detailed description of the additional due diligence information that Supplier would like the opportunity to obtain. However, the City does not commit to providing any information requested and, regardless of whether the City is able to provide such information, the provisions of this Section 6.3(a) will continue to apply.

(iii)

The City expects to perform various due diligence activities on any down-selected providers. If Supplier is one of such down-selected providers, it shall be required to cooperate fully, openly and promptly with such diligence efforts.

Competitive Negotiations (i)

The City expects to conduct detailed negotiations with each of the downselected providers. Details regarding this process will be provided at the appropriate time to Supplier, if it is chosen to be a down-selected provider, and may include discussions based on any aspect of a Proposal.

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6.4

(ii)

The City intends to have representatives of Pillsbury, its advisor (and legal counsel), participate in all negotiations. The City encourages down-selected providers, as appropriate, to have its legal counsel participate as well. However, the City will not be precluded by the absence of down-selected providers' counsel from having its counsel participate, and down-selected providers will not be permitted to defer or revisit any matter due to the necessity of consultation with counsel.

(iii)

The competitive negotiation process is expected to culminate in the selection of one or more preferred suppliers with whom the City expects to enter into a definitive agreement.

City's Rights; Rejection of Proposals The City reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to reject any or all proposals or parts of proposals, to accept part or all of proposals on the basis of considerations other than lowest cost, and to create a project of lesser or greater expense and reimbursement than described in this RFP or the respondent's reply based on the component prices submitted.

6.5

Modification or Termination of RFP Process (a)

Subject to the rules and regulations of the City, including with respect to providing notification and, where applicable, providing the opportunity to revise proposals, the City reserves the right to, in its sole discretion, discontinue, cancel, amend, supplement, or otherwise change this RFP, the Initiative, the process used for evaluation, and the expected timeline at any time and for any reason, and makes no commitments, implied or otherwise, that this process will result in a business transaction with any provider.

(b)

If any addendum is issued for this RFP, it will be posted on the City of Minneapolis website at: http://www.minneapolismn.gov/finance/procurement/rfp

6.6

Supplemental Information If, subsequent to issuance of this RFP, additional relevant material is produced by or becomes available to the City, such material will (where appropriate) be posted on the City's website as specified in Section 6.5(b) above. Supplier should consider such information in its Proposal, and the City will assume that all changes or additional requirements transmitted have been taken into account in Supplier’s Proposal (including with respect to pricing), unless otherwise specified.

6.7

No Representations or Warranties (a)

The City makes no representations or warranties regarding the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this RFP or otherwise provided by the City through the RFP process. Supplier is responsible for making its own evaluation of information and data contained in this RFP or otherwise provided by the City, and for preparing and submitting responses to the RFP.

(b)

The City has attempted to validate the information provided in this RFP, but it is possible that Supplier may detect inconsistencies or potential errors. While Supplier should identify these potential issues in its questions or in an appendix to its Proposal, Supplier should use the information provided on an “as-is” basis for its initial Proposal. Information regarding the City and the Initiative may be revised or updated, and republished for inclusion in a final response.

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Issue Date: February 27, 2014

6.8

Proposal Preparation Costs Supplier will be responsible for all costs it incurs in connection with this RFP process (including but not limited to Proposal preparation, personnel time, travel-related costs, and other expenses) and any subsequent agreement negotiations.

7.

EVALUATION Each Proposal received will first be reviewed to determine responsiveness and completeness of the Proposal. If the Proposal is determined by the City to be responsive and complete, the City will proceed to evaluate the Proposal on its merits. The Supplier should note that while the total cost to the City of the proposed solution to deliver Services is a material factor, it will not be the sole factor in the City's evaluation; other aspects of Supplier's Proposal (e.g., solution, performance, terms and conditions, references, etc.) will also weigh in the City's evaluation. Ultimately, the City expects to select the Supplier(s) whose Proposal(s) the City determines, in its sole discretion, is(are) overall in the City’s best interests.

8.

LIST OF ATTACHMENTS AND EXHIBITS 8.1

8.2

Attachment A: Non-Disclosure Agreements (a)

Attachment A-1: Pillsbury Confidentiality and Non-Disclosure Agreement

(b)

Attachment A-2: City Confidentiality and Non-Disclosure Agreement

Attachment B: As-Is Environment Information (a)

Attachment B-1: City Locations & Associated IT Equipment (available pursuant to Section 1.7)

(b)

Attachment B-2: Infrastructure Software

(c)

Attachment B-3: Security Environment Information (available pursuant to Section 1.7)

8.3

Attachment C: City Policies/Certain Regulatory Requirements

8.4

Attachment D: Proposal Documents/Templates (a)

Attachment D-1: Response to City's Objectives, Constraints and Technical Requirements/Solution Design Criteria

(b)

Attachment D-2: Specification of Service Category(ies) and Confirmation of Scope

(c)

Attachment D-3: Solution and Transition/Transformation Instructions

(d)

Attachment D-4: Performance Model Term Sheet

(e)

Attachment D-5: Pricing Model (i)

Attachment D-5-1: Pricing Workbook

(ii)

Attachment D-5-2: Rate Card

(iii)

Attachment D-5-3: Sample Pricing Workbook

(f)

Attachment D-6: Certain City Terms and Conditions

(g)

Attachment D-7: References

(h)

Attachment D-8: Small and Underutilized Business Enterprises Program

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Issue Date: February 27, 2014

8.5

Attachment E: Supplier Questions Template

8.6

Attachment F: Scope Models (available pursuant to Section 1.6) (a)

Attachment F-1: Understanding Scope Models

(b)

Attachment F-2: Scope Models

(c)

Attachment F-3: Process Definitions

(d)

Attachment F-4: Element Definitions

City of Minneapolis RFP for Outsourced IT Services 46