Sidewalk Feasibility Study Town of Pierson, Florida


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April 2012 US Highway 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study Town of Pierson, Florida

Prepared for: Volusia TPO

Prepared by: Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. Suite 200, 445 24th Street Vero Beach, Florida 32960 ©Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. 2012

Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.

US Highway 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study

TABLE OF CONTENTS I.  II.  III.  IV.  V.  VI.  VII.  VIII.  IX. 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................................................ 1  INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................. 3  PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES ......................................................................................... 3  STUDY METHODOLOGY ............................................................................................... 3  EXISTING CONDITIONS................................................................................................. 5  GENERAL DESIGN PRINCIPALS .................................................................................. 7  CONCEPTUAL DESIGN RECOMMENDATIONS ....................................................... 11  FINANCIAL FEASIBILITY ............................................................................................ 12  DATA COLLECTION REFERENCES ........................................................................... 15 

LIST OF EXHIBITS EXHIBIT 1 EXHIBIT 2

IMBEDDED LIGHTS ................................................................................................... 10 ALTERNATIVE PEDESTRIAN CROSSWALK SIGNAGE ...................................... 10

LIST OF TABLES TABLE 1

ENGINEER’S OPINION OF PROBABLE COSTS ..................................................... 14

LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 2C

LOCATION MAP ........................................................................................................ 17 EXISTING CORRIDOR PHOTOS .............................................................................. 18 EXISTING CORRIDOR PHOTOS .............................................................................. 19 EXISTING CORRIDOR PHOTOS .............................................................................. 20

LIST OF MAPS MAP 1 MAP 2 MAP 3 MAP 4 MAP 5

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PROJECT CORRIDOR DESIGN PLANS ........................................................................ 21 PROJECT CORRIDOR DESIGN PLANS ........................................................................ 22 PROJECT CORRIDOR DESIGN PLANS ........................................................................ 23 PROJECT CORRIDOR DESIGN PLANS ........................................................................ 24 CROSS SECTIONS AND DETAILS ................................................................................ 25

April 2012

Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.

I.

US Highway 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Volusia Transportation Planning Organization (VTPO) provides assistance to local governments to improve bicycling and walking in the community. Federal funds are combined with local matching funds to program projects in the Florida Department of Transportation’s 5 year work program through the construction stage. The VTPO uses XU federal funds to perform bicycle & pedestrian feasibility studies for projects on the XU List of Prioritized Bicycle/Pedestrian Projects to help plan, design and build sidewalk and trail projects. The US 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study is a VTPO 2011 prioritized XU Bicycle/Pedestrian project as requested by the Town of Pierson. In an effort to provide safe and defined transportation space for the growing population of school-aged children and other pedestrians living in this area, the Town of Pierson wants to construct a continuous 5 foot pedestrian sidewalk through the center of Town. The objective of the project is to determine the feasibility of this path within the existing right-of-way to provide a safe alternative to motorized transit, particularly as it relates to school-aged children walking to and from Taylor Middle High School and Pierson Elementary School. The purpose of this project is to conduct a limited corridor study that will assess the feasibility of providing sidewalks along US Highway 17 (Center Street) from Washington Avenue to First Avenue and from Second Avenue to Hagstrom Road, a total distance of approximately 1.22 miles in length. The proposed sidewalks will connect to the existing sidewalks located on Center Street between Second Avenue and 1st Avenue on both east and west sides of the street. Currently, a sidewalk exists on the west side of the street between First Avenue and Washington Avenue but not on the east side. The existing sidewalk consists of a 5 foot concrete pathway with a grassed setback from the roadway. The study will focus on identifying the width of the sidewalk and its location in an effort to design a cost-effective path that fits within the existing right-of-way. Safety is of paramount concern for the consideration of this project. Due to the variety of residential land uses in the area and the proximity to both Pierson Elementary School and Taylor Middle-High School, it is imperative a safe passage be provided for the residents and students. Properly planned and constructed sidewalks can address pedestrian safety by separating pedestrians from vehicle traffic, providing a safe and functional space for all users of the corridor. A site visit was conducted on October 25, 2011 which consisted of traversing the project corridor in order to document the current constraints and opportunities within the ROW. Photographic documentation, graphic depiction and aerial maps assisted in recording the important details of the project and to note obstacles that might impede the project’s constructability. Members of the evaluation team collected information on field conditions and located potential constraints and opportunities associated with the proposed project. Together, with engineering and professional planning-level judgment, this information serves as the foundation for the recommendations included in this study. 

Adequate ROW exists along the corridor on both sides of the pavement to construct the desired facilities without the need for encroachment outside the right-of-way boundaries. This segment of US HWY 17 measures from over 180 feet at the south end to 60 feet at the north end of the project.

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US Highway 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study



The concept plan and typical cross sections included within this report were formulated based on the results of compiling data regarding existing conditions and applicable FDOT design guidelines.



Based on the data gathered, a 5 foot concrete sidewalk is proposed to be located 5 feet from the back of curb and 6 feet from edge of pavement. This design allows for adequate clear zone between the travel way and pedestrian traffic.



Potential conflicts may arise along this proposed path that can be resolved by field relocation of obstacles. Large trees and utility structures may be routed around as shown in the corridor design plans.



Potential encroachment of private property was not noted during the site reconnaissance of the corridor. However a corridor specific survey for the study area should be completed prior to the development of a sidewalk design and engineering drawings.



All proposed sidewalks will be constructed at grade.



Public involvement program will be provided by the Town of Pierson as part of the design schedule for the project.



Environmental conditions were considered as part of the feasibility study. Due diligence performed during the field reconnaissance and data review did not reveal conditions that may require additional design or permitting costs.



Generally, the water management districts consider sidewalk projects exempt from stormwater permitting.

The results of the study identified that the recommended width of the sidewalk and its location was feasible in order to design a cost-effective path that fits within the existing right-of-way.

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II.

US Highway 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study

INTRODUCTION

The Volusia Transportation Planning Organization (VTPO) recognizes the importance of developing a cohesive transportation network that provides safe, efficient, and accessible pedestrian and bicycle facilities. One way to accomplish this goal is to expand the integrated bicycle and pedestrian transportation system by continuing the feasibility studies of prioritized projects. The US 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study is a VTPO 2011 prioritized XU Bicycle/Pedestrian project as requested by the Town of Pierson. III.

PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES

The purpose of this project is to conduct a limited corridor study that will assess the feasibility of providing sidewalks along US Highway 17 (Center Street) (US HWY 17) from Washington Avenue to First Avenue and from Second Avenue to Hagstrom Road, a total distance of approximately 1.22 miles in length. The proposed sidewalks will connect to the existing sidewalks located on Center Street between Second Avenue and 1st Avenue on both east and west sides of the street. Currently, a sidewalk exists on the west side of the street between First Avenue and Washington Avenue but not on the east side. The existing sidewalk consists of a 5 foot concrete pathway with a grassed setback from the roadway. The objective of the project is to determine the feasibility of this path within the existing right-of-way to provide a safe alternative to motorized transit, particularly as it relates to school-aged children walking to and from Taylor Middle High School and Pierson Elementary School. The study will focus on identifying the width of the sidewalk and its location in an effort to design a cost-effective path that fits within the existing right-of-way. The project is located along historic US HWY 17, the main route through the Town of Pierson (See Location Map – Figure 1). Pierson is the northwestern most incorporated town in Volusia County. It is heavily reliant on agriculture, mainly consisting of fern growing, which is exported worldwide. According to the Town of Pierson 2010 Census results, the population of the area was approximately 1,736 people. From 2000 to 2010, the Pierson town population growth percentage was -33.1% (or from 2,596 people to 1,736 people). According to demographic information, more of the population walk or bike to work then in other areas of Florida. In an effort to provide safe and defined transportation space for the growing population of school-aged children and other pedestrians living in this area, the Town of Pierson wants to construct a continuous 5’ pedestrian sidewalk through the center of Town. The Town maintains a variable width right-of-way within this segment which measures from over 180 feet at the south end to 60 feet at the north end of the project. IV.

STUDY METHODOLOGY

The following tasks were completed per the project scope to provide an informed feasibility report in accordance with VTPO policies, procedures, guidelines and rules. In addition, the tasks will meet the procedures currently used by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), District Five Office to evaluate Enhancement (XU funded) bicycle and pedestrian corridor projects.

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US Highway 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study

1. A project coordination meeting was held with the VTPO’s Project Manager and the Town of Pierson representatives on October 25, 2011 for the purpose of scoping the project and obtaining relevant project information. 2. Data collection for the project consisted of obtaining copies of readily available planning, land use, and engineering information, including the following: a. FDOT, Contract Plans for State Road 15, dated March 2, 2009. These plans depicted the existing sidewalk and resurfacing project from north of Fourth Ave. to Putnam County Line. b. FDOT, Right-of-Way (ROW) Map for SR 15, dated January 27, 1941. These maps depict the existing ROW prior to placement of current infrastructure. c. Volusia County Property Appraisers parcel maps were downloaded to further delineate the area. This information serves as the most current ROW data available at the time of this evaluation. All measurements are assumed and for planning purposes only. d. Data also consisted of referencing readily available information from a variety of sources, including: VTPO, Volusia County, and FDOT. 3. A site visit was conducted on October 25, 2011 which consisted of traversing the project corridor in order to document the current constraints and opportunities within the ROW. Photographic documentation, graphic depiction and aerial maps assisted in recording the important details of the project and to note obstacles that might impede the project’s constructability. Members of the evaluation team collected information on field conditions and located potential constraints and opportunities associated with the proposed project. Together, with engineering and professional planning-level judgment, this information serves as the foundation for the recommendations included in this study. 4. A concept plan and typical cross sections were formulated based on the results of the previous tasks and applicable design guidelines. The concept plan and the typical section are based on design criteria for pedestrian facilities contained in the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Pedestrian Facilities Planning and Design Handbook; the FDOT Plans Preparation Manual (PPM); and the Manual on Uniform Minimum Standards for Design, Construction and Maintenance for Streets and Highways, The Florida Greenbook. In accordance with these reference manuals, a feasible design for the project was determined. 5. An Engineer’s Opinion of Probable Costs (EOPC) for Construction based on the refined conceptual design was prepared to construct a sidewalk within the proposed corridor. The EOPC was formulated based on FDOT District Five standards using their historical cost data. 6. Preparation of a Final Report followed receipt of comments by the VTPO and the Town. 7. Presentation of the final project recommendations will be made to the VTPO Board.

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V.

US Highway 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study

EXISTING CONDITIONS

The project is located within the Town of Pierson along US HWY 17 from Washington Avenue to Hagstrom Road (See Location Map – Figure 1). This section of US HWY 17 serves a variety of land uses including residential, commercial, and institutional. The roadway is currently a two-lane undivided section with 5 foot bike lanes on both sides of the roadway. These bike lanes appear to be utilized by pedestrians who wish to avoid walking within the uneven shoulders adjacent to the roadway. However, “goat paths” exist within the grassed shoulders indicating that pedestrian traffic frequently utilize this area. The speed limit is 55 miles per hour (MPH) at the south end of the project to the Town proper which mainly consists of rural land uses. The speed limit slows to 45 MPH as the land use becomes more urban and the center of Town is reached. At the north end, there is a school zone where the speed limit becomes 20 MPH when flashing. Utilities along the corridor include: water, storm water, cable, phone and overhead electric. Within a ½ mile radius of the project corridor are several public facilities, retail businesses, restaurants, schools and one public transit bus stop. Pierson Elementary School is located along this section of US HWY 17, between First Avenue and Washington Street. Taylor Middle-High School is located on Washington Avenue, approximately 1,500 feet east of the US HWY 17 intersection. US HWY 17 serves as a primary walking route to both of these schools. Safety is of paramount concern for the consideration of this project. Due to the variety of residential land uses in the area and the proximity to both Pierson Elementary School and Taylor Middle-High School, it is imperative a safe passage be provided for the residents and students. Properly planned and constructed sidewalks can address pedestrian safety by separating pedestrians from vehicle traffic, providing a safe and functional space for all users of the corridor. There are existing sidewalks on both sides of US HWY 17 between First Avenue and Second Avenue. The sidewalk continues on the west side of the street from First Avenue north to Washington Avenue. A signalized and marked pedestrian crosswalk exists at the intersection of US HWY 17 and Washington Avenue. A sidewalk extension project has been proposed that will extend the sidewalk on the north side of Washington Avenue from the intersection east to connect to the Middle-High School. In accordance with the Town of Pierson’s 2011 Comprehensive Plan update of the Transportation Element: Data, Inventory And Analysis, “The roadway system within the municipal boundary of the Town is increasingly impacted by vehicle through trips that originate from outside its borders, travel through the town and terminate outside its borders.” Furthermore, the Comprehensive Plan states that “Bicycle usage accounts for a very small percentage of traffic in Pierson. For the most part, bicycle usage here is by the youth population for recreational purposes and commuting to school. The elementary school, the high school and the Town's recreation facility on Washington Street are among the most frequented destinations. Residents of the Town who cannot make regular use of a motor vehicle often depend on bicycles for utilitarian trip purposes. The Town's youth are represented disproportionately among these transportation disadvantaged. While

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US Highway 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study

bicyclists are legally entitled to most of the rights to the use of the roads enjoyed by motorists, roads in Pierson are generally not designed for shared use by motorists and bicyclists. The prevailing narrow lane widths do not allow motorists to pass slower moving bicyclists without crossing the centerline. This presents a hazardous condition, particularly on collector roads where traffic volumes and speeds tend to be highest. This condition can also result in travel delays for motorists and significant loss of road capacity.” Bicyclists riding on sidewalks are common in residential areas with young children. Sidewalks are generally not acceptable for commuter bicyclists; however inexperienced recreational bicyclists often use sidewalks if a bike lane is perceived as unsafe. The following describes the US HWY 17 corridor’s existing conditions and constraints. Refer to Existing Corridor Photos – Figure 2A-C for visual images relating to the existing corridor. The corridor presents different opportunities and constraints best described in sections starting from the south end and ending in the north. Hagstrom Road to Fourth Avenue (Refer to photo’s 1 - 10, Figure 2-A)  Rural section of road  ROW approximately 180’ from Hagstrom Road to south of Fourth Avenue  ROW width can accommodate sidewalks  Pedestrian crossing at Hagstrom not recommended due to limited visibility at curve in road, uncontrolled intersection and speeds exceeding 40 miles per hour (MPH)  Wide width commercial dirt driveway openings exist along corridor  No obstructions located within proposed path of the sidewalk  No curb and gutter on west side of road, 7-1/2 foot paved shoulder  Curb and gutter south of Fourth Avenue on the east side of road ends at private drive for Hagstrom Apartments then transitions to a 7-1/2 foot paved shoulder south to Hagstrom Road  Slight slopes to adjacent open drainage ditches exist along ROW  Grade change from edge of pavement north of Fourth Avenue to private drive at Hagstrom Apartments, elevation change +/- 2 feet  3-Stormwater manholes located along ROW within proposed path of sidewalk  Manholes +/- 6 feet from center to back of curb (TYP) Fourth Avenue to Second Avenue (Refer to photo’s 1 - 10, Figure 2-B)  ROW narrows to approximately 60 feet north of Fourth Avenue  Pavement width varies from 30 to 32 feet  ROW width on the east side varies from 10 to 12 feet to face of curb  ROW width on the west side varies from 20 to 22 feet to face of curb  Pedestrian crossings not recommended due to speeds exceeding 40 miles per hour (MPH) and uncontrolled intersections  Unmarked 5.5 foot bike lanes exist  3–Stormwater manholes were located along the ROW within the proposed path of the sidewalk  Manholes +/- 6 feet from center to back of curb (TYP)  No obstructions located within proposed path of the sidewalk

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         

US Highway 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study

Wide width concrete and dirt driveway openings exist along corridor No curb and gutter on west side of ROW to just south of Third Avenue One open drain crossing road without railing, both sides of ROW between Fourth Avenue and Third Avenue Grade change immediately north of Fourth Avenue, elevation change +/- 2 feet Fourth Avenue does not go through west of US HWY 17 Stop sign is set approximately 80 feet west along Third Avenue from US HWY 17. No stop sign at intersection Cemetery at corner of Third Avenue on east side of ROW Sidewalk ramps and detectable warning surface exists at all four corners of Second Avenue Yellow flashing light at intersection of Second Avenue Existing sidewalk begins north of Second Avenue on both sides of the ROW

Washington Avenue to First Avenue (Refer to photo’s 1-10, Figure 2-C)  Existing detectable warning surface at end of sidewalk curb ramps at all intersections  No curb and gutter along this segment of the corridor  West side of ROW limited, existing sidewalk on approximately 1 foot from edge of pavement  Approximately 10 feet of ROW on the east side from edge of pavement  Large and numerous driveway openings on east side; o approximately 52 foot first opening, o approximately 61 foot second opening, o and approximately 153 foot opening closest to First Avenue  A lighted pedestrian crossing and crosswalks exist at corner of Washington and US HWY 17 VI.

GENERAL DESIGN PRINCIPALS

The concept plan and typical cross sections included within this report were formulated based on the results of compiling data regarding existing conditions and applicable FDOT design guidelines. Study recommendations are based on design criteria for pedestrian facilities contained in the FDOT Pedestrian Facilities Planning and Design Handbook, the FDOT Plans Preparation Manual (PPM) and the Manual on Uniform Minimum Standards for Design, Construction and Maintenance for Streets and Highways, The Florida Greenbook. The following summarizes design guidelines applicable to this feasibility report. Horizontal Separation Sidewalks according to the Florida Pedestrian Planning and Design Handbook are defined as “paved area (typically concrete) which normally runs parallel to vehicular traffic and is separated from the road surface by at least a curb and gutter.” A sidewalk is designed for preferential or exclusive use by pedestrians. The number one goal in designing sidewalks shall be the elimination of vehicle-pedestrian conflicts. Though it is not possible to eliminate all vehicle-pedestrian conflicts within the typical roadway corridor, steps should be taken to minimize the effects of all vehicle-pedestrian conflicts through proper design. 1. The effective minimum width of a sidewalk within a residential area is 5 feet. A minimum width of 6 feet of horizontal clear zone is recommended for urban facilities where no curb and gutter is present. If 6 feet is not available, a “barrier” is recommended between the pedestrian way and the

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vehicular travel way. The definition of “barrier” may consist of curb and gutter, landscaping, or a permanent structure, such as railing or fencing. 2. To properly account for horizontal separation between the roadway and sidewalk, the design must, at a minimum, meet Florida Greenbook requirements. The Florida Greenbook states that sidewalks shall be separated from the travel lane of a rural (non-curbed) roadway based on the following criteria listed in order of desirability: a. Outside of the highway right-of-way in a separately dedicated corridor b. At or near the right-of-way line c. Outside of the designed roadside clear zone. d. Outside of the minimum required roadside clear zone e. As far from the edge of the driving lane as possible. 3. On curbed roadways, the minimum width of a sidewalk shall be 5 ft. when separated from the curb by a buffer strip. The minimum separation for a 5 ft. sidewalk from the back of curb is 2 ft. The buffer strip should be 6 ft. where possible to eliminate the need to narrow or reroute sidewalks around driveways. If the sidewalk is located adjacent to the curb, the minimum width of sidewalk is 6 ft. 4. The following guidelines will be useful in standardizing the identification and treatment of dropoff hazards for pedestrians and bicyclists. There are two cases that require shielding…a drop-off greater than 10 inches that is closer than 2 feet from the pedestrians’ or bicyclists’ pathway or edge of sidewalk is considered a hazard and shall be shielded. Also, a slope steeper than 1:2 (as called for in the plans) that begins closer than 2 feet from the pedestrians’ or bicyclists’ pathway or edge of sidewalk is considered a hazard and shall be shielded when the total drop-off is greater than 60 inches…. Installing fencing or railings are two ways to shield the drop-offs. Fencing is generally intended for use in rural areas along paths and trails. Standard railing is generally intended for urbanized areas, locations attaching to bridge rail or along concrete walkways. 5. Ideally, a 3 foot “shy” width should be provided behind the sidewalk for above ground utilities. Accessibility/Safety Curb ramps, maximum slopes, minimum widths, clear zones, and design treatments for the visually impaired, such as truncated domes, are design features that result in part from the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). These design features, when included in pedestrian facility planning, produce “ADA-compliant” facilities. 1. The Florida Greenbook states that curb ramps meeting the requirements of ADA Accessibility Guidelines and the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction shall be constructed at crosswalks at all intersections where curbs and sidewalks are constructed in order to give persons with disabilities safe access. 2. In general, proper design of pedestrian crossings shall consider the following: a. Crossings should be placed at locations with ample sight distances

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b. At crossings, the roadway should be free from changes in alignment or cross section c. The entire length of the crosswalk shall be visible to drivers at a sufficient distance to allow a stopping maneuver d. STOP bars shall be provided adjacent to all signalized crosswalks to inform drivers of the proper location to stop. The STOP bar should be well separated from the crosswalk, but should not be closer than 4 feet. e. All crosswalks shall be easily identified and clearly delineated, in accordance with Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) (Rule 14-15.010) 3. The single most important design consideration for persons with disabilities is curb cuts. Therefore, new and retrofitted streets with sidewalks should have curb cuts installed at all delineated crossings and it is desirable to provide separate ramps for each crosswalk at intersections with perpendicular approaches. Two curb cuts at each corner with a curb separating each ramp provides a greater amount of information to visually impaired pedestrians in street crossing designs. However a single uniform diagonal ramp including both crossings is also acceptable, when installed with truncated dome warning strips along the edge of the curb line. 4. Crossings shall also meet the same grade and cross slope requirements as sidewalks where the grade should not exceed 5%, and the maximum cross slope shall be no more than 2%. 5. Marked crosswalks shall be provided at all side streets where a pedestrian facility meets the roadway. 6. Marked crosswalks on an uncontrolled leg of an intersection shall be supplemented with other treatments (including beacons, curb extensions, raised medians, raised traffic islands, or enhanced overhead lighting) when any of the following conditions exist: 1. Where posted speeds are greater than 40 miles per hour (MPH). 7. All new facilities (and existing when possible) should have some degree of access control, since each point of access produces a traffic conflict. The control of access is one of the most effective, efficient, and economical methods for improving the capacity and safety characteristics of streets and highways. The reduction of the frequency of access points and the restriction of turning and crossing maneuvers, which should be primary objectives, is accomplished more effectively by the design of the roadway geometry than by the use of traffic control devices. Signage Pedestrian safety is maximized when drivers are aware of the crosswalk location and know when a pedestrian is attempting to cross. …... Flashing lights that are activated only when a pedestrian is attempting to cross can enhance crosswalk detection by motorists. The flashing lights, in conjunction with advanced warning signs for the lights, can provide the motorists with more warning of the crossing.

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US Highway 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study

1. A variety of intermittent lighting styles may be used, including: a. Flashing traffic signals over the crosswalk; b. Imbedded flashing lights in the crosswalk surface; and c. Flashing signals to warn motorists if pedestrians are present.

Exhibit 1. Imbedding lights in the asphalt at the edge of a crosswalk is a method for making crosswalks more visible to motorists.

2. Overhead flashing signals should be installed according to the MUTCD standards. The flashing in-pavement crosswalk lights are currently being tested for their effectiveness by FHWA as a new device and are not currently included in the MUTCD standards. 3. Additionally, signs and markings should be utilized whenever possible to provide the pedestrian clear direction. The signs and markings should conform to the standards set forth in the MUTCD. 4. Finally, illumination of the roadway should also provide sufficient lighting for the pedestrian facility. This is particularly important at pedestrian crossings or other areas of potential vehiclepedestrian conflict.

Exhibit 2. Alternative pedestrian crosswalk signage

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VII.

US Highway 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN RECOMMENDATIONS

In accordance with the opportunities and constraints described above and applicable industry design standards, the preferred sidewalk location and improvements has been determined for US HWY 17. The following outlines the feasible design recommendations for the project corridor depicted on Maps 1 – 4, Project Corridor Design Plans and Map 5, Cross Sections and Details. Right-of-way encroachments dictate the most feasible location of a sidewalk that is also most cost effective. Though adequate ROW exists along the corridor on both sides of the pavement, conflict points have been identified. Based on the data gathered, a 5 foot concrete sidewalk is proposed to be located 5 feet from the back of curb and 6 feet from edge of pavement. This design allows for adequate clear zone between the travel way and pedestrian traffic. Potential conflicts may arise along this proposed path that can be resolved by field relocation of obstacles. For instance, large trees and utility structures may be routed around as shown in the corridor design plans. Potential encroachment of private property was not noted during the site reconnaissance of the corridor. However a corridor specific survey for the study area should be completed prior to the development of a sidewalk design and engineering drawings. The following lists conceptual design recommendations for the corridor:  Construct sidewalk at grade such that it is ADA compliant.  Provide high-visibility crosswalk markings at all side street roadway crossings. All crosswalks should be six-feet wide at a minimum.  Avoid mid-block crosswalks at uncontrolled intersections.  Install pedestrian signage to existing flashing traffic signal over the crosswalk proposed to cross US HWY 17 at Second Avenue. Recommended to maximize awareness of the crosswalk location and when a pedestrian is attempting to cross.  Utilize additional signs and markings whenever possible to provide the pedestrian and motorist clear direction.  Provide ADA compliant sidewalk ramps at all new crosswalk locations.  Include detectable warning surface on curb cuts at all crosswalk locations.  Install longitudinal railing for the one open drain crossing located on both sides of ROW between Fourth Avenue and Third Avenue  Avoid existing utilities within the proposed path of the sidewalk.  Avoid trees within the proposed path of the sidewalk.  Provide concrete driveway aprons between US HWY 17 and the proposed sidewalk at all asphalt and gravel driveways.  Increase concrete thickness of the sidewalk to six inches at driveway crossings and areas subject to vehicular crossing to discourage breakage caused by the excessive weight of vehicles.  Construct longitudinal grade of the sidewalk to be less than five percent if practicable. In the event that the longitudinal grade exceeds five percent, then the sidewalk should be designed in accordance with chapter four of the ADA guidelines (28 CFR part 36).  Construct curb and gutter along the west side of US HWY 17 south of Third Avenue to extent of existing curb on east side of ROW in order to be consistent with existing construction. Proper drainage inlets, pipe, and outfalls should be designed accordingly at all curbed locations.

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    VIII.

US Highway 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study

Construct curb and gutter along the east side of US HWY 17 between First Avenue and Washington Avenue in order to be consistent with existing construction. Proper drainage inlets, pipe, and outfalls should be designed accordingly at all curbed locations. Add marking and signage as part of the existing bike lanes from Fourth Avenue to Washington Avenue. Improve pedestrian safety by closing driveway openings along First and Washington, and Hagstrom and Fourth. Move existing stop sign location on the west side of Third Avenue closer to intersection at US HWY 17. Install stop bars and pedestrian crosswalks at all roadway crossings as shown on Maps 1 – 4. FINANCIAL FEASIBILITY

Table 1 provides an Engineer’s Opinion of Probable Cost to construct and maintain the proposed corridor based on FDOT 2011 Basis of Estimates Handbook. The item number and unit of measure are based on the FDOT Basis of Estimates manual. The following definitions were utilized to determine cost basis for the estimated work. The estimate does not include utility relocations that are found to be necessary during the final design process. This estimate is based primarily upon the FDOT 12 Month Moving Average Item Unit Cost Report for Area 6, with costs through 11/30/2012. The unit costs from the FDOT report were then increased based on an inflation factor of five percent to bring them to year 2012 costs. Cost projections have been shown for sequential years up to 2015 based on a unit cost annual increase based on an inflation factor of five percent. As shown on Table 1, the total estimated cost for design and construction of the sidewalks along US HWY 17 corridor as discussed in this report for the year 2012 is $789,520.00.        



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Clearing and Grubbing – This Item is included to account for the clearing that is necessary to build the sidewalk. Removal of Existing Concrete Pavement –This item is included to account for the removal of existing pavement in areas where concrete aprons must be reconstructed. Turnout Construction – This item is included to account for the construction of a driveway apron between the sidewalk and the roadway. Picket Railing – This item is included to account for the construction of a pedestrian railing to guard against hazardous field conditions. Curb & Gutter Conc (Type F) –This item is included to replace existing curb where sidewalk ramps must be cut. Sidewalk Conc (4” Thick) –This item is included to account for the cost of placing the majority of the sidewalk along the proposed route. The sidewalk ramps are also included in this cost. Sidewalk Conc (6” Thick) –This item is included to account for the cost of placing the sidewalk in areas with traffic bearing situations. Detectable Warning Surface – This item is included as an ADA compliant feature included within all sidewalk ramps. This item accounts for retrofitting existing sidewalk ramps with detectable warning surfaces. Performance Turf, Sod – This item is included to sod all areas disturbed by construction of the proposed sidewalk.

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  

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Thermoplastic, Std, White, Solid, 12” and 24” - These items are included to mark the special emphasis crosswalks, as detailed in the FDOT Design Standards, Index 17346. Single Post Sign, F&I, Less than 12 SF – This item is included for the pedestrian crosswalk signage, and various additional signs throughout the project Single Post Sign, Relocate – This item accounts for the relocation of signage along the corridor.

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IX.

US Highway 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study

DATA COLLECTION REFERENCES

Data collection consisted of referencing readily available information including:           

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The Volusia County MPO Bicycle/Pedestrian Plan, January 25, 2005 Volusia County, http://www.volusia.org/ Volusia TPO, http://www.volusiatpo.org/ Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), http://www.dot.state.fl.us/ Florida Pedestrian Planning and Design Handbook, FDOT, 1999 Manual of Uniform Minimum Standards for Design, Construction and Maintenance for Streets and Highways, May 2007 American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Guide for the Planning, Design, and Operation of Pedestrian Facilities, 2004 FDOT Plans Preparation Manual (PPM), January 2009 FDOT 2011 Basis of Estimates Handbook ADA Standards for Accessible Design, Code of Federal Regulations, 28 CFR Part 36, Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD), 2009

April 2012

Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.

US Highway 17 (Center Street) Sidewalk Feasibility Study

FIGURES AND MAPS

Page 16

April 2012

Source: Microsoft Streets and Trips, 2011

N SITE

Proposed sidewalk location

LEGEND Proposed Sidewalk Location

LOCATION MAP © 2012 Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. 445 24th Street, Suite 200 Vero Beach, FL 32960 Phone (772) 794-4100 Fax (772) 794-4130 www.kimley-horn.com

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BICYCLE / PEDESTRIAN FEASIBILITY STUDY US HWY 17, PIERSON, FL SCALE:

NTS

PROJECT NO

147269000

January 2012

FIGURE 1

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Page 19

Page 20

0

50

100

SCALE AS SHOWN

1ST AVENUE

PIERSON ELEMENTARY

US HWY 17

WASHINGTON AVENUE

1st Avenue to Washington Avenue Page 21

Bicycle / Pedestrian Feasibility Study US Hwy 17, Pierson, Florida AS SHOWN

147269000

January 2012

MAP 1

0

100

200

SCALE AS SHOWN

2ND AVENUE

ECHO STREET

US HWY 17 35 MPH

3RD AVENUE

CEMETARY

3rd Avenue to 2nd Avenue Page 22

Bicycle / Pedestrian Feasibility Study US Hwy 17, Pierson, Florida AS SHOWN

147269000

January 2012

MAP 2

0

100

200

SCALE AS SHOWN

AUTO PARTS AND SERVICES

IGLESIA MISIONERA

US HWY 17 35 MPH

4th Avenue to 3rd Avenue Page 23

3RD AVENUE

4TH AVENUE

CROSBY REALTY

Bicycle / Pedestrian Feasibility Study US Hwy 17, Pierson, Florida AS SHOWN

147269000

January 2012

MAP 3

0

200

400

SCALE AS SHOWN

PIERSON RESTAURANT

PH 45 M

PIERSON SUPPLY

ENTRANCE TO HAGSTROM APTS.

HAGSTROM ROAD

W US H

Y 17

45

Hagstrom Road to 4th Avenue Page 24

Bicycle / Pedestrian Feasibility Study US Hwy 17, Pierson, Florida AS SHOWN

147269000

January 2012

MAP 4

Bicycle / Pedestrian Feasibility Study US Hwy 17, Pierson, Florida Page 25

AS SHOWN

147269000

January 2012

MAP 5