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Supporting Our Disabled Colleagues

Internal, Supporting Disabled Colleagues, Version1, Page 1 of 13

Where to find things. Introduction .............................................................................................................................................................. 3

1.

Why do we have this guide? ............................................................................................................................. 3

2.

What is the Equality Act? ................................................................................................................................. 3

3.

What’s the definition of ‘disability’ under the Equality Act? ......................................................................... 3

4.

What should I be aware of if I am recruiting? .................................................................................................. 4

5.

As a manager does someone need to tell me if they’re disabled? ..................................................................5

6.

How do I know if someone is disabled or not? ................................................................................................ 5

7.

If I think someone is disabled should I manage them differently? ................................................................. 5

8.

What do I need to think about when managing someone with a disability or health condition? ................. 6

9.

What are reasonable adjustments? ................................................................................................................. 6

10.

When do I need to consider making an adjustment and what kind of adjustments can I make? .............. 7

11.

What does the legislation mean by reasonable? ......................................................................................... 8

12.

Do I need to consider making adjustments for colleagues who have caring responsibilities? ................. 8

13.

What’s the process for making a reasonable adjustment(s)? .................................................................... 8

14.

What additional support can we get when making adjustments? ........................................................... 10

15.

How should I document what adjustments have been agreed? ............................................................... 11

16.

Should adjustments be reviewed? ............................................................................................................. 11

17.

Do I need to keep information regarding disabilities confidential? ......................................................... 11

18.

What do I need to think about when managing performance?................................................................. 11

19.

What do I need to think about when conducting an investigation? ......................................................... 11

20.

What do I need to think about when conducting a progress review? ...................................................... 12

21.

What are my responsibilities as a manager? ............................................................................................. 12

22.

What should I do with specialist equipment if a colleague leaves?.......................................................... 12

23.

Useful contacts ........................................................................................................................................... 12

Guide information. ................................................................................................................................................. 13 Guide owner: [email protected] .............................................................................................. 13 Ownership and confidentiality .............................................................................................................................. 13

Internal, Supporting Disabled Colleagues, Version1, Page 2 of 13

Introduction

Act. The aim of the Act is to protect people who have one of the nine protected characteristics from discrimination

This guide gives you information about the Equality Act

and harassment and this includes preventing disability

and specifically about how we should recruit, work with or

discrimination.

manage someone who may be disabled or have an underlying health condition. It also tells you what to think

3.

about when you’re considering making adjustment(s), and

What’s the definition of ‘disability’ under the Equality Act?

what process you should follow when making them. The Equality Act defines a disability as a ‘mental or

1.

Why do we have this guide?

physical impairment which has a substantial and longterm adverse effect on the colleague’s ability to carry out

We have this guide to help you manage and support

normal day-to-day activities’. Long term usually means

anyone in your team who has a disability or underlying

that the condition must last or be likely to last for more

health condition, so they’re able to carry out their job to

than 12 months.

the best of their ability and meet the requirements we need in our roles. We want to create a safe, supportive

Within the Equality Act a person’s disability is known as

and inclusive working environment for all our colleagues

an ‘impairment’.

and therefore it’s important that we understand any challenges our colleagues may face when working for us,

‘Physical or mental conditions’

and try to address these as best we can. Physical impairment isn’t defined in the legislation.

A

Under the Equality Act we have a duty to consider and

mental impairment may result from, or consist of, a

make reasonable adjustment(s) for any candidate or

mental illness (e.g. schizophrenia) or disorder (learning

colleague who is disabled to ensure that they are not at a

difficulties), but it doesn’t have to be clinically recognised.

substantial disadvantage to other on-disabled colleagues.

‘Substantial long-term adverse effect’ This guide outlines the process that should be followed for making an adjustment(s) for colleagues who are:

The impairment is long term if it lasts or is likely to last for at least 12 months, or if it is likely to last for the rest of a

   

Known to have a disability or underlying health

person’s life. In each case this will depend on the precise

condition at recruitment / offer stage.

circumstances.

Absent and returning to work with any form of disability or underlying health condition.

Substantial and adverse means more than ‘minor’ or

Existing colleagues who have a disability or

‘trivial’, and takes into account the time needed to carry

underlying health condition and request adjustments.

out an activity, and the difficulty experienced compared to

Existing colleagues who have become disabled as a

someone without the impairment.

result of an accident or health condition.

account the cumulative effects on activities. For example,

It also takes into

a person may have minor adverse effect to dexterity, This guide also talks about our partnerships with external

physical coordination and the ability to concentrate, but

organisations such as Access to Work and Remploy who

when added together it becomes a substantial problem.

can help if a colleague’s health or disability affects the

It also covers progressive conditions such as HIV,

way they do their job. They can also provide advice and

multiple sclerosis and cancer, once diagnosed.

support on issues or concerns which may arise.

2.

‘Normal day to day activities’

What is the Equality Act? There is no specific definition of this but examples are:

The Equality Act 2010 deals with most discrimination issues in employment, and replaced a number of different



mobility (difficulty in walking around)

pieces of legislation including the Disability Discrimination



manual dexterity (using buttons)

Internal, Supporting Disabled Colleagues, Version1, Page 3 of 13



physical coordination (inability to place an object accurately without assistance or hard concentration);

Conditions controlled by medication or special aids



frequent incontinence



ability to lift, carry or move everyday objects (inability

A person with an impairment, which would meet the test

to pick up everyday objects of moderate weight with

for disability

one hand)

other means, comes within the definition of a disabled

speech, hearing or eyesight (taking significantly

person, e.g. epilepsy or diabetes which is controlled by

longer to say things, inability to hear a clear

drugs, or a person with an artificial limb. This definition

conversation over the telephone, total inability to

doesn’t apply to people with impaired eyesight which is

distinguish colours or walk safely around without

corrected by glasses or contact lenses.



but which is controlled by medication or

bumping into things) 

ability to concentrate (inability to complete a task

Conditions not to be treated as impairments

without assistance or confused behaviour) 

memory, ability to learn or understand (inability to

As well as those already mentioned, the Regulations

remember names or familiar colleagues, customers

categorise these as;

etc., inability to adapt after thorough and persistent training) 

perception of the risk of physical danger (inability to operate

properly

maintained

equipment

safely

through fear)



addiction to alcohol, nicotine or any other substance



a tendency to set fires, steal or physically or sexually abuse others



exhibitionism or voyeurism



hay fever (however, where hay fever aggravates

Progressive conditions

another condition e.g. asthma which becomes an impairment the hay fever can be taken into account)

Special circumstances apply to people who suffer from progressive conditions and certain specific condition such

It’s important to remember that a disability can be

as cancer, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, AIDS

something which is visible and easy to recognise like

and so on. Some progressive conditions will fall within

something which affects mobility or a visual impairment,

the definition of disability, if the condition they have been

or it may be something which is invisible and not very

diagnosed with, has or is expected to have, any effect on

easy to recognise, like dyslexia, depression or a learning

them carrying our normal day to day activities, even if the

difficulty. Someone may not always think (or like to think)

effect is not substantial.

of themselves as “disabled”, even if their condition is recognised as a disability under the Equality Act.

Severe disfigurements

Things to consider

A severe disfigurement which is treated as having a substantial adverse effect on a person’s ability to carry

While medical evidence might be helpful to tribunals in

out normal day to day activities comes within the

deciding whether or not a person is disabled, it’s the

definition of a disabled person.

Once a person has

tribunals rather than the medical witnesses that must

shown that they have a severe disfigurement, e.g. scars,

decide whether a colleague meets the definition of

birthmarks, skin disease etc., they would be covered

disability; medical evidence is helpful but ultimately we

under the Act.

must carry out our own assessment, and not solely rely

However, people with deliberately

acquired disfigurements such as tattoos and body piercing for decorative, or other non-medical purposes don’t come within the definition of a disabled person.

on medical evidence.

4.

What should I be aware of if I am recruiting?

We have signed up to the Governments ‘two ticks’ initiative, which means that we are positive about disabled applicants and have made a commitment to; Internal, Supporting Disabled Colleagues, Version1, Page 4 of 13





Interview all disabled applicants who meet the

For candidates who may struggle to complete the

minimum criteria for a job vacancy and to consider

situational judgement test, support is available from

them on their abilities.

charity partners such as Remploy and the Shaw Trust

Discuss with disabled employees, at any time but at

(listed under ‘Useful Contacts’ at the end of this

least once a year, what you can both do to make

document).

sure they can develop and use their abilities. 



Make every reasonable effort when colleagues

Under no circumstances should candidates be asked

become disabled to make sure they stay in

questions about their health condition/disability during the

employment.

interview process – all decisions should be purely based

To take action to ensure that all colleagues develop

on an individual’s skills and ability to do the job.

the appropriate level of disability awareness needed 

to make these commitments work.

To help protect us against any claims of discrimination

Centrally review these commitments every year and

notes from all interviews/assessments should be kept for

assess what has been achieved, plan ways to

at least 12 months at which point they can be destroyed

improve on them and let colleagues and Jobcentre

confidentially.

Plus know about progress and future plans.

5.

When candidates apply online they are given the option to self-declare that they consider themselves to have a disability. If they self-declare this creates an automatic flag on the system.

As a manager does someone need to tell me if they’re disabled?

No, a colleague doesn’t need to inform us that they are disabled; it’s their choice to do so. However, if you think a colleague is, or might be disabled, we have a duty of

For stores, distribution, customer fulfillment and

care towards them, even if they haven’t formally told us

engagement

and therefore need to ensure reasonable adjustments are

centres

-

once

the

candidate

has

completed the situational judgement test and they have met the required ‘pass mark’, anyone displaying the flag should be invited in for interview, as per the two ticks

considered.

6.

commitment.

How do I know if someone is disabled or not?

If a colleague’s condition fits the definition of disability as For the office - anyone who reaches the minimum criteria for the role and is displaying the flag should be invited in for interview, as per the two ticks commitment detailed above.

disabled. However, we can only use and work with the information available to us to make our own decision when considering or making adjustments. Ultimately it’s

Please be aware that this flag can only be viewed by the People Manager who will be shortlisting candidates and inviting them in for interview/assessment. When any interview/assessment is being arranged you should always ask the candidate if they require any reasonable adjustments to help and support them attend or during the interview process (even if they have not selfdeclared at application stage).

defined by the Act, they are likely to be classed as

the tribunal who must decide whether or not they meeting the definition of disability. Under no circumstances should you ever assume or decide whether someone is or isn’t disabled as this is not for us to determine.

7.

If I think someone is disabled should I manage them differently?

This can include

adjustments to the scoring mechanisms used for SHL

No, but you must take into consideration their potential

assessments, for example for someone who has learning

disability, and where appropriate make adjustments for

difficulties or dyslexia.

them, but you should still continue to manage them as you would any other colleague. It can be more damaging to avoid managing a potential disabled employee, than to Internal, Supporting Disabled Colleagues, Version1, Page 5 of 13

deal with any issues they may have in carrying out their

9.

What are reasonable adjustments?

role. If you see someone struggling to carry out their role, it’s important that we talk to them to see if we can support

The Equality Act places a duty on us to make reasonable

them.

adjustment(s) to accommodate disabled people and to help them overcome the practical effects of their disability.

8.

What do I need to think about when managing someone with a disability or health condition?

This is one of the most important parts of the legislation as it puts an obligation on us to think about removing anything which disadvantages a colleague, or candidate with an impairment from applying for and/or completing

If you’ve got someone in your team who has a disability

their job.

or underlying health condition you need to make sure you do everything you reasonably can do to support them.

The duty applies where anything we do (e.g. making interview arrangements) or where the physical aspects of

This could be things such as:

the building (e.g. no lift/ramp access), places a disabled colleague or candidate at a substantial disadvantage to a



A more in depth and tailored induction if they are

person who isn’t disabled.

new to your team and have learning difficulties which



would make the normal induction hard for them to

Failing to make reasonable adjustments is one of the

follow.

most common types of disability discrimination and if

Setting up a buddy for someone who may have a

adjustments are ‘reasonable’ we must make them.

visual impairment to help them navigate the 

building(s)/store.

We have a duty to make sure that we have processes in

Providing verbal instructions rather than printed

place to prevent disability discrimination in:

copies for people with learning disabilities or visual 



impairment.



recruitment and selection

Assessing vacancies to see if minor elements could



determining pay, terms and conditions

be moved to another role if it would prevent a



sickness absence

disabled person from applying or being offered the



training and development

role.



promotion

Ensuring that any social events or work functions are



dismissal

suitable for everyone in your team and don’t exclude



redundancy

anyone from attending or taking part. Our duty arises on a case by case basis in relation to a It’s important that you have regular conversations with

particular disabled colleague or candidate. Therefore if

anyone in your team who is disabled or has an underling

we don’t know, and couldn’t be reasonably expected to

health issue to understand their condition and how it

know, that a disabled person is an applicant for a job or

impacts them on a daily basis.

Never make an

that a colleague is disabled, or that the person has (or

assumption on what a person can or can’t do or how they

has had) a disability and is likely to be placed at a

might do it.

substantial

Always ask the person to tell you or to

disadvantage,

then

it

wouldn’t

be

demonstrate how they can best perform certain tasks.

discrimination not to make adjustments. However, if there

Always discuss and consider all reasonable adjustment

are signs that the colleague may be disabled then you

requests and implement where appropriate.

should

This way

you can make sure you don’t do anything which could

be

aware

of

adjustments.

potentially exclude them; even if it wasn’t your intention to do so.

Internal, Supporting Disabled Colleagues, Version1, Page 6 of 13

this

and

consider

making

10.

When do I need to consider making an adjustment and what kind of adjustments can I make?

Some examples of adjustments you may have to consider. 

An adjustment can be absolutely anything from giving a

structural or physical changes such as widening a

colleague more breaks or reduced duties, to completely changing the entrance of a building. Our duty under the Act is “to take any steps as is reasonable, in order to prevent any arrangement or physical features of the

doorway for a wheelchair.  

which gets worse, so they can’t carry on with their

‘reasonable adjustments’. This means that we may need

current job, and there is no reasonable adjustment

to make adjustment(s) to any of the arrangements we

which would enable them to do so, then the

have in place to allow us to employ someone or

colleague might have to be considered for any

adjustments to our actual buildings.

suitable alternative roles which are available. 

Altering the colleagues working hours – for example, allowing the colleague to work flexible hours to enable additional breaks to overcome tiredness.

‘Arrangements’ mean;



Assigning the colleague a different place of work (this could be another store or location) if the first

Any arrangement made for deciding who to offer

building is inaccessible.

employment to. 

Transferring the colleague to fill an existing vacancy – if a colleague becomes disabled or has a disability

disadvantage” – this is what is termed the duty to make



Allocating some of the colleague’s duties to another person.

building that places the disabled person at a substantial

Arrangements

Making adjustments to premises – this could include

Any term, condition or arrangements on which



Allowing the colleague to be absent during working hours for rehabilitation, assessment or treatment –

employment, promotion, a transfer, training or any

for example to attend physiotherapy, psychoanalysis

benefit is offered.

or understand employment rehabilitation. The duty will therefore apply in recruitment, for example,



Giving

or arranging for the colleague to have

training – this could be training in the use of

during selection and interview procedures, and during

particular equipment unique to the colleague, or

employment, for example, in contractual arrangements

training appropriate for all employees but where

and working conditions.

needs alternating because of the disability. 

Physical features

Acquiring or modifying equipment – for example, providing specifically adapted keyboard for a visually

The meaning of ‘physical features’ is set out in the

impaired person. There is no requirement to provide

Equality Act, and states that the items below are treated

or

as physical features (whether they’re permanent or

unconnected with work.

temporary);



modify

equipment

for

personal

purposes

Modify instructions or reference manuals – for example, instructions for people with learning

   

Any feature arising from the design of construction of

difficulties may need to be given verbally with a

a building on the premises.

demonstration.

Any features on the premises of any approach to,



Modifying procedures for testing or assessment – for

exit from or access to such a building.

example, a person with restricted manual dexterity

Any fixtures, fittings, furnishing, furniture, equipment

might be disadvantaged by a written test, so we

or materials in or on the premises.

might need to consider giving that person a verbal

Any other physical element or quality of any land within the premises.

test instead. 

Providing a confidential place to take mediation where identified as necessary.



Allowing the colleague extra time where appropriate to carry out certain tasks.

Internal, Supporting Disabled Colleagues, Version1, Page 7 of 13

Other adjustments to think about:

possible, to reach an agreement with the colleague that enables them to stay in employment.

Any cases of



providing additional supervision

refusing to make an adjustment must be discussed with



training for other people in disability issues or in the

your Group People Manager or People Business Partner

use of equipment

in the first instance.



providing support and access to external support



additional support services for colleagues, for

12.

example: o

travel buddy’s (someone to travel to work

Do I need to consider making adjustments for colleagues who have caring responsibilities?

with) o

Yes, if you have someone who has a caring responsibility

voice to text support for deaf colleagues

for someone with a disability or health condition you make In some cases a combination of adjustments may be

need to consider making reasonable adjustments. Each

needed.

case will need to be assessed on its own facts and a decision made.

Co-operation of other colleagues However some of the things you should take into In some cases an adjustment won’t work without the help of other colleagues, and as part of the adjustment we’ll be responsible for getting their co-operation. Therefore, we may have to explain the nature of adjustments to other colleagues to ensure that they understand what the adjustment is and how they can help. Remember to be careful not to share confidential information without the



Are they the primary carer?



Do they live with the colleague?



What additional support does the person have?



What level of care is required?



Are there options for the colleague to work flexibly or have a formal flexible working arrangement?

colleagues consent though.

11.

consideration are:



What does the legislation mean by reasonable?

Could we grant a lifestyle break whilst the colleague makes additional caring arrangements?

Whilst we need to consider and make any reasonable This is not defined in the legislation and given the diverse

adjustments where we can, we do have the option to

nature of disabilities, it’s very difficult to generalise about

refuse where it is something that we simply cannot

when it’s reasonable for us to make an adjustment, and

accommodate or it has a significant operational impact.

each case will need to be looked at on its own facts. It’s

However, we do need to consider the impact a refusal will

often possible to make very effective adjustments, which

have on the colleague’s ability to carry on working,

are of considerable benefit to disabled people, at very

especially if they are the primary carer.

little cost using the resources available, and with little or no disruption.

However, even if there is a cost

implication, we may still need to make the adjustment to

13.

What’s the process for making a reasonable adjustment(s)?

fulfill our duty under the Act. Each request for an adjustment(s) should be assessed on Due to the size and nature of our business it may be

a case by case basis, and the assessment type varies

difficult not to accommodate adjustments, even if there is

depending on what the adjustment is and whether the

a substantial cost implication. However, we do have the

person is a new starter, returning from sickness absence

option to refuse, where it is something that we simply

or an existing colleague with a potential disability or

cannot accommodate or it has a significant operational

underlying health condition.

impact. If we are unable to make an adjustment(s) we should

ensure

alternatives

and

that

we

fully

candidate/colleague.

have

considered

discussed

these

all/any

with

the

Ultimately we should try, where Internal, Supporting Disabled Colleagues, Version1, Page 8 of 13

Adjustments which can implemented at a local level

be

agreed

and

Agreed adjustments like this either for equipment or to property will be funded through a central budget.

Colleagues with a disability or underlying health condition, who need adjustments to enable them to work, should

Candidates who say they have a disability at recruitment/offer stage

talk to their manager/People Manager or Partner about You may be able to provide the

New starters are asked during the recruitment process

adjustments through changing working practices or

whether there is anything we need to do differently or any

processes, hours of work or the tasks you give them.

adjustment(s) that we need to consider to help them to

Any adjustments should be considered in conjunction with

come to work. In most circumstances, this should give us

advice/support from Occupational Health and the People

time to assess,

Team, where appropriate.

adjustments before their start date.

All requests for adjustments should be captured in writing

If a new starter states that there are adjustments that

(e-mail is fine) and kept for your records. Once agreed

need to be considered the Hiring Manager will pass the

they should be documented on the adjustment passport a

details to the relevant People Manager/Partner who

copy of which should be held on the colleague’s

should contact Access to Work with the colleague to get

personnel file.

an assessment within the first six weeks. Access to Work

their requirements.

plan,

and make any necessary

can be contacted 0345 268 8489 or by e-mail on If the adjustment has an impact on the colleagues

[email protected]

working hours, you must notify payroll to get the payroll system updated. If the colleague indicates that they

Access to Work can cover all of the agreed costs to help

require specialist equipment that can’t be sourced locally

overcome disability issues if the colleague:

or ordered via click to order, the People Manager/Partner should support the colleague in contacting Access to



is about to start paid employment, or

Work for an assessment.

Access to Work can be



has been employed for less than six weeks when

contacted

8489

on 0345

268

or

by e-mail

they apply for help

on

[email protected] Once a report has been received from Access to Work, if this indicates that

If the employee has been employed for six weeks or

company funding is required, the People Manager should

more, we will have to help pay some of these costs.

contact Occupational Health on 01992 806650 for further advice.

Colleagues who ask for adjustments during absence or returning to work following absence

If you are unsure whether to make an adjustment or need contact

Before considering whether to make adjustment, you

Occupational Health on 01992 2806650 or e-mail

should make sure you have all the information and advice

[email protected]

you need from either:

Adjustments which are relating to the physical features of the building or specialist equipment.



more

information

on the

process

please

Fit for Work or Occupational Health who will be able to provide advice on suggested workplace adjustments to support the colleague back to or in

Any adjustments which are required to buildings or

work and also obtain additional information, if

involve ordering specialist equipment must be referred to

needed,

Access to Work for assessment and referred to Property

Remember to get the colleague’s verbal consent

and Occupational Health once their report is received.

before making any referral to Fit for Work or

on

the

colleague’s

requirements.

Occupational Health as agreed, or Any request for funding of equipment or property will be considered by Occupational Health.



The colleague’s doctor may be able to provide a fit note and give suggestions regarding adjustments if

Internal, Supporting Disabled Colleagues, Version1, Page 9 of 13

asked to support the colleague either in work or

To be eligible for help, colleagues must;

their return to work.  When necessary, Occupational Health will ask you to

have a disability or health condition that has a long term substantial adverse effect on their ability to

support the colleague in contacting and arranging an

carry out their job

Access to Work assessment or they may request an



be over 16 years old

external provider to arrange an assessment, and discuss



be in or about to start paid employment

the requirements with the colleague,



not be claiming incapacity benefit or employment support allowance once they are in work

From the information you have, you need to assess whether you can agree and implement the adjustment

Applying to Access to Work

locally or whether you need to refer this to Occupational Health. If you’re managing the absence through a formal

Colleagues can contact Access to Work directly to make

process you should talk to your People Manager/Partner

an application.

for further advice.

been collected, Access to Work will send the colleague

Once all the relevant information has

the forms for completion and return.

Colleagues who request a change to their current adjustments

Access to Work can be contacted 0345 268 8489 or by email on [email protected]

If a colleague is requesting a change and/or a new adjustment which can’t be agreed and accommodated at

Advisor Contact

a local level, Occupational Health should be contacted for further advice.

Once an application is received, an Access to Work advisor will contact the colleague by phone (unless

For those colleagues who become disabled as a result of

another contact method has been specified) to discuss

an accident or health condition where the Manager or

the next course of action and arrange and assessment, if

People

agree

required. The assessment will be carried out by a fully

adjustments, Occupational Health should be contacted to

qualified and experienced assessor, and a report will be

discuss the case and where necessary refer the

returned to the Access to Work advisor within 10 working

colleague for further assessment to understand what

days.

Manager/Partner

are

unable

to

adjustments we should consider to enable the colleague to remain at or return work.

Remploy

14.

If the colleague is struggling to do their job due a health

What additional support can we get when making adjustments?

condition but hasn’t had a diagnosis, you can refer them to Remploy who will offer support without a full prognosis.

Access to Work

If you are going to contact Remploy directly, it’s a good idea to speak to Occupational Health first as they may be

Access to Work is a specialist disability service delivered

able to support you without the need to contact Remploy.

by the government. Access to Work can help colleagues if their health or disability affects the way they do their job,

Access to Work may choose to refer to Remploy who

and can give advice to both the colleague and Tesco, and

offer a range of services to make it easier to support and

support with extra costs, which may arise because of their

keep colleagues who have a disability or underlying

needs.

health condition in employment.

Internal, Supporting Disabled Colleagues, Version1, Page 10 of 13

15.

How should I document adjustments have been agreed?

what

has epilepsy and works in a store we may have to tell other member of the team about the effects of the condition and the methods of assisting them in order for

It’s important to keep a record of any conversation you

the disabled person to work safely in the store.

have with the colleague about:

should discuss this with the colleague in question and

You

check that they have no objection before disclosing the



what adjustments they need



any adjustment that are put in place



any reviews of adjustment that have been put in

As an employer we shouldn’t normally reveal information

place

about a disabled colleague if we wouldn’t reveal the same

information.

information about another person for an equally legitimate Any agreed adjustments must be recorded on the Adjustment Passport Form and kept confidential.

The

purpose, unless we have the colleagues consent to do so.

adjustment passport is a document where you can document agreed adjustments, capture notes about the colleague’s

condition

and

document

when

the

18.

What do I need to think about when managing performance?

adjustments should be reviewed. As we don’t record adjustments centrally it’s a great way of documenting

If you’re supporting under performance it’s important to

what’s been agreed between you and the colleague and

consider

both of you should keep a copy. Both you and the

contributory factor.

colleague should keep a copy.

discussion with them to understand the reasons for under

16.

Should adjustments be reviewed?

whether

the

colleague’s

disability

is

a

You should have an informal

performance and consider any adjustments you need to be made. For example:

Yes; it’s important to have regular reviews to ensure that



additional or more in depth training;

any adjustments which have been made are appropriate



repeating initial training or delivering this in a different

for the colleague’s condition, and to help ensure that the

way e.g. demonstrating something rather than giving

colleague is working to the best of his or her ability.

written instructions

During your regular conversations or Progress Reviews,



breaking down tasks into smaller pieces/sections

talk about how effective the adjustments that are in place



giving them longer to perform certain task;

have been and whether any changes need to be



moving a specific task that they find particularly

considered.

difficult to another colleague 

As a general rule we would expect adjustments to be

agreeing a bespoke action plan with them to help improve their performance

reviewed at least every six months; however in some circumstances it may be appropriate to review them more

19.

regularly.

17.

Do I need to keep information regarding disabilities confidential?

Yes, it’s important that we keep information about a colleague’s disability or health condition confidential and this

includes

adjustments.

any

information

about

reasonable

This may sometimes be difficult as you

What do I need to think about when conducting an investigation?

If you’re conducting an investigation for disciplinary or a performance related situation, then it’s important to try and identify if the colleague’s disability is contributory factor. For example, disability may cause changes to a person’s physical or mental ability such as a lack of concentration.

might need to tell someone about an adjustment and the reason for it, or involve other people in making the change.

You should only tell those people who

absolutely need to know. For example, where a person Internal, Supporting Disabled Colleagues, Version1, Page 11 of 13

20.

What do I need to think about when conducting a progress review?

Enham - provides a range of services to enable disabled people with support to gain the skills and knowledge to enter and remain in employment.

When you’re measuring performance it’s important to take into account any impact the colleagues disability, or

Rathbone Training - educate, train and rehabilitate

disability related absence may have had on their

young people and adults who through learning difficulties

performance as not to disadvantage them.

are unable to gain employment or who wish to further

21.

What are my responsibilities as a manager?

Your responsibility is to ensure that all of our colleagues are treated fairly when it comes to accessing training and development, employment procedures and benefits, workplace events and activities and their day to day interactions with colleagues and customers.

REMPLOY via the JobCentre is the UK's leading supplier of

employment

opportunities

for

disabled

think is discriminatory or amounts to bullying or harassment you should deal with it in an appropriate manner. This type of behaviour will not be tolerated and is considered to be gross misconduct and if you fail to deal with it, then disciplinary action may also be taken against you.

providing jobs and training.

Shaw Trust is a national charity that provides training and work opportunities for people who are disadvantaged in circumstances.

Related Reading Disciplinary Policy Equal Opportunities and Diversity Policy Grievance Policy Supporting Disabled Colleagues

What should I do with specialist equipment if a colleague leaves?

Supporting Colleagues’ – Age, Race, Sex and Marriage and Civil Partnership Supporting Trans Colleagues

Please

contact

Occupational

Health

on

Supporting Colleagues’ Religion and Belief Supporting Colleagues’ Sexual Orientation

[email protected] for further advice.

Northern Ireland Equality Statement

23.

Useful contacts

Association of Disabled Professionals - Aims to improve

the

education

rehabilitation,

training

and

employment opportunities available to disabled people.

Business

people,

the workplace due to disability, ill health or other social

If you hear comments or see any behaviour which you

22.

their education.

Disability

Forum

is

the

employers'

organisation focused on the issue of disability in the workplace.

Internal, Supporting Disabled Colleagues, Version1, Page 12 of 13

Guide information. Version No. 1

Date of change th

8 February 2016

Summary of change Updated document

Guide owner: [email protected] Ownership and confidentiality This document shouldn’t be shared with anyone externally without permission from your Director. This policy and any associated documentation remains the property of Tesco and should be returned if requested.

Internal, Supporting Disabled Colleagues, Version1, Page 13 of 13