Supporting Our Trans Colleagues - Our Tesco


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Supporting Our Trans Colleagues

Internal, Supporting Our Trans Colleagues, Version1, Page 1 of 11

Where to find things. Introduction .............................................................................................................................................................. 3 Key terms .................................................................................................................................................................. 3 1.

How is gender defined? .................................................................................................................................... 3

2.

How is crossdressing defined? ......................................................................................................................... 3

3.

How is transgender defined? ........................................................................................................................... 3

4.

How is transsexual defined? ............................................................................................................................ 3

5.

How is non-binary defined? ............................................................................................................................. 4

6.

What are our legal obligations? ....................................................................................................................... 4

7.

At what point does the Equality Act apply? .................................................................................................... 5

8.

What should I be aware of when someone is transitioning?........................................................................... 5

9.

What should I be aware of if I am recruiting? .................................................................................................. 9

10.

Transitioning and Confidentiality ................................................................................................................ 9

11.

What should I be aware of? .......................................................................................................................... 9

12.

What is an inclusive workplace? ................................................................................................................ 10

13.

Our Colleague Network .............................................................................................................................. 10

14.

Additional support ...................................................................................................................................... 10

Guide information. ................................................................................................................................................. 11 Policy owner: [email protected]............................................................ 11 Ownership and confidentiality .............................................................................................................................. 11

Internal, Supporting Our Trans Colleagues, Version1, Page 2 of 11

Introduction

Gender can also refer to someone’s own internal sense of being a man or a woman, an individual may also place

This guide gives you more information about gender and

themselves elsewhere on the gender spectrum such as

gender reassignment, which is one of the nine protected

identifying as agender. (See the section on non-binary).

characteristics covered by the Equality Act and covered by UK Law.

2.

How is crossdressing defined?

This is only a guide and is designed to give you an overall

This describes a person who chooses to wear the clothes

understanding. Gender and gender reassignment can be

typically worn by the opposite sex (previously known as a

a very personal thing and impacts everyone differently,

transvestite). This is known as a form of gender

therefore if you work with or manage someone who

expression and is distinctly different from gender identity.

identifies as different gender or is in the process of transitioning it’s best to talk to them (if they are happy to)

3.

How is transgender defined?

to understand their situation and how best you can This is an umbrella term used for people who don’t

support them.

identify with the sex assigned to them at birth i.e. on their

Key terms

birth certificate.

Agendered – applies to someone whose doesn’t identify

Some people may have had, are in the process of, or

with either gender; genderless, lacking gender or gender

intend to have, surgery to undergo gender reassignment

neutral.

or live their life completely as the opposite sex. For some

Cis-gendered – applies to someone who gender

they may choose to identify as the opposite sex at certain

matches their assigned sex at birth.

times or choose to adopt certain aspects of the opposite

Gender expression – refers to the way that a person

sex’s life. Gender can be expressed externally through

uses appearance, mannerisms and other personal traits

clothes, behaviour, characteristics etc.

to communicate their gender. Genderfluid – applies to a person whose gender identity

Transgender people can be straight, gay, lesbian or

changes over time.

bisexual and you should not make assumptions about

Gender identity – relates to a person's inner sense of

someone’s sexual orientation just because they are

being male or female.

transgender.

Non-binary – Applies to a person who does not identify as male or female.

Transgender can be shortened to ‘trans’. People with a

Transgender – applies to a person whose gender is

female birth sex but living as a man may refer to

different from their assigned sex at birth.

themselves as a transgender man (‘trans man’) and

1.

someone assigned male at birth sex living as a woman

How is gender defined?

may call themselves a transgender woman (‘trans woman’). However, some trans people may choose not

Gender describes the characteristics that a society or

to refer to their trans history once the process of gender

culture defines as masculine or feminine.

reassignment is complete and simply identify as the

Gender is

different to sex which refers to biological differences, for

gender in which they now live i.e. male/female.

example; internal and external sex organs.

4.

How is transsexual defined?

So while your sex as male or female is a biological fact that is the same in any culture, what that means in terms

Transsexual is a term used by some people who are

of your gender role as a ‘man’ or a ‘woman’ in society can

currently undergoing or may previously have undergone

be quite different cross culturally. These ‘gender roles’

the process of gender reassignment surgery.

refer to the characteristics and behaviours that different cultures attribute to the sexes. Internal, Supporting Our Trans Colleagues, Version1, Page 3 of 11

The term Transsexual is an antiquated term and not all

The law states that a transgender person:

people who have undergone gender reassignment 

surgery will identify as transsexual.

May be covered by the Act as soon as they disclose, or it is found out that they are transgender (living in

Using the terms Trans is suggested as it is broad

the new gender identify).

reaching and allows an individual to define themselves



Can get legal recognition of their new gender.

i.e. whether they identify as transsexual or transgender.



May apply to the Gender Recognition Panel (GRP) and obtain a Gender Recognition Certificate (GPC)

5.

How is non-binary defined?

which entitles them to recognition of the gender stated on the certificate; it also enables them to get

Non-binary is the term for people who don’t feel male or female. They may feel that they have elements of both,

their birth certificate changed, should they wish to. 

Can

claim

specific

benefits

and

pension

that they are somewhere in between or that they are

arrangements attributed to their new gender, for

something different. They may also change their feelings

example get state pension at their new gender age.

towards their gender over a period of time – this is



sometimes known as genderfluid.

May be protected from disclosure of any information relating to their gender reassignment.

 Non-binary people may also identify themselves as

May claim protection under the Sex Discrimination Act in their new gender.

transgender. Recognition of gender doesn’t affect records of original They may not wish to identify themselves as either gender or be referred to as a specific gender term, for example, stating whether they are Mr or Mrs/Miss, he or she. Non-binary people may wish to be referred to as ‘they’ or just by their name rather than he or she. If someone in your team makes this request you should accept this and use the term ‘they’ going forward when referring to them. Discuss with them how they want this

gender.

Therefore any previous gender history will

remain unchanged. These records should be treated as confidential

documents

and

held

by

the

People

Manager/Partner with restricted access. The Sex Discrimination Act has also been amended to cover people who have had or are undergoing gender reassignment. The Act means:

communicated to the other people they work with and whether they would like everyone to adopt this approach.



It’s unlawful to discriminate against a colleague or job applicant or contractor on the grounds of that

Being

non-binary is different from

being

intersex

(someone who is born with both male and female

person’s gender reassignment. 

reproductive organs).

It’s unlawful for an employer to instruct someone else to do something discriminatory e.g. telling an employment agency not to hire a transgender

Non-Binary refers to someone’s gender orientation and is distinctly different from their sexual orientation. Nonbinary people can be straight, gay, lesbian or bisexual and you should not make assumptions about someone’s

person. 

Pressure to discriminate is unlawful e.g. threatening not to work, unless their employer dismisses a colleague who’s undergoing gender reassignment.

sexual orientation just because they are non-binary.

6.

What are our legal obligations?

Yes, the Gender Recognition Action 2004 and the Equality Act 2010 gave trans people new rights within law. The Acts place clearer law upon us to protect these individuals from any form of discrimination or harassment

There are a very few circumstances where discrimination against a trans person can be justified (although these exceptions do not apply if someone has a Gender Recognition Certificate). Where such circumstances exist there must be evidence that the organisation has acted reasonably.

and in order to protect their identity. Internal, Supporting Our Trans Colleagues, Version1, Page 4 of 11

These circumstances could be: 

If there’s a genuine requirement which means

Other considerations

the job has to be done by someone of a 

particular sex; 

If

the

job

involves conducting

intimate

If



the

colleague who is undergoing gender

reassignment

searches; 

For a

surgery

or

medical

procedures

associated with their transition and is absent for a

job

involves

working

in

close

significant period of time, retirement on medical

physical/social contact and we can show

grounds may be considered in the same way as for

people would object;

any other person who is absent from the workplace

If the job relates to an organised religion

for a significant length of time due to medical

which objects to transgenderism for religious

purposes.

reasons (this exception still applies even if someone

has

a

Gender

Recognition

This would be considered on

an

individual case by case basis. 

A colleague who is diagnosed as suffering from ‘Gender Dysphoria’ or ‘Gender Identity Disorder’,

Certificate).

may meet the definition of disability under the Any cases of discrimination can end up in an employment

Equality Act.

tribunal and cause serious damage to our business and

Guide for more information.

See the Supporting our Disabled

its reputation. At Tesco, we’re committed to promoting a culture of equality and diversity across the business, by

8.

What should I be aware of when someone is transitioning?

ensuring that our business and its policies and processes do not discriminate against any individual or group of individuals.

Understanding gender reassignment In order to support anyone transitioning it’s important to

For more information see the Equal Opportunities and

have an overall understanding of the process and what to

Diversity Policy.

expect.

7.

Trans people who seek medical intervention are typically

At what point does the Equality Act apply?

diagnosed with ‘gender dysphoria’ as a first step. Gender dysphoria describes the sense of a strong persistent

The Act applies where a person has proposed to

discomfort or distress caused by the difference between a

undergo, is undergoing, or has undergone a process (or

person’s self-identified gender and the gender they were

part of a process) for the purpose of re-assigning the

assigned at birth.

person’s sex by changing physiological or other attributes of sex.

This doesn’t mean they have to undergo any

The key elements to be aware of are:

medical procedures, they could simply choose to live 

permanently as the opposite sex.

Psychological assessment by a psychiatric team before, during and after the gender reassignment.

Transgender people who don’t intend to transition



Following a suitable period of assessment, the individual will be prescribed hormones to encourage

permanently are not protected by the Act.

their body to physically change towards their desired gender. In some cases these hormones will need to

It is discrimination to treat transsexual people less

be taken for life.

favourably for being absent from work because they propose to undergo, are undergoing or have undergone



The individual will be required to live, work and

gender reassignment than they would be treated if they

dress, in their desired gender full time for at least

were absent because they were experiencing an illness,

one year before any surgical intervention.

injury or undergoing some other medical procedure.



Some physical changes can only become a reality by surgery and in most cases they will require

Internal, Supporting Our Trans Colleagues, Version1, Page 5 of 11

multiple operations.

This will mean the individual

needs of the person involved, ensuring their wellbeing is

can’t work for a period of time whilst they recover.

at the core of all plans in relation to their transition within

Recovery periods can be anything from a week to 6

the workplace.

months, depending on the actual operation and any 

complications.

Successful support depends crucially on taking account

The individual may also require additional support to

of the colleague’s views on how to proceed. Sensitive and

help them transition, such as speech therapy.

considered discussions can identify and resolve potential areas of difficulty and conflict before they arise. It’s

It may be several years before some operations are

therefore important at an early stage to agree an action

performed and an individual is fully transitioned.

plan.

Transitioning can be extremely stressful and emotional for

Key elements include: -

the individual and it’s important not to make assumptions



about what they are going through. As this is such a personal thing, individuals will cope differently and have

personal details and social gender. 

different issues to deal with depending on their own

Whether the colleague wishes to stay in their current post or be redeployed, on a temporary or permanent

personal circumstances. It is important that anyone who is transitioning or has transitioned is supported and given

The anticipated point in time of change of name,

basis. 

access to the resources they need during this time.

An anticipation of time off for medical appointments, treatments and surgical procedures and the handling of such absence.

We should ensure that a colleague is supported where



necessary and appropriate, and keep the lines of communication open so they know they are able to raise

account of the change of personal details. 

any concerns about their on-going employment with us.

When and how other colleagues should be informed - the colleague should decide who performs this task



Managing someone who is in the process of transitioning

Amendments to records and systems to take

Whether any training in gender identity issues is needed.



How to handle any harassment or hostile reactions from other colleagues and/or customers.

Working with and managing a colleague who is in the process of transitioning will vary according to many



Agreeing at which point they’ll commence using single sex facilities.

factors; for example, what stage they are at in their transition or what job the individual is performing.

This action plan should be reviewed and updated regularly. Under no circumstances should this action plan

The first step is to reassure the colleague that they will be

be passed to anyone else without the express permission

supported as much as possible and confirm who will be

of the individual undergoing gender reassignment.

their main point of contact during their transition. This will usually be the People Manager/Partner along with the

Colleague facilities

colleague’s Manager. This can be a very emotive issue for both transgender The pace for transitioning is dependent on the individual,

colleagues and other colleagues.

as the whole process can be stressful and is subject to many changes. Patience and understanding will be

From the moment that a colleague discloses they are

required at all times. There is no need to receive

living permanently in the opposite gender, the law allows

confirmation in writing that someone is going through

them to use the gender specific facilities for their new

gender reassignment.

gender, for example a trans woman i.e. a male who has transitioned and now identifies as female can use the

To ensure successful support of a colleague during their

women’s facilities. The same applies to a trans woman

transition it’s essential to take account of the individual Internal, Supporting Our Trans Colleagues, Version1, Page 6 of 11

i.e. a male who has transitioned and now identifies as

If anything is agreed or discussed it’s a good idea to

female is legally permitted to use male facilities.

capture it on the action plan so everyone is clear on what the colleague will be expecting from us and what we

Supporting the colleague

expect from them.

Once an individual has a Gender Recognition Certificate

Managing time off work

(GRC), then in law they must be treated as someone of their acquired gender.

The transitioning period can take several years to complete and during this time the colleague will have

Here are some additional things to be aware of and/or

multiple medical appointments and surgeries followed by

consider:

recuperation periods. We should allow the colleague time off for all the necessary appointments, these would



All situations will need to be handled sensitively.

normally be unpaid however you should try to work with



Remember it’s likely to be a stressful and traumatic

the colleague to see if they could make the time up, work

time, before, during and after transitioning.

a different shift or change the time they start/finish to

Occupational Health may be able to provide some

accommodate any appointment(s).



support for the individual with all aspects of health



during this period, remember the colleague will need

Colleagues will be entitled to company sick pay

to consent if a referral is to be made.

(depending on their length of service) whilst they are off

Discuss with the individual, what advice and support

for surgeries and recuperation. Once company sick pay

they are receiving from their Doctor or other health

has been exhausted they will be entitled to statutory sick

professionals and the impact that this may/will have

pay (if eligible).

on the day to day life, particularly in respect of the 

working environment.

Absences should be recorded but not used in relation to

Remind them of the Employee Assistance Support

any absence management procedure; they should just be

Line 0800 316 9337 who can offer a wide range of

regarded as a short term reasonable adjustment.

support and advice including counselling. 

Consider what support you can offer the colleague.



Provision of leave for medical purposes i.e. sick leave during any operations and recuperation

Other colleagues 

help manage and support the situation sensitively.

periods. 



Provision of compassionate leave (unpaid) where



It is important that colleagues understand what is

appropriate (e.g. in order to deal with family

happening so that they can be supportive.

problems).

example, some

Reassure the individual that all information regarding

accept, or see it as a source of amusement)

their gender reassignment will be treated as

Remember: You must gain permission from the

confidential and would be regarded as ‘sensitive

colleague undergoing gender reassignment before

data’ under the Data Protection Act. Any disclosure

you discuss it.

is only permitted by the express consent of the 

Gain support from your Lead Team/Managers to



(For

colleagues may find it difficult to

Discuss with colleagues who may be affected by the

colleagues.

use of single sex facilities and reassure them that

Dress code - whilst the colleague should follow our

this is not a sexual matter.

normal uniform/dress code policy, some areas of this



Ensure that colleagues understand our Equal

For

Opportunities and Diversity Policy and reiterate that

example, a male transitioning to a female may wish

any form of discrimination or harassment will not be

to start wearing part of the female uniform but not all

tolerated.

may be relaxed during the transition period.

of it.



If you are aware of any form of harassment or bullying,

due

to

the

colleague’s

gender

reassignment, you should deal with it immediately. It Internal, Supporting Our Trans Colleagues, Version1, Page 7 of 11

may be appropriate to do this informally at first, but

Updating and maintaining records

ensure the colleague who is committing the act of



harassment or bullying understands the seriousness

The Gender Recognition Act stipulates that all information

of any situation and that if it continues, disciplinary

regarding gender reassignment is to be treated as

action will be taken.

confidential and is regarded as ‘sensitive data’ under the

We are liable for any act by a colleague in the

Data Protection Act. Any disclosure is only permitted by

course of their employment (both in and out of work)

the express consent of the colleague.

unless we can show we had taken steps that were

 

reasonably practicable to stop an colleague doing a

There are some specific circumstances where it is

particular act e.g. Equal Opportunities training.

necessary to divulge gender history, e.g., life insurance

However, colleagues remain personally liable for

policies for the individual. However, we should always

their acts even if we are found liable too.

get the consent of the colleague before giving out any

If you receive grievances from other colleagues,

information.

ensure they are fully investigated and that all 

colleagues feel they are fairly treated.

The personnel file should be updated as the colleague

In some cases it may be prudent to provide

transitions as per the agreed action plan.

counselling and further training on this. The following is a list of items/systems which will need to

The customers

be updated:

Depending on the nature of the colleague’s work, they



Name badge / pass

may have contact with people outside of the company, for



Clock card

example suppliers, and it may be advisable to make them



Payroll

aware of the change. This must be dealt with using the



Personnel record

utmost discretion, and should only be done with the



Uniform

permission of the trans colleague.



Locker facilities (if separate facilities available)



Clubcard and Privilegecard

In some circumstances the colleague may not feel



Tesco Shares

comfortable in continuing with the external relationships



Pensions

they had before they transitioned, and if this is the case we should seek alternatives in order to accommodate a

In some circumstances you may not be able to change

change. Maybe they could swap suppliers with another

some records/systems until your trans colleague changes

member of the team or change the account they look

their name legally.

after. Whatever the situation we should try and support

colleague so they are fully aware of the situation and

the colleague where we can.

understand the reasons for this.

The company has a duty to protect its colleagues at all

Time of transition

This should be explained to the

times. Unfortunately some members of the public may act in a discriminatory manner towards, or act inappropriately

At the point of transition, some people prefer to take a

to, a colleague going through the process of gender

brief break to prepare to return to work in their acquired

reassignment. The Code of Business Conduct regarding

gender. This can be taken as holiday, a period of unpaid

unacceptable behaviour should be followed, and the

leave or in the form of a lifestyle break.

customer politely

made aware that the colleague is a

period we should take the opportunity to make sure that

capable and valued member of our team, and that it is our

all records and IT systems are amended appropriately. If

policy not to discriminate on any basis, or to allow our

no break is taken, any items which need updating (such

customers to discriminate against our colleagues.

as a new pass) should be prepared in advance, and all

During this

records amended at transition or as soon as possible thereafter. Internal, Supporting Our Trans Colleagues, Version1, Page 8 of 11

You should think about the colleague’s first day at work in

viewing someone’s profile you may discover someone’s

the acquired gender, and this should be discussed with

gender or the fact they are trans or make an assumption

them. Some will be happy to take the initiative and others

about

hesitant to do so, so you’ll need to ensure the trans

remember that someone’s gender is confidential to them

person is not ignored or excluded. Being accompanied on

and should not be discussed or speculated about with

arrival at work by a particular friend amongst colleagues

anyone else.

may make things easier.

unconsciously influence your decision.

People’s reactions will depend on how much they knew in

Also remember that most social media sites allow you to

advance but they can’t be predicted so you will need to

see who has viewed your profile so a potential candidate

see what happens and monitor closely how things are

may know that you’ve viewed their profile.

going. It is very important that the day of transition gives

about a candidate’s gender or gender reassignment

the transsexual colleague a feeling of respect and

should never be asked during the interview/assessment

confidence in their future in the workplace.

process. In some circumstances, candidates may advise

it,

sometimes

unconsciously.

You

should

Remember not to let what you see

Questions

you that it is their intention to transition.

In such

The eventual goal of the individual will be to blend into

circumstances you should thank the candidate for their

society in the new gender. There are many things that

openness, explain that if appointed we would of course

will need to be re-learnt such as social interaction with

support them and then continue with the interview i.e.

others. For this purpose it would be useful to offer a

does this person have the skills and experience for the

mentor to give guidance with particular areas such as

job. You should never use this information to evaluate the

handling customers. People react differently when dealing

candidates or make your final decision

with a man or a woman, and can expect a different type of interaction with a male member of staff to a female member of staff.

10.

Transitioning and Confidentiality

This does take time to become

accustomed to and will be part of the learning process.

There is no obligation on trans people to inform us of their gender reassignment. However, should they voluntarily

9.

What should I be aware of if I am recruiting?

disclose their change of gender at recruitment stage or perhaps to the People Team, this information must not be disclosed

further

without

the

colleague’s

specific

The right to be treated equally begins as soon as a

authorisation. The holder of a GRC may choose to

prospective colleague reads a job advert or accesses our

confidentially notify the People Team, but remember best

online job search. All candidates are screened on their

practice is to assume all trans colleagues have Gender

relevant experience and the skills they can bring to the

Recognition Certificates.

role. Once a trans person starts work the lead should be taken As part of the recruitment process we ask all candidates

from them about whether their trans status is discussed.

to complete an equal opportunities monitoring form as

The new colleague may be happy for some colleagues to

part of their online application. This information is kept for

know they are trans but not others, so even if someone

monitoring purposes only and is stored separately from

appears to be open about their gender it must always be

your application. This information won’t be seen by or

their decision about who to share this information with.

shared with the hiring manager.

Revealing someone is transgender (‘outing’ them) could put them at risk of discrimination and violate their right to

If you are going to view someone’s social media profile as

privacy.

part of the screening process you should tell the candidate first and give them the opportunity to update

11.

What should I be aware of?

their profile in advance. You should also make sure that you view all profiles (or everyone that has one) not just a

It’s important to remember that while some colleagues will

select few to make sure that everyone is treated fairly. By

be ‘open’ and happy to talk about their gender others will

Internal, Supporting Our Trans Colleagues, Version1, Page 9 of 11

want to keep them private and it’s important that we

mentoring, development and social activities. We also

respect that.

want to highlight to our non LGBTI colleagues that ‘we are here’ demonstrating that everyone is welcome at

We all have a responsibility to maintain an inclusive

Tesco. You don’t have to have to identify yourself as

workplace which allows colleagues, regardless of their

LGBTI to join.

gender or non-binary gender or whether they are transgender/transsexual to feel that they are respected

You can find out more information about Out at Tesco

and valued as individuals.

and register at www.outattesco.com or get in touch [email protected]

Always work to ensure that everyone is treated with dignity and respect and promote a culture that recognises

Related Reading

there is value in working in a diverse environment. Disciplinary Policy Having a diverse workforce means we have different

Equal Opportunities and Diversity Policy

people with different ways of living their lives, opinions,

Grievance Policy

skills and feelings which make us all unique. However

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there are groups within our society who have differing

Supporting Colleagues’ – Age, Race, Sex and Marriage

views, and whilst this may be their opinion outside of work

and Civil Partnership

they must not let it impact their ability to do their job,

Supporting Trans Colleagues

affect their working relationships or influence their

Supporting Colleagues’ Religion and Belief

decisions in any way.

Supporting Colleagues’ Sexual Orientation

12.

Northern Ireland Equality Statement

What is an inclusive workplace?

14.

Additional support

An inclusive workplace is one where everyone is treated with dignity and respect. Where the talents and skills of



www.inclusiveemployers.co.uk The UK’s leading inclusion and diversity experts, working with employers to create inclusive workplaces.



www.scottishtrans.org The Scottish Transgender Alliance works to improve gender identity and gender reassignment equality, rights and inclusion in Scotland.



http://genderedintelligence.co.uk/ Gendered Intelligence work predominantly with the transgender community and those who impact on transgender lives. They particularly specialise in supporting young transgender people aged 11-25.



www.gires.org.uk Gender Identity Research and Education Society provides information for trans people, their families and the professionals who care for them.



www.depend.org.uk Offering free, confidential advice, information and support to all family members, spouses, partners and friends of transsexual people in the UK.

different people are what’s most valued and where productivity and customer service improve because the team are happier, more motivated and more aware of the benefits that inclusion can bring. In inclusive companies individuals who identify as trans and may be going through gender re-assignment or perhaps identify as non-binary are all able to be themselves, without fear of discrimination . should

feel

comfortable

about

Everyone

participating

in

conversations and sharing their view on different subjects without the fear of abuse, unwanted jokes or comments being made.

13.

Our Colleague Network

The purpose of our Out at Tesco network is to encourage people to ‘be themselves’ at work and not worry about hiding anything, which can make us all work more productively. We want to highlight to colleagues that they ‘have a place to go’. Out at Tesco offers networking, support,

Internal, Supporting Our Trans Colleagues, Version1, Page 10 of 11



www.gendertrust.org.uk The Gender Trust supports all those affected by gender identity issues.



www.clareproject.org.uk The Clare Project is a selfsupporting group based in Brighton and Hove open to anyone wishing to explore issues around gender identity.



www.equalityhumanrights.com The Equality and Human Rights Commission seeks to identify and tackle areas where there is still unfair discrimination or where human rights are not being respected and to act as a catalyst for change. The EHRC also provide statutory guidance on the Equality Act for employers, which can be found here: http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/private-andpublic-sector-guidance 



www.northernconcord.org.uk Northern Concord is a Manchester based transvestite, transgendered and transsexual support and social group.



www.translondon.org.uk TransLondon is a discussion/support group for all members of the trans community, whatever their gender identity.



www.gayadvicedarlington.co.uk Offers free, confidential support, advice and drop in sessions to trans people at a full time LGBT centre.



http://www.stonewall.org.uk/

Stonewall campaigns for the equality of lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans people across Britain.

www.blgbt.org Supports the LGBT community in Birmingham.

Guide information. Version No. 1

Date of change th

8 February 2016

Summary of change Updated document

Policy owner: [email protected] Ownership and confidentiality This document shouldn’t be shared with anyone externally without permission from your Director. This policy and any associated documentation remains the property of Tesco and should be returned if requested.

Internal, Supporting Our Trans Colleagues, Version1, Page 11 of 11